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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Thursday, November 14, 1974 - Page 40

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 14, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                _2fi_ Tho Cedar Kaiilds .Guxrtic: 1'liurs., Nov. 14, 1974 Television Today By Jay Sharbutt 'Switch' Tries Tube Turn Off NEW YORK (AP) Nearly every game show on TV has a play-at-home version on sale in toy 'stores. But a new play- at-home TV game now coming on the market isn't seen On television. Nor is it likely to be. The reason: Its goal is to encourage less TV viewing by children. The game is It's being sold by mail by Action tor Children's Television, an activist group which since 1968 has demanded higher quality children's programs without commercials on tele- vision. The general aim of the (plaything "is to let families know there's something else to life than says Peggy Charren, president of ACT, based in Newtonville, Mass. The game, printed on fold- ing paper, starts with an imaginary TV set switched "on." It takes a player a maximum of 56 moves, fewer if luck prevails, to reach vic- tory, (which in this case is "off." There are 10 draw cards which let the combatants make from one to five moves at a time. They must thread their way through a total of 30 commercials, one technical difficulty, one station break and 19 shows with such names as "The Braided Bunch" and "Tarred En route, they get five "switch" alternatives, sucli as, one switch to public TV or a switch "from buying a toy to making one." The players pick their com- mercials from a stack of com- mercial cards for such imagi- nary goodies as "Glop a soft drink, or "CapriCavity They have to gel rid of the cards to move to new positions. "Since you can't win until you do says Mrs. Char- ren, "we 'hope the children and wo hope (heir parents play the game with them wjll really learn what the switches mean. "What they're saying is to switch off, to try another kind of activity, like walking or reading a book, or avoiding the sugar foods sold on chil- dren's television, or switching from 'buying the expensive toys that seem to make up al- most all the toy advertising on TV this season." She said the game isn't sold hi stores, only at ACT, which has ordered a first-round printing of "Switch" sheets, i ACT won't make any profit, she said, "and we're going to lose money even if we sell them all. Hopefully, it won't be more than a few thousand dollars. "But we felt the important thing about the game was its educational aspect. We're not using this as a fund-raiser." The game probably would be best for kids aged seven to 12, she said, but emphasized that their parents should play it with them because "the whole point is that it's a joint activity." "Switch" was devised by ACT, she said, "after we de- cided it might be fun to help children turn off the sets. "We've always felt that television is a joint responsi- bility, and that no matter how good programs are, there is a time when too much television isn't good for anybody and that there are alternatives." Municipalities Assn. The Linn County Municipal- Hies Assn. will meet Thursday at p.m. at the Central City school. Topics to be discussed include the federal flood insurance pro- gram for cities and the federal community development act Robert Josten of the Iowa League of Municipalities, Des, Moines, will serves as resource speaker. The public is invited to the meeting. Television Listings Cedar Waterloo Cedar Rapids Rock Island Thursday Night 2-AcHon News Wcalhcr, Spls; News Wcalhcr, Spts. News 6-6 O'clock Edition Spts., Weoihcr Weather, Spts. of Childhood- News 2-ToTellTrulh 7-Adam 12 Moke a Deal Music That Tune Music Make a Deal Now America? Is Right lions Couslcou Jacques Cousteaii 6-Slerra it Was America 2-CBS Movle- "Conqucst of Planet ol Apes" 7-lronslde of San Fran. of San Fran. "Conaucst of Planet ol Apes" "Conaucst ol Planet ot Apes" 13-lronsIde On 0 3_Harry O Ones On Be Announced On 2-Action News Weather, Spts. News Weather, Spts. News O'Clack Edition Spts., Wealher 10-Ncws, Weal tier, Spts. Nloht News 2-CBS "Lonoest Nloht" World of Entertainment World of Entertainment "Lonoest Nlghl" at War 13-Tonlght Squad 12-AUdubonWildnte 1 V-Blo Volley 6 Friday Morning Semester Zoo Revue Semester 13_Not for women Onlv 2-CBS Hews News B-CBS News 10-Today Room Fcvors Konaaroo Zoo Re.ue Slrcet Kongoroo Kangaroo Show 12-ln School 2-Jokcr'sWMd That Tune Douglas 4-Joker's Wild 6-Nome That Tune wild That Tune Street That Tune 2-Gambil 7_Winnlna Streak Farrell 4-Gamblt Streak 10-Wlnning S4reok Streak 2_NowYou See It Rollers My Children 3-AIIMv Children 4-Now You Sec It 6-High Rollers You See It 10-High Rollers 12-ln School Rollers of Life Squares Bunch 3-Brady Bunch 4-Loveof Life Squares a-LovcolLlfc Squares Squares and Restless and Restless and Rcsllcss 7-CeIebrlly Sweepstakes 9-Spllt Second 3-Spilt Second 6-ceiebrItv Sweepstakes Sweepstakes 13-Cclebrltv Sweepstakes Friday Afternoon Weather 7-Ncws, Weather 9-Evewitncis News 4-Famllv Affair Noon Edition 8-Noontimc IO-NCWS, Weather 13-ln School 13-Ncws nnd COurifry Davenport La Crtme Rochcjter Iowa City Des Moinei t the World Turns 9-Lcl's Make a Deal 3-Lct's Make a Deal As the World Turns Ihe World Turns Company 13-Movlc 2 7-Daysof Lives Gome Game Light of Lives B-Gufdlno Light of Lives School of Night 9-GirllnMyLtfe 3-Glrl In My Life 4-Edoeof Night of Night" 2-PrIce Is Right World Hospital Hospital Is Right World 8-Prlce Is Rlaht World World Game To Survive a Marriage 9-One LllcToUvo U-one LIte'lOLive Match Game To Survive a Marrlaoe 8-Match Game 10-HowTo Survive a Marriage To Survive a Marriage pyramid Pyramid 12-Moaaic 7-Room 222 Gllllgan's Island 3-Movle Mike Douglas Jeannlc B-Bcwltched Lost In Snace Flower Show Floppy Bonanza Lury Show Merv Grllltn Mike DouolttS Mis' 13-Mei 4'30 Family Squad Heroes Boono Street Dragnet 4-GHHgan's Island 7-CBS News 7-NBC News 9-ABC News 3-ABC News 4-CBSNows 6-NBC News 8-CBSNews 10-NBC News 15-Elcf.trlc Company 13-NBCNews Army Reveals My Lai Data: No Surprises WASHINGTON (AP) Sec- retary of the Army Howard Cal- laway released much of the long-secret Peers Commission report on the 1968 My Lai mas- sacre Wednesday saying the ar- my has taken steps to 'assure that "nothing like (Us happens again." Callaway released a 450-page volume of findings and conclu- sions by !i special inquiry group and a mass of documentary ma- terial, but withheld thousands of pages of testimony and criminal investigation reports. The report was submitted to Pentagon offi- cials in March 1970. Callaway said that lie does not intend to make the remaining material public because it in- cludes "hearsay, impressions, suppositions, and mere mmors" which he said could cause se- vere and irreparable damage to some persons who were found to be innocent. Koster Highest Callaway said the report showed "no evidence of any kind" that efforts to cover up the massacre went any higher than Maj. Gen. Samuel Koster, who commanded the Americal division. The My Lai massacre involved a platoon of that di- vision. The Peers group, headed by now-retired Lt. Gen. William Peers, was set up in late 1969 to investigate allegations that the My Lai taassacre was de- liberately covered up. Although the Peers group stud- ied the massacre, it was con- cerned chiefly with the cover-up aspect. Only one officer, Col. Oran Henderson, was tried by a court martial on cover-up charges. Henderson, commander of the llth infantry brigade, which in- cluded the My Lai platoon of Lt. William Calley, was acquitt- ed. He later retired. Koster was reduced in rank to brigadier general and censured. He also has retired. "Training Revised" "The release of this report concludes a dark chapter in the army's Callaway told a news conference. It is an incident from which the army has learned a great lie said. "The lessons have been acted upon. Army training has been revised to em- phasize the personal responsibil- ity o'f each soldier and officer to obey the laws of land warfare and the provisions of the Geneva and the Hague conventions." For the past four years and eight months, the army has re- fused to make public any more than 54 pages out of a total of more than which it receiv- ed in March 1970. The army's basic position has been that the report could not be made public while legal cases were still in process against various defendants. Hikes Middlemen WASHINGTON (AP) Dur- ing (he first nine months of this year the retail cost of a year's supply of farm-produced food went up from its 1973 av- erage, with higher middleman charges accounting for 84 per- cent of the increase, new fig- ures by the agriculture depart- ment showed Wednesday. A market basket of retail food 'items, enough for a theo- retical household of 3.2 persons for an entire year, averaged a record on an annual bas- is during the first three quarters of 197-1. It averaged for all of last year. 10 YEARS AGO Students who took part in anti-govern- ment street demonstrations in Saigon lost their draft exemp- tion status. Kirkwood Board Moves To Open Student Records By Judy Daubenuiicr The Kirkwood Community col- lege board of directors Wednes- day night directed its staff to come up with procedures for implementing a federal law that gives students access to the col- lege's records about him. Supt. Selby Ballanlyne told the board the law, known as the Buckley amendment, goes into effect on Nov. 19. The college has 45 days after that date to get the records ready for stu- dents to inspect if they so de- sire. The department of health, ed- ucation and welfare has not issued guidelines for carrying out the legislation, Ballantyne said, making it difficult for the college to know how to proceed. The law also prohibits release of information about the student to most third parlies without the student's written consent. Stu- dent records may be released to officials or teachers of the school the student attends or which he plans to enroll, to cer- tain state and federal officials, and hi connection with an appli- cation for financial aid. Fund Loss Failure of an institution to comply with the law means loss of. federal funds to the'institu- tion. Ballantyne said one effect of the law is that information given to the college about a student by a third party who in- tended the information to be confidential will now be avail- able to the student. "We discussed shredding (his information, but we are not going to get involved in that at he present said Ballan- tyne. "Until Nov. 19 we can destroy this information because it oelongs to the school. After Nov. 19 the file no longer belongs to Sees Soviet Threat to U.S. Missiles SHREVEPORT, La. (AP) The Pentagon's research chief said Wednesday night that Rus- sia may have achieved good enough missile accuracy to threaten destruction of U. S. and-based missiles in a sur- Drise attack. Dr. Malcolm Currie, director of defense research and engi- neering, made public important details of new Soviet missile developments as he forecast "the coming year will probably see the start of the most mas- sive deployment of new stra- tegic nuclear weapons in histo- ry'-' by Russia. "If we are to keep the risk of nuclear war at its present near- zero level, then we must move as necessary to counter these disturbing Soviet Cur- rie said in a speech prepared for a banquet in connection with the Strategic Air Command's annual bombing competition. U. S. officials long have been concerned that the Russians, whose missiles have lagged be- hind the U. S. in accuracy, would achieve an ability to knock out American missiles in their underground launch silos. Currie said the Russians are ready to deploy four new kinds of intercontinental ballistic mis- siles with warheads ranging up to the explosive power of 25 mil- lion tons of TNT, an improved missile firing submarine with a range, and a bomber with intercontinental strike reach. the institution and we must ask the student for permission to de- stroy that correspondence." Oven-ending? Board President B. A. Jensen suggsted the college might be overreacting to the legislation by trying to implement it before guidelines are issued. We have million in federal funds that they could take at a moment's notice if we don't fol- low the pointed out Bal- lantyne. The Buckley amendment also appears to be in conflict with a state law which guarantees the confidentiality of such records, Ballanlyne said. The courts would have to de- cide which law prevails if that is the case, he said. May Amend Congress may amend the law during the current session, Bal- lantyne said, since its sponsor, Sen. James Buckley Y.) feels it came out stronger than he intended-. In the meantime, said Ballan- tyne, "we must notify students and the people we serve that we ivill release the information to the individual and only ihe indi- vidual. In essence, we will comply with Ihe law." in other business, the board accepted an offer from Brown Healey and Bock architects of as the firm's shane of re- sponsibility for of con- struction omitted from Iowa hall. Additional Woik Last month, the architects told the board they had discov- ered an additional in construction which needed to be done in Iowa hall but had been left out of the original contracts. At that time, the architects of- fered to pay of the cost. The board turned down that offer and directed the staff to negotiate with the architects. The deal accepted by the Doarcl also provides that no ar- chitect's fee will be paid on the worth of additional pip- ing and wiring needed in the kitchen area. That is a savings of about additionally. The board decided not to con- tribute to the Indian Creek Nature Center for an- other year at the recommen- dation of Ballantync. The nature center last year received from Kirkwood to support its operation. In re- turn, Kirkwood students were to use the area for nature study and other activities. "Our biology and microbio- logy classes do not use said Ballanlyne. "I cannot find any- one that docs use it directly from tliis institution. I cannot r e c o m m e n d spending this The board approved further work on a proposed interna- tional trade program by voting to move the program from the investigation phase to develop- ment phase. The six-quarter program would prepare students to work in world trade areas, doing such jobs as processing export and import orders. Larry Willis, director of ca- reer education, said- the pro- gram is especially applicable to Cedar Rapids since it exports about 25 percent of all the ex- ports done in the stale of Iowa. 15 Students The program could accommo- date about 15 students each year, with a total budget of about Starting salaries would be be- tween and a year for graduates, according to Willis. In other matters, the board unanimously approved plans and specifications for a waste- water training facility to be buill on campus with the aid of a federal grant. The two-story concrete block building with brick facing will house three classrooms and a small treatment plant. It will be located east of the college's north parking lot. The facility will take sewage from the Kirkwood sewer lines, treat it, and then route it into the Cedar Rapids sewer. Estimated Cost Estimated cost of the building is belween and The plans and specifications must also be approved by the Iowa department of environ- mental quality and the Environ- mental Protection Agency in Kansas City before bids can be taken. In financial matters, the board authorized payment of in interim bills, in regular bills, and in schoolhouse bills. Certificates of payment for Iowa hall construction approved by the board included to Acme Electric; for Universal Climate Control; to Rinderknecht As- sociates, and to Mod- ern Piping. the pool, 'which is bcl on the On Oct. 9 the network said it was canceling "The- Texas Wheelers" and "Kodiak." On Wednesday, ABC added to jthe list "The New "Paner and The bombing competition in- snn w Comedy Reveue volves all bomber, tanker and The Sonny Comedy Kevcue, other SAC units in a two-week starring Sonny Bono, series of simulated combat to All are first-season programs test unit proficiency. that premiered- on ABC last Sep- An Aspin aide said that under the arrangement, SAC personnel lea.QV ,nri would "buy shares in their series and rew, UKC a looman poui. An air force .spokesman said midseason changes he would look into the allega- lion. Aspin said the betting scheme violates federal anti-racketeer- ing laws and may involve solici- tation of junior officers and en- listed men. He said he has asked the justice department, the Internal Revenue Service and the air force special inves- tigations office to look into the alleged gambling. Erred in Food Bill Statement WASHINGTON men for Clarence Adamy, president of the National Assn. of Food Chains, say he made a mistake when he said the average family would save only eight cents a week on its food bill if super markets returned all their profits to shoppers. Actually, says Adamy, profits average eight cents per-person, or 36 cents per family. Super market profits are run- auuer jnaihUL piuuus tut; iuu- ning at a little over half a cent day night series about a spe- per dollar of sales, Adamy said cial weapons and tactical team Monday. The eight-ccnt-per- on the police force of a large family figure would mean the city. It starts Feb. 17. 2" diagonal portable black white TELEVISION PHILCO M.I. in, MODEL B414BAV. Trim, colorful Avocado contemporary style cabinet with recessed handle. Features precision-crafted chassis for stable, reliable operation. Other features include highly sensitive VHF-UHF 82-channel tuning for sharp, crisp pictures, Philco Automatic Picture Pilot for picture stability, volts of picture power. High-gain Unibond safety picture tube. NOW ONLY: LIMIT: I per customer please w'OI'EX IVITKLY 'TIL BARREL'S TV Avc. Marion COLOR TV STEREO RADIOS SEE OUR FULL LINE OF ZENITH MERCHANDISE. ALL STYLES AND SIZES buy with assured Open Man. and Thurs. 8 to 9 Tuos., Wed., Frl. 8 to 5 Sat. 8 to 5 Phone 364-6127 827 Shaver Rd.N.E. __ Grow ABC Sets Replacements For 7 Shows NEW YORK (Al1) The ABC Television Network says it will Aspin: Probe SAC Betting on Bom'bing Trials WASHINGTON An in- vestigation lias been promised into charges that air force gen- erals are operating a six-figure "programs on the betting pool on the outcome of I> l year as mid- the current Strategic Air Com- y for two maiul intramural bombing com- .md Pclition- others that will be can- Rep. Aspin (D-Wis.) Wednesday be Irns received1' complaints "from men who have been pressured by their commanders to contribute to crew, like a football pool." average family food bill was under per week. it is incorrect. and lie used it inadvertently" thinking lie was referring to profits per person. noimce more cancellations and ason changes later this week. ABC said its six new mid- season series arc: "Toma" a new version of the hour-long police series ABC can- celed last year after the star, Tony Mtisante, asked out of the show. The new version stars Robert Blake, starts Jan. 10 and will appear Friday nights. "Saturday Night at the Mov- two hours of films which will start on Jan. 11. "Hot L a half- hour Thursday night comedy scries produced by Norman Lear and concerning life ina gone-to-seed hotel. Premiering on Jan. 16, it will be followed on that date by: another half-hour comedy which stars Karen Val- entine as a single career girl in Washington, D. C. "Barney starting on Jan. 19, a half-hour New York police comedy series that will be aired Sunday nights and star Hal Linden. a one-hour Mon- also premiering on that is another hour-long iiuui Questioned later, aides to police series that is set in Adamy said "with great regret. Miami and stars Stacey Kcach. Pick up the telephone and call 398-8234 to place a want ad! 9 NO MATTER how little you paid for a color television, if you can't get it fixed, right here, right now, YOU PAID.TOO MUCH! EBELING'S TY GIVES PROMPT SERVICE w SALES SERVICE SERVING CEDAR RAPIDS and MARION OVER 20 YEARS 667 11th St. t,   

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