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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 18, 1974 - Page 8

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 18, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Gazelle Dtioto hv L. VV. Ward Mrs. William Smith, 216 Red Wing road SW, left, admires a quilt which was presented to her Saturday as the winner of Civic Newcomers' raffle. With Mrs. Smith, from left, are: Mrs. Robert Kitterman, jr., 3110 Franbrook terrace NW; Mrs. Bruce Wands, 6013 Langdon avenue SW, and Mrs. Garry Bye, 6032 Langdon avenue SW. Mrs. Wands is chairman of the ways and means com- mittee which sponsored the raffle and Mrs. Bye is president of Civic Newcomers. Mrs. Kitterman was Mrs. Wands' assistant. Proceeds from the raffle are being presented to the Linn county Council on Aging. Features Turkey Easy on Budget Woman Gets Settlement for Pill Damage Bridge By The Associated Press Americans trying lo fit holi- day celebrations into inflation- light budgets'have at least one thing to be thankful for this year: Turkey is cheaper than it was in 1973. An Associated Press survey shcmed lliat while the cost of most of the ingredients of a Thanksgiving dinner have gone up, turkey prices have dropped by about 20 cents a pound to an average of 49 lo cents. Abundant Supply Poullry producers said the reason for the decline was an abundant supply and they complained they were losing money on Iheir birds. "We've been losing up to S3 per said Carl Johnson, head of the Wisconsin Turkey Federation. Poultry producers said it costs about 35 cents a pound to raise a turkey. They're getting only about 28 cents a pound. The rest of the Thanksgiv- ing dinner is more expensive, however. Comparison A comparison of super- market advertisements in Montgomery county, Md.. for November. 1973, and No- vember. 1974, showed bread, used for stuffing, was up from to 48 cenls a loaf and fresh cranberries went from 29 to 39 cents a pound. And, if you get BRIDE-ELECT GIVEN KITCHEN SHOWER SUNDAY Miss Carol Ann .Jennings, Nov. 23 bride-elect of Richard E. Garretl, was honored at a kitchen shower given Sunday at Farmer's State bank in Hiawatha. Co-hostesses to the guests were Mrs. Frank DeSousa and Mrs. Marvin Quaas. Parents of the engaged couple arc Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jennings, Kegal avenue and Mr md Mrs I rl 1 irntt inn') 1> il< fl i nut S! a headache from all the festiv- ities, aspirin went from cenls per 100 to 89 cenls. Most Americans said they'd manage a traditional dinner despite inflation, but there were exceptions. More Meal "Usually we have company and we buy more than one meat. This year we are get- ling a small turkey and that's said Yvonne Porter of Detroit. Mrs. Porter and her hus- band are both out of work she is on strike from her job at Detroit Optomelric center and he has been laid off from his post as a security guard. "The holiday we would usually go way said Mrs. Porter. "Now wo can just barely feed our family." BRUNCH, SHOWER FETE MISS GRETCHEN PAULSON Miss Gretchen Paulson, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Donald Paulson, 057 Val- Icybrook drive SE, was ho- nored a brunch and bridal shower given Saturday morn- ing at El merest Golf and Country club. Hostesses were the Mines. Joe Tefer, Wilfred Drahos, John Roushar. Allen Berndl, Stanley Moon and Plenty Bates. Miss Paulson is the Dec. 29 bride-elect of William Enke of Iowa City, son of Mr. and Mrs. .1. K. Enke of Oelwein. CORRECTION The Thursday meeting of Alpha Delta Gamma will bo at p.m. rather than at a.m. as was reported in Sun- day's Gazette. SALEM, Ore. (UP1) Two manufacturers of birth control pills were ordered to pay a 37- year-old Portland woman damages Friday by the Oregon supreme court. The woman, Mrs. Freda McEwcn, claimed she had headaches and falling hair from one type of pill and then contracted blindness in one eye after she switched In an- other type. In upholding a lower court ruling, the state justices found there was substantial evidence that both pills were factors in producing the injuries. The suit was against Orlho Pharmaceutical Corp., man- ufacturers of Orlho-Novum pills, and Syntex laboratories, makers of Norinyl pills. Mrs. McEwen began using Norinyl in December. and experienced headaches, nausea, falling hair and other effects. She switched to Ortho- Novum a year later and even- tually suffered blindness in one eye and damage lo the other eye. The state supreme court said the manufacturers of such drugs have the duty "of making timely and adequate warnings lo the medical pro- fession of any dangerous sido effects produced by its drugs." Although the companies did make some warnings. Ihe jury and the supreme court found the actions were not sufficient to alerl the woman's doctor lo Ihe possible hazards. West Side Club Mitchell movement winners of (he game played Sunday al Welly-Way were: North-south Mr. and Mrs. George Tsehelsehol, first, and Mrs. Richard and Keith V. Hanson, second: cast- west Jay Baum and Dennis Curdle, first, and Bill Wilde and Barbara dishing, second. The next game will be played Thursday al at Wclly- Wav. SHOWER GIVEN FOR MISS SANDRA K. BROWN A balh and linen shower was given Sunday afternoon by Mrs. John Claflin, 1050 Twenty-sixth street N'W, for Miss Sandra K. Brown. She is the Nov. 29 bride-elect of Patrick Richard Cobb, 150 Miller avenue SW. Co-hosless- cs to the 20 gucsls were Sue While and Jarstad. Miss Brown is the daughter of the Robert Browns, 2220 Tenth av- enue SW. Parents of the fu- ture bridegroom arc Mrs. George Kaufman, 3011 Ta- niara drive SW, and Melvin A. Cobb of Stone Park, III. 322 2nd Ave. S.E This Week's Specfaf OPEN TONITE TIL 9 PWl! One Group of Famous Name and Reg. to 1 2 Styles Solids Sizes 8 to 1 8 Short Sleeves Long Sleeves Patterns Dreucs MARTINS ERA Supporters Soy Coins Mode By Peggy Simpson WASHINGTON (AP) Supporters (if the Equal Rights amendment say the recent state legislative elections have brightened the chances' that five more states will ratify ERA, thus making it part of the Constitution. The Constitution requires approval by 38 stales, and 3.'l states previously have approved the amendment. The ERA would prohibit discrimination based on sex. The new optimism among ERA supporters represents a turnaround from the pessimism expressed lust summer at a meeting of the National Women's Political Caucus. Spring Approval Mary Brooks, ERA coordinator for the League ci Women Voters, and Pal Kecfcr of Common Cause had told the caucus that Ihey doubted the ERA would be approved by more than two or three more states this spring. But the elections changed that forecast. "I don't know of a state where we haven't picked up pro- ERA said Brooks. The defeat of anti-ERA incumbents was particularly noticeable in such states as Missouri, Florida. Arizona and South Carolina, she said. Ill some contests, the Victors were women challenging anti-ERA office holders. In other cases, the winners were men who had the backing of the informal ERA lobby, consist- ing of the League, the National Women's Political Caucus, Common Cause, the National Organization for Women, the Business and Professional Women, and others. Tremendous Effecf Miss Bascom Is Married to C.D.Campbell "This will have a tremendous effect on the lobbying power of the women's said Brooks. "Last year we weren't taken seriously. This year we damn well are going lo be." Diane Saulter of Common Cause said pro-ERA candidates in the overwhelming majority of races where the ERA was a central issue. This year's elections were the first to lest the political potency of the ERA issue. With six or seven local lobby groups questioning candi- dates about their positions cm the amendment, candidates were forced lo lake stands on it as never before, Brooks said. "I will be amazed if Illinois, North Dakota, and Missouri don't ratify it next she said. "North Carolina, Okla- homa and Nevada have very good chances. Florida, Indiana and Arizona are going to have some real battles but they have a chance to ratify, loo." CITY Miss Sharon Lynn Bascom, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bascom of 214 Sixth street SW, Cedar Rapids, was married to Creightim Dale Campbell Saturday. The cere- mony at 2 o'clock was per- formed by the Rev. Mearle Griffith at United Methodist church. The bridegroom is Ihe son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Campbell of Central City. For her wedding the bride selected a gown of flocked nylon over salin styled with a Peter Pan collor and lace- Irimmed sleeves. A matching headpiece completed her en- semble and her flowers were a bouquet of white carnations and red roses. Camella Campbell, sister of the bridegroom, attended as maid of honor. She wore a gown of red and white satin and carried a single mum. Lynn Knrtc served as best man and ushers were Greg Carl and Melvin Campbell, brother of the bridegroom. Ed Bascom, brother of the bride, was candlelighler and Heidi McDonald, flowcrgirl. A reception for 75 guests was given at the church fol- lowing the ceremony. The couple will temporarily reside at the Cedar Rapids address. The bride is em- ployed by the Ramada Inn, Cedar Rapids, and Mr. Campbell by Mid American dairv in Marion. Open House Planned For Harley Robinsons a 'cat' Denied Reporfs Phyllis Schafly. the Alton. 111.: crusader against Ihe ERA, denied (here had been any rout of her supporters from slate- houses. She said she had not been able lo analyze (he elections yet but said the ERA was nol (he central issue where con- servatives who opposed the amendment were defeated. Mrs. Schafly also noted that the Arizona state chairman of Ihe Slop ERA .committee won a stale house seal and in Il- linois several leaders of Ihe anli-EHA movement won promo- lions lo the slate senate and to congress. The Robinsons ANN MARIE BROWXLIE IS FETED AT SHOWER Miss Ann Marie Brownlie, Nov. 23 bride-elect of Robert Louis Tow, jr., was feted at a pantry shower given Sunday afternoon by Mrs. James Trcka, 4225 Dalewood avenue SE. Mrs. Roy Mauser was co- hosless to the 30 guests. Par- ents of Ihe engaged couple arc Mr. and Mrs. John C. Brownlie of Fairfax and Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Tow, 4219 Dalewood avenue SE. Fabric Softener Tenderizes Cloth A fabric softener "tenderiz- es" Ihe fabric so thai il feels soft and smooth to Ihe touch. It also makes towels fluffier. This occurs because the softener provides a lubricating film on the strands of the fi- ber, allowing them to move more readily against each other. As a result, wrinkling is minimized and ironing ei- ther eliminated or reduced. An open house is planned Sunday from 1 lo 5 at Jane Boyd Community house in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Ilarley Robinson, 1512 Tenth street SE. The occasion is their wedding anniversary. Hostesses for Ihe event will be the couple's daughters. Mrs. Laurence Booth and Mary Robinson, both of Cedar Rapids. The Robinsons also have two sons, George of Blairstown and Vermin, sla- lioned with the navy in Nor- folk, Va. There are H grand- children and one great- grandchild. Mr. Robinson and the former Mary E. Eversull were married Nov. 24, 1924 in Sioux Citv. By Abigail Van Hurcn DEAR ABBY: This is lor who wanted a big wedding but didn't know If his parents should help her par- ents foot Ihe bill because of tradition. 1 am getting married next month and when my fiance and 1 became engaged, his parents offered to split Ihe bills straight down the mid- dle. They figured lhat their son is also getting married ,aml they should help pay for the wedding. This has helped my parents a big way and now we can have the big wedding we've both always dreamed of. HAPPY IN CLEVELAND DEAR HAPPY: I'm happy too. Happy that someone has had the courage to break with tradition in the interest of fairness and common sense. Maybe you'll start a new tradition. I hope so. DEAR ABBY: you please let doctors, nurses, aides and hospital personnel know lhat when someone who works with them is hospital- ized, that person deserves the same consideration about vis- iting hours as anyone else in the hospital? I was hospitalized with a se- rious injury two months ago and during my stay, even Ihough there was a big sign on my door saying: "Positively No Visitors, Doctor's I was pestered to death by co- workers who felt I needed a little cheering up. Nurses, doctors, aides, and people from Ihe hospital .office came to see me. Most of them stayed for only 111 minutes but multiply lhat by nil every day and you'll have some idea of how exhausted I was. I finally had to leave the hospital to gel some rest. 1 love my co-workers, but they almost killed me with kind- ness. Please put this in your col- umn. I hope it goes up on hospital bulletin boards all over the country. FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE DEAR FLO: Here's your loiter. I hope it works. BABY SHOWER HONORS MRS. JIM MANGOLD A baby shower was given Sunday afternoon for Mrs. Jim Mangold, jr., of Ryan. Linda Mangold, 3312 Oakland road NE. was hostess to the 20 guests. ARE YOU PLANTS TO YOUR HOME FOR HOLIDAY ENTERTAiNINO? 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