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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 18, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 18, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- Cloudy tonight Tuesday with lows In- night, lo Highs Tumidity, low VOLUMK S3 N1JMBKR 313 CITY FINAL 15 CENTS CICDAIl RAPIDS, IUWA, MONDAY, WJVKMB1CR 111, I'J'M By Unllcil Press International I s r a o 1 i gunboats Monday shelled a suspected Arab gueril- la sea base in southern Lebanon from which it said guerilla frog- men had tried lo infiltrate into Israel, the Israeli military com- mand said. Diplomatic interven- tion by (he superpowers eased tension between Israel and Syria, reported close to war this weekend. Tension remained high on the Golan Heights and Israel said it would keep its troops on a war alert until Syria agrees to let U. N. truce observers remain on the cease-fire line, when their mandate expires at the end of the month. The Beirut newspa- per An Nahar reported Monday that Syria had decided to let the U. N. troops remain bu would ask certain conditions. Prevented War In London, qualified diplomat ic sources said only intervention by I he U. S. ami the Soviet Union appeared to have pre- vented a fifth Middle East war. But the diplomats said the su- perpowers succeeded only for the moment and that the same Arab-Israeli problems remain. Israel was concerned both with tension on the Syrian fron- tier and the possibility of Arab fiiicrilla raids from Lebanon. Monday, Israel was having more troubles in the occupied West Bank where violence by hackers of the Palestine Libera- tion Organization spread to East Jerusalem. Arab students there stoned passing vehicles and po- lice. "Terrorists tried lo infiltrate from Lebanon by sea to the Israeli coast using floats for their personal weapons and ex- plosives." the command said in an announvcmcnl. It said one guerilla was killed and another captured in the Sunday infiltra- tion attempt. The command said an Israeli j lower income taxpayers. patrol intercepted the guerillas on the beach near the Rosii Hanikra checkpoint on the Suits Name LaPeters, 2 Officers Cedar Ranlds Two Cedar Rapids men Mon- day morning filed suits in Cedar Rapids federal court against Po- iee Chief Wallace LaPeters and .wo Cedar Rapids police officers 'or alleged actions involving picket line dispute at the Roose- velt hotel Oct. 24. Both Carson Borseth and Jack Tessin claim LaPclers and the officers, Antonc Imhoff and Denlinger, along with others, severely beat them when a dispute arose outside hotel. Borseth, in his suit, asked in actual damages and in punitive damages from both LaPeters and Im- hoff. He'claimed an unidentified in- dividual hit him during a distur- ance and threw him against an automobile. He further contended La Peters and Imhoff then bea him and struck him in the head. While handcuffed and helpless in a police car, he said, Imhof! continued to strike him. Besides damages, Borseth asked for a federal court in- junction to slop a dam- age suit Imhoff has brought against him in small claims court. Tessin requested in ac- tual damages and in pu- nitive damages from LaPeters and Denlinger. As in the suit filed by Borselh, Tessin charged the two men loth individually and as members of (he police force. He claimed D e n li n g e r (Continued: Page 3, Col. 7.) nese Police, Clash TOKYO (AP) Some 400'taking is in the highest national helmeted radicals clashed wilh interest of the United Stalls Sweeping Tax Reform Dropped WASHINGTON (UPI) The louse ways and means commit- ee Monday abandoned hopes of vidcspread lax reform this year and moved toward approval of i smaller bill increasing oil company taxes by at least lillion and giving some relief to Speaker Carl Albert promised lo push the bill to tho house floor if the ways ALASKA STOPOVER President Ford was g reefed Sunday at Elmendorf air force base after mak- ing a brief speech while his plane was being refueled for the rest of his flight to Japan. armored riot police Monday as President Ford arrived in Ja- pan. About 200 demonstrat- ors were arrested and another shouted anti-Ford slogans. The outbursts look place two from the airport where Ford landed for the briefest of welcomes and did not mar the ceremonies. Ford then look a helicopter to downtown Toyko for an overnight rest in a heav- ily guarded palace. After a 15-hour flight from Washington across the Interna- tional Date Line, the first Amer- ican President to visit Japan scheduled a 17-hour respite to rest up before calling on Emper- or Hirohito Tuesday and open- ing talks with Prime Minister Tanaka. To minimize the chance of in- terference by radical leftists op- posed to tlie President's visit, neither the emperor nor Tanaka went to the airport, and the ar- rival ceremony there lasted only 11 minutes. Busloads of carefully screened Japanese wavec American and Japanese flags and applauded as Ford left Air Force One and shook hands will U.S. Ambassador James Hodg son, Takeshi Yasukawa, the Japanese ambassador to the U.S., and Japanese protocol of ficials. Israeli-Lebanese frontier. It said committee approved 9, Col. 4.) as ?la.n.ned- and means the bill 3 ef Reeessian StecEss Loraer NEW YORK I UPI) Reces- sionary fears based on reports I lion. of drastic production cutbacks! The only major question ap- by Chrysler Corp. and other jpeared It negative market factors drove! miltce wi Ways and Means Chairman Wilbur Mills (D-Ark.) outlined the smaller bill to the commit- tee Monday in its first meeting since the election recess, and there was almost no opposi- to be whether the, com- ........_. ould end the 22 percent prices sharply lower Monday on i oil depletion allowance immcdi- fhc New York Slock exchange. Trading was heavy. The Dow ately on Jan. 1 as Mills wants or phase it out over a two-year Jones Industrial average piling- period as in a bill previously ap- ed 1H.70 to C28.DI at 2 p.m. i proved by'the committee. WASHINGTON (AP) :upreinc court Monday set aside a lower-court ruling that Wis- consin's anti-obscenity law is unconstitulional and agreed to review another lower-court deci- sion against California's anti- obscenity law. By a 5 to 4 ruling, the su- Jrema court ordered lhc sev- enth U. S. circuit court of ap- jeals to reconsider its ruling against the Wisconsin law in the ight of recent obscenity rulings. The justices cited their own Jecision last year upholding a ederal obscenity law and a de- Ision of the Wisconsin supreme court upholding the Wisconsin law. Declared Invalid Justices Douglas, Brcnnan, Stewart and Marshall dissented, saying they believed the Wis- consin law should have been declared invalid. The Wisconsin case arose out of the conviction of Myron Amato, one of the operators of the J and M Book Store in Janesville, Wis., on charges of selling obscene magazines. Ama. lo'a conviction was upheld by !hc Wisconsin supreme court out was reversed by the federal appeals court. The California case arose, out of the showing of "Deep Throat" and "The Devil in Miss Jones" a', the Pussycat theater in Bucna Park, Calif., in No- vember, 107.'i. 21-Gun Salute Howitzers fired a 21-gun lule required by protocol and to ttie .Criminal uhui'Kcs were filed and ellll are pVnUIng" against employes of the theater. as, wf csccrtcd lo waiting helicopter for the 10 Vincent Miranda, proprietor of the theater, sued in federal vuiiiuer, court The supreme court said it wil n, decide at the lime of (he hear Jl'V fed- ing whelher it has jurisdiction lhc J Mlms rel irnnrl Inn r'nnrf f.iirt to review the ruling of a three- judge federal panel in Los Ange- les that ruled the California law unconstitulional. Copies Seized Copies of Ihe films were seized under orders issued by municipal court Judge John Smith of Bucna Park! seized films returned. The court said Ihe California law was unconsti- tutional under standards laid minute trip to the Wasaksaka palace in downtown Tokyo Built in 1900 as a home foi Japan's crown princes, it was made into a' state guest house six years ago. Leftist demonstrations against Ihe President's visit have so far down by I IK- supreme court In becn a much smaller scale than the On July 25, Ihe supreme court dismissed "for want of a sub- stantial federal question" an ap- "Single Step" "I am deeply conscious of the need lo continue the quest for Ford said. "I would rather travel thousands of miles for peace than take a single slep toward war." Making a refueling slop at Anchorage's E1 m e n d o r f air force base, Ford sought to bal- ance his desire for peace with his support for strong national Threatens Veto WASHINGTON sident Ford told the lame duck session of congress Mon- day that he would veto as inflationary a veterans bill raising benefits for Vietnam- era servicemen if it is sent to the White House in its present form. defenses. To his largely military audience, he said: "I want to reassure you today that my administration remains aware that the best in- surance for peace is the mainte- nance of first-class military forces ready for defense." Mrs. Ford, recuperating from cancer surgery, did not accom- pany her husband. She1 flew with him by helicopter Sunday from the While House to An- drews air force base, where the couple embraced warmly and Biased twice belorc several hundred well-wishers. No Decisions Secretary of Stale Kissinger, who was with Ford, (old report- ers aboard Air Force One that decisions are expccled lo emerge from Ford's four days in Japan. He said the aim is lo expand on current good rela- ions and determine how the (Continued: Page 3. Col. 8.) riols that forced cancellation of a visit by Eisenhower in I9CO. But the government peal from a conviction underjlhrcw a massive security screen Ihe California law. presidential visit In their appeal lo the supreme court, Orange county authorities visit wilh Tokyo police on ful alert and another or contend this amounted to a orders in other parts of ing that lhc law is conslilu-jthc country. The threat of demonstrations tional. In other cases Monday, Ihe i court: and the uncertain political fu- ture of Tanaka, who is accused WASHINGTON (AP) Wil- liam Ronan told congress Mon- day that there was "nothing sinister" involved in in gifts to him from Vice- presidenl-designate Rockefeller. "There is nothing in my rela- tionship with Nelson Rockefeller for which I need said Ronan, who has been a close personal aide and adviser !aramanlis Greek Victor ATHENS i APi Premier bishop Makarios. the elected Constantino Caramanlis won a president of Cyprus, to Ihe trou- to the former New York gover- nor for more than 18 years. Ronan told the senate rules committee that he could notj Rockefeller loaned Ronan1 using his official position to in a series of six Junior Chamber of Com-iprofil financially, caused some incuts beginning in 1963. Forgave Loans victory in election in Greece's Mediterranean island. 10 years, MIM. me ceuun m said ,hc ,riumpl, and declared Mnndav. tiemoc-; racy has place." gifts, most of them in the form of forgiven loans, because he never held a job in which he could enhance the interests of the Rockefeller family. Authority Transfer In particular Roman denied anv wrong-doing by either him- self or Rockefeller in t h e became Ihe leading opposition i transfer of the Triborough have been influenced by thcj Last May, just before support. in parliament. i Bridge and Tunnel Authority to became the nior adviser in the office of the Rockefeller family, Rockefeller forgave Ihe loans and gave him _ an additional Ronan testified the loans and were made to help himj provide for his family's future and for his own retirement. "I wish lo make it clear that at no time did I consider governor was under any tinning obligation lo loan me mcrce membership should he'questioning of Ihe value of opened lo women because trip. But at a sendoff organization receives federal fi- ceremony on the White House lawn, the President said lie was Agreed to decide it fixed coin-making his "first Irip overseas mission rates for stockbrokers ;ls President with full con- (Continued: Page !l, Col. n.) fidence that this timely under- 1 to its birth- democracy in Greece after ''.2 years of dictatorship was a Wilh almost all votes counted, joyful event "for all those who Caramanlis' Xcw Dcmocracyilove our country and on whose party look a record 55.5 wc arc counting for the ballots in Sunday's lion and was expected lo lake 211 of Ihe 711) seals in parlia- mini. At a noonday rcceplr.in n e w s in e n "certain problems arc extreme- ly crucial, which the na- Thc National Democrats, new Metropolitan Transpor- righl-wing group that advocated jlation Authority, which is nor'did tiic granting'o'f the return of Ihe monarchy, was sponsible for running all mass (hose loans have any rcla- gelling less Ihan 2 percent of transit facilities in lhc New ijonship to my willingness to the vote. This could indicate a! York City area. strong vole against Ihe restora- tion of Ihe monarchy in Ihe ref- erendum Dec. 8 to decide the issue. jstay in stale Ronan j Allegations have been madeisaid. that Ronan played a key role in! Ronan said there was no obli- ncgotialions that created Ihe au- gallon on him to perform spc- thorily and may have had Ihe cial service for Rockefeller "or j Among those apparently elect- opportunity to favor the family or any effort "lo cnii- bloodshed, withoulied was actress Melina of the Chase Manhallanldilion my outlook or views on upheavals, and finally with thclcouri, who ran on Papandreou's1 which is headed by Rock-'any measure of public policy." free expression of the will of in Piraeus. Ihe port of efe'ler's brother David people, democracy has rclurned'Athcns. ch.ls, to its birthplace." Knlc Denied the'bond holders of'the1 e n a t o r Cannon (D-Nev.i. Opposition Parties :innal one the (.'yprus tragedy: The Communist United Left prevails." iparly expected to make signifi- liut he --aid "together wilh Kilms lhc election but solidarity ol all me ilrc.ch.s irre-imadc a poor showing with only 
                            

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