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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Monday, November 11, 1974 - Page 23

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 11, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                 Hilltop House Furniture Store- Wide  Anniversary  A TT ¥1    J  This is your opportunity to save from 30% to 50%  IVrmultix Sola    shoo  (»«*iitiiiic leather Sofa    SMM).* 166  Thonia^vilU* l)<^k    10»)  ('.amel Hark Sula    *950    ■‘499  \ eh el Stripe Sola    *7.41    i\)0  Denim \nd Leather Sola    *B62    *603  Plaid Tapestry Sofa    >*711    !••>()  NX outward Dias* l op  I aide «N ll hair**    *191..”*0 •325  Painted Drandmnther (dock *•>«•>    * 199 •  II it»ril ( ii ( .hair    *120     14 1 99  1  ’  Permaliix llideahed    *64*1    161  Dining    Ro Sets  Red Room . . . Dinettes  Idtmps tutti Fu tures ut Special St tv inf's  Hilltop House Furniture  2821 Mount Vernon Road SU  Open Monday and Thursday Night* 'til <) p.m.  12 The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Mon., Nov. ll, 1974  AP Wirephotos  Alan Forrett, who farms 1,500 rich acres near Des Moines, inspects the effects of an early nip of frost on his soybean crop. Sure, says Forrett, the American farmer has a moral obligation to feed the hungry, “lf we produce for these countries where thousands are dying, we should have the right to expect that it should get to where it does the most good," he says.  Farm News  Anderson Seeks Better Knowledge of U.S. Farms  ROME — An Iowa farm leader says he is concerned about the position being advanced on animal agriculture at the World Food Conference being held in Rome.  Iowa Farm Bureau President J. Merrill Anderson of Newton, Iowa. said last week there appears to be a lack of understanding of the importance of efficient land use in  Adult Leaders Cited by 4-H In Winneshiek  DECORAH — Four adults have been honored for service with the Winneshiek county 4-H program.  Mrs. William Wilkens of Decorah and Lynn Daker of Calmar were named honorary 4-H members, while Mrs. Milton Hove of Decorah and Walter Langland of Spring Grove, Minn., received the 4-H alumni recognition.  Youth receiving major awards include. Leadership award. David Saquitne, Mabel, Minn., Betty Schmitt of Fort Atkinson, Gayle Hager, Castalia, and Cheryl Steffens, Decorah; citizenship award, Jeanne Leibold, Fort Atkinson, and David Groth, Spring Grove, Minn.; county champion dairy member, Linda Rausch, Fort Atkinson; and achievement award, Mayme Benson .of Ridgeway, Karen Clark of Calmar. Ann Shatek. Fort Atkinson, and Mark Sol-lien, Mabel. Minn.  Free Trip for Defeated Solons  WASHINGTON (GPI) -Reps. Robert Price (R-Texas) and Edward Young, (R-S.C.) didn’t get re-elected, but they left last week for Africa and Rome on an official trip to gather information for future legislation  The two house* agriculture committee members left with three winning Democrats, Eligio De la Garza of Texas Jerry Litton of Missouri and David R. Bowen of Mississippi.  They will visit the seven-nation Sahel area of Africa. which has been devastated by drouth, and spend five days in Rome at the World Food Conference.  Like other congressional trips, the journey was considered educational in nature to help the congressmen frame relevant legislation. There are only four weeks remaining in the term of the 93rd congress  utilizing roughages in food production..  “This roughage comes from the land that can’t be used efficiently and responsibly for grain production and from the material that would otherwise be waste,” he said.  Needs Market  Anderson said American farmers need a market for any increased production and this market must provide a price level that is an incentive, one that offers a return on their investment, time and management.  “While we talk about the need for increased production in both the developed and developing nations, we must talk frankly about who is going to pay for it,” Anderson said  “It is extremely expensive to produce fwd in the United States, requiring substantial investment in land and machinery plus rapidly increasing seed, pesticide and fertilizer costs.”  Who W ill Pay?  Anderson said American farmers need a market for any increased production and this market must provide a price level that is an incentive, “one that offers a return on their investment, time and management.”  “We have more questions than answers at this stage of the conference. Who will provide the incentives needed? Who and how will this increased production be transported 9  Who will pay for the food?" Anderson asked.  Cattlemen Call For Probe of Meat Margins  WASHINGTON (GPI) -The American National Cattlemen's Assn. called on President Ford last week to help find out why beef prices remain high in supermarkets despite a strong supply in stockyards and on ranches  In a letter to Ford, ANCA President Gordon Van Vleck said the President should help determine if retailers have increased profit margins on beef to an unwarranted degree.  The letter said conflicting statements by government, beef industry and consumer spokesmen on the question of nieat prices and profits have caused confusion among both cattlemen and consumers and have increased public distrust of the entire food production and marketing system.  Poor Farmers Key To World Food Problem  By John Barbour  AP Nowsfeotures Writer  Barefoot, his shirt knotted about his lean waist. Arnulfo Salas guides his plow through 7*2 acres of sandy, volcanic soil  He farms the way his father did before him. on the same land, with the same plow, behind the same tired horse.  Yet Arnulfo Salas, 27, father of four children, is the unlikely hope of the hungry world  A lot of important people Arnulfo doesn t know are meeting in Rome this month at the United Nations World Food Conference. They are talking about Arnulfo and the HK) million other small farmers who tend SII percent of the world’s farms and are the best answer to the world's food problems.  His  World  Arnulfo wouldn’t care. This is his world, a personal stake in Mexico’s Atoyac river valley between the slopes of the ancient volcanoes. Popacateptl, Ixtaccihuatl and La Malinche.  The Aztecs coaxed food out of the nitrogen-poor soil 7.IMH) years ago, fertilizing with human excrement and fish bones. Arnulfo uses chemical fertilizer, but sparingly and inefficiently.  His corn is thin, they would say in Iowa. Ile will reap some 210 bushels from acreage that would produce nearly SOO bushels in Iowa.  Arnulfo could — by using more fertilizer and readily available technical help — double his production. Ile chooses not to. Maybe next year, he says.  Ile is the prototype of the subsistence farmer the world over, a captive of his culture, his fears. He produces on his 15 acres or less only what he needs. He feeds his family, his hogs, few of his countrymen.  The Arnulfos and their families are 700 million of the world’s 3.8 billion population, and 70 percent of the population in the developing countries.  The world is waiting for them.  Waiting For Arnulfo  An American Dilemma » ;-«* %  than 25 to 30 percent of it leaves the farm wile it was grown.  In Mexico, too, malnutrition is rampant. Half the babies born will not live to their fifth year; 30 percent will die before their first birthday. In Mexico and elsewhere, it has come to that.  In India, small farmers hold HO percent of the rain-fed land. Yet they produce only 30 percent of the rice. In India every year millions either die or are left wasted by malnutrition.  The problems, almost everyone agrees, are cultural, social. economic, governmental. The small farmer is capable of far more. How do vou conv ince him to do it?  Only Viable Solution  Increasing their production is the “only viable long-term solution to the world food problem,” says a I N report prepared for the World Food Conference, which aliened Nov. 5 and ends next Sunday.  Every year, the world has 78 million new mouths to feed. American and other modern farmers, producing near to capacity, cannot do the job. I S. government stockpiles, once used to feed millions of hungry, are gone today. And so. in America, when a housewife reaches for a loaf of bread on a supermarket shelf, she is in direct and unequal competition with a starving child somewhere in the world — a competition that is driving up her food prices.  She, too, has a stake in the farm of Arnulfo Salas. It has come to that  If only Arnulfo would, he could double or treble his output, produce new anil more varied crops, feed his fellow people in crowded Mexico City 30 miles away, and other cities where people hunger  Butz’  Ideas  Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz, who heads the I’. S. delegation to the Rome conference, has his own ideas:  “This is a basic problem in India and elsewhere because they continue to have a cheap food policy. Perhaps the Indian farmer can’t read, but he can figure. They’re not stupid. They can get a better price somewhere else and the wheat doesn t come out. It stays in the granary, or it goes into the black market.  “Ambassador Pat Moynihan was in this office . . . discussing this very thing. It just never leaves the villages, and they eat pretty well out there, at least in terms of how they eat in Calcutta . .  “The world’s crying need is to get farmers everywhere to produce. You don't do that by putting a ceiling price over their head . .”  Rockefeller  Report  A Rockefeller Foundation report agrees: "Before a farmer can be expected to produce more than enough to feed his own family — before he can be encouraged to move from subsistence to commercial farming, he has to have a price for his product that makes the additional labor worthwhile.”  But the closer you get to “how the more complex Hu  problem becomes.    ,    .  Astolfo Fumagulli, general manager of Guatemala s  Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology, wrestles  with the “how?”  "They have been doing it their way for many centuries  They just don’t think of the future. But we must depend nil them and they must change. I believe this is a cultural pattern all over the world  “They belong to the past. We must change that Things are improving for the small farmer. His prices  are rising.  For years in Mexico, a leader in land redistribution, the small farmer was a slave to the local corn buyer who set the price. Then the government established a chain of regional stores, buying grain at an official price, setting a price floor  Dozens of Experiments  There are dozens of experiments. In El Salvador there are new prospering farm cooperatives. In India the government seeks to break the hold of loan sharks on small tanners. In Brazil concerted efforts by the government and American experts have revitalized one state that now produces over HH percent of Brazil’s wheat.  But most changes are as much cultural as technological. Just outside of San Lucas el Grande, a .Mexican town of 4.000, Margarite Juarez Garcia. 32, farms 7*2 acres.  For years he followed the local practice, spacing his corn plants a yard apart, fertilizing sparsely. Today he plants his corn 20 inches apart, fertilizes better. His yield has trebled.  Now he has corn to sell on the open market. Now he is building a new home for his wife and four children He also  has left some old ways behind  In almost every poor country, the campesino or his counterpart is not prepared to extend his loyalty beyond his family, nor to open himself to criticism from outsiders, be they neighbors or strangers.  Jarez Garcia did both. He joined the Puebla Plan, started by the Rockefeller Foundation, now run by Mexico's postgraduate college of agriculture  Unlock Local Credit  Working together the farmers have managed to unlock local credit, lower interest rates from 18 percent to 7.5. buy their lertilizer as a group, even buying it from afar when local supplies were scarce.  I he largest hurdle is fear. Simon Williams, a New York-born consultant who has studied the small farmer all over the world says, "When we ask these guys to change their planting. we re asking them to risk their lives.”  It means also getting used to the idea of money.  The ll. N report says the Arnulfos of the world must play the major role in increasing the average annual growth rate of food production. During the next 12 years, it must go up at least one percent from the present 2.6 percent. If it doesn’t, says the I N report, then the developing countries face annual food deficits of 85 to HK) million tons. That deficit would In* twice the entire U. S. wheat harvest this year.  In Mexico half the land is planted in corn. Yet riot more  Leader Banquet  FAYETTE - Mary Ob-erbroeckling, a former state 4-H president, will speak at the Fayette county 4-H leader recognition and award night banquet at 7:30 p m. Nov. 16 in Garber hall at Upper Iowa university here.  ON THIS DATE in 1888 Washington was admitted to the union as the 42nd state  FINAL DAYS  OF OUR BIG  lith MONTH  SAVINGS SALE  SAVE NOW ON QUALITY MAJOR APPLIANCES!  • Refrigerators  • Ranges  • Dishwashers  • Washers and Dryers  • Color Television  frirvtt if ou‘ct* boon trail tuff for...plan ah vail for ThanliMffirinff anil I brim man  NOW through THURSDAY  General Electric Frigjdaire  Shop Monday and Thursday nights ’til 9 and alt day Saturday  106 Second Ave. SW ^ Phone 363-0283 West End of the Second Avenue Bridge   

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