Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 11, 1974 - Page 2

Share Page

Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 11, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Kapids Gazette: November 11, 'Squeeze Is on' To Cut TV Production Time (Continued from Page 1.) placed tho business in an acute crisis situation. That crisis-time is here is a sentiment felt by every pro- duction firm in the business. According to some, it's al- ready beginning to affect the quality bf the product. Award-winning producer Richard Levinson Ire ports, "The squeeze is 0n us to cut down on production time because time means money." When Levenson and partner William Link made the Em- my-winning 'TV film "My Sweet Charlie" with Patty Duke six years ago, "We had a week for rehearsals. "When we made 'That pertain Sum- mer' two years ago, we had two-days rehearsal time. Now we have none we barely have time to film the script. Last year (we were given 21 days to produce 'The Execu- tion of Private-Slovik'. 'The Gun' a TV movie we made this fall had to be rushed through Jiroduction in a week and a half." Even- with savagely slashed shooting schedules, the long- form dramatic show has be- come a gigantic loser for the studios. Networks will teubsi- dize a television movie for some to less than it costs the studio to make it. To Icover the differ- ence, the istudio must go into deficient financing and wait until the network has had a chance to air the feature twice (for a taaximum period of 18 months) before they feet the negative back and can hope to pay back interest and princi- pal on the original loan through syndication Bale or overseas theatrical release. "We are definitely at a cris- is agrees Frank Price, President of Universal Studios Television. "At this time pro- ducing 1'irms tire simply not making deals with networks won't until the networks come up with money figures that make sense. Something must be done, because the suppliers are in. Jjad shape, and the networks must [realize that to maintain quality we need more money, not less. There's no way we can knake a series like 'Kojak' for less than we're making it now. Un- less the situation eases, the only solution will be to shift to shows that require less pro- duction." And so, ias it looks now, tel- evision could Jje sliding swiftly from a state of dreary to dreadful. Variety shows will flood the tube next yealr be- cause variety shows are cheap. And [cheaper than va- riety offers are Iquiz shows and game shows and panel shows like "To Tell the Truth" and "Mike Stokey's House Where It Began Which is where, conceivably, home entertainment could end up if times get bad enough, back to where it all began several decades ago when TV was an infant and the net- turning. The public is reject- ing new shows tot a faster rate 'than they ever Slave be- fore and facts and figures indicate they'll bo rejecting TV products even faster in up- coming months (as television feels the effect of the econom- ic 'pinch. The public is finding there is an alternative to watching bad TV: 'good movies. A world-wide love affair with motion pictures has begun and from the (way things look now it could conceivably be the big screen side of the in- dustry that once again keeps Hollywood afloat. From the way that big screen side is currently acting, and react- ing lo the (recession by throw- ing money about, you'd think that day was already here. Tuesday on Gazette Enter- tainment Pages Part HI: The good new days of Holly- wood. Those Who've got it are spending it and retail busi- nesses that cater to the stars are reporting i a bannerline year. works were grasping lo find direction for a form that was to grow within 25 years into the most powerful communi- cator ever known to mankind. that would find more than 250 million sets around the world in 1974, and a potential TV 'audience over 900 mil- lion persons that would reach a state where a situa- tion comedy in the Fam- would be seen in 'a Week by more people than had seen the most popular motion pic- ture of all time God- during its three-year run in theaters around the world. We've come to take for grant- ed such things as satellite coverage of news and sport- ing events, penetrating inves- tigative documentaries, multi- million dollar long-form pro- ductions isuch as "The (Auto- biography of Miss Jane Pitt- man" and "QB-VIII" such spe c t a c u 1 a r programming treats interspersed between the daily diet of bland video fare that pays ,the network's bills. Golden Era Such gourmet video fare, some studio heads predict, could be on the way out and, far-out :as it seems by 1975 we might' be looking back upon the lackluster season of 1974 with yearning, and refer- ring to it as the Golden Era of TV broadcasting when long-form dramas were a reg- ular part of the TV diet. A generation has been weaned on television, molded by its messages, and state- ments blared into the typical American home for six and a quarter hours each day. Now, however, the trend could be Scott: U. S. in Recession, Ford Should Admit It PHILADELPHIA ate Minority Leader Hugh Scott Monday said he believes the U.S. is in 'a recession and he does not understand why I the White House is reluctant to ad- mit it. Dole: Ford Must Stop Inflation To Win in 76 WASHINGTON (AP) Pros, idcnt Ford must solve the na- tion's economic problems if he hopes to avoid a possible chal- lenge for the Republican presi- dential nomination in 1976 and then go on to win the election, says former GOP chairman Sen. Dole "If President Ford can suc- ceed in helping the economy, in )ringing down inflation, he's joing to be tough to beat in Dole said Sunday on the IBS program, "Face the Na- ion." He also said Ford will have to "toughen up a little between now'and '76. I'think he has sort of a Boy Scout image." What is needed is "leader- ship, making the tough deci- sions, taking the congress on if he must, whether we're Repub- licans or Dole ad- ded. He also predicted there will be cabinet changes in the near future, saying, "Many (cabinet members) plan to leave in the spring." He did hot elaborate. Meanwhile, Senator-elect John 31enn (D-Ohio) said on the MBC program "Meet the Press1 that he did not view the in- crease in Democratic control of congress as "any huge Demo- cratic mandate to take over the country "It was repudiation of some of Hie lliings they had seen go- ing on last said Glenn. In another development, Cali- fornia Gov. Reagan said in an interview with "U.S. News World Report" that he would not run as a third party presi- dential candidate in 1976. Lawyer: Calley Feels Rights Unit: U.S. Agencies Army Discharge Void COLUMBUS, Ga. (AIJ) W Ham Calley, free on bail and u likely to be confined ever aga for the My Lai murders, st considers liimself a lieutenant the U.S. army, his lawye say. Calley, 31, was released on h own recognizance Saturday b Judge J. Robert Elliott, th same judge who two monti earlier liad overturned Calley conviction for killing 22 Vie namcso civilians at My Lai 19S8. i His lawyers said Sunday th, Galley's next legal step will b future claims he may have on result of his court-martial cor viclion and should be voidei because the conviction overturned. "The dismissal was a direc result of liis conviction; the con victlon was unconstitutional therefore, it would appear tha all things proceeding from the conviction are likewise uncon said J. Houstot Gordon, one of Calley's law yers. Gordon said Sunday that Cal !ey will 'give the army a chanc< :o call him back to active duty sefore he seeks other employ ment to avoid prejudicing any to inform the army this week back pay, benefits or damages that he still considers himself lieutenant in the U.S. army an is available for duty. Voided Discharge The. army discharged Calle !or three years in jail on a con viction which later was re- versed. If Calley ultimately is clearec by higher courts, Gordon said il almost definite Calley will "I think that one can only andidly say that live are in a Scott said in an in- erview in the Pittsburgh Post- lazette. "I can't quite understand the White House reluctance to ac- tually call this what it Scott told the Post-Gazette. "I think the sooner we admit it's a re- cession the earlier we have a chance to get out of (it, because the existence of the fact pre- sents the necessity for the solu- tions." Scott, who celebates his 74th birthday Monday, Said if Presi- dent Ford Sand congress sucess- fully cooperate on Ihe problem 'We should see the rate of in- flation fall from 11% percent perhaps 'to 8 or 8% percent sometime in the quarter of next year." The newspaper quoted Scott as saying the international o i 1 shortage was "probably the most important domestic fac- tor." He said the three major causes of the current inflation were the costs of the Vietnam war, the quadrupling of Ihe cost of energy by the Arab nations and "the fact Democratic con- gresses over all this (period have not only been spendthrift but have created enormous imposed obligations to spend." Mud Slide Kills Five Miners JOHANNESBURG, South Afri- ca of tons of mud Monday washed down a shaft at the Impala Platinum mine, the world's second big- gest, killing at least seven min- ers, a company spokesman said. A spokesman said the dead in- cluded two white miners and "not less than" Ifivc black min- ers, but he denied reports that to miners were trapped. An Impala official said the slime poured into the shaft after heavy rains caused a dam to burst at 'the1 mine in Bafokeng, near Rustenburg 100 miles from last spring. But his lawyers con- take legal action seeking back Fail To Combat WASHINGTON (AP) prohibiting federal agencies have failed to censces from dis carry out their responsibility employment practices FCC's enforcement program result has been "highly sion the report said. reports covering 30 government agencies as a sequel to the com- mission's 1970 study of eliminate employment' discrimi- nation in the industries they regulate, the U.S. Civil Bights Commission said Monday. The study covers the Federal Communications Commission, the Interstate Commerce Com- mission, the Civil Aeronautics Board, the Federal Power Com- mission and the Securities andj Exchange Commission. "Highly Inadequate" Of the five, only the FCC has even acknowledged its responsi- agency, bility of requiring regulated in- The ICC, CAB, FPG and SliC dustries to end job discrimi- "appear to assume tneir i nation against women and dependent regulatory s t a 1 u members of minority groups, allows them to stand above tm. specificity and are not jrcsull the commls- dling of employment discrimi- is Hie first of six nation complainls is also inade- quale. "License renewal reviews of and television stations' nploymcnt patterns arc used j.....-- rights enforcement, this licensees with severe the fourth such followup by Ihe of Civil Rights Commission, itself independent government he study said. national commitment to equal ic ocuu. j.m.w---- ?j Although the FCC has adopted employment opportunity he Rand: Gasoline report said. "This commission :inds their position neither le- gally nor morally justifiable." here. The official said the mud caused "considerable damage" to surface installations. Kleindienst Says He Represents Algeria in U.S. WASHINGTON Atty. Gen. Kleindienst says he is employed to represent the in- .erests of Algeria in the U.S. Kleindienst, who has practiced aw since his resignation in April 1973, serves as "legal counsel for business circles, con- gressional relations and rela- :ions with the various bfficial 'overnment bodies in Washing- ,on, D.C., and the rest of the United according to documents on file in the justice department. Agents for foreign powers are required to register with (he de- partment. Algeria has 'maintained no diplomatic relations with the U.S. since the J967 Arab-Israeli var. Kleindienst said his Algerian vork is shared jointly with ormer Defense Secretary Ciark Clifford. Kleindienst declined to say low much he was paid, but the Chicago Daily News reported liis 'ee was S120.000 a year, plus a annual expense account. Farm Exports Hike Billion WASHINGTON (UPI) The 'ise in agricultural prices pushed the value of U.S. farm exports 'n the first four months of fiscal 1975 lo a new record of bil- ion despite a volume reduction n shipments of nearly 10 per- cent. The agriculture department aid Monday the dollar value of exports for the quarter was up 1 percent from a year earlier, and all of the increase was due !o higher prices. Million NEA Campaign Gifts WASHINGTON (UPI) The National Education Assn. said Monday that it spent more than million on this fall's elcc- lions, that four but of every five candidates backed by teachers were elected, and that it ex- pected a pro-education congress. The NEA said 229 out of 2S2 teacher-backed candidates were elected to the house and 21 of 23 teacher-supported senators. The NEA said this adds at least 46 "friends of education" in the house and provides a po- tential vote of 290, enough lo override presidential vetoes on school issues, said the 1.5 mil- lion-member teacher organiza- tion. Say Smoking Parents May Endanger Infants LONDON chances of infants contracting pneu- bronchitis in llieir of life are nearly moma or firsl year doubled if bolh their parents smoke, according to research by a team of British doctors. "A picture has emerged of a serious risk to infants in the first year of life from exposure to their parents' cigaret the doctors reported in the current issue 'of the Lancet, a medical journal. 48 Die as Rival Black Groups Clash in Angola LUANDA, Angola black independence groups clashed with .bach other and se- curity forces in Luanda over the weekend 'and hospitals reported at least 48 persons killed and more than 100 wounded. Moscow Fire MOSCOW (UPI) Fire swept through the Moscow bureau of United Press International early Monday, causing considerable damage to the office and equip- ment but no injuries. tend that the discharge allowances "and anything else to which he may be Best industries which are regulated by the ICC, CAB, FPC Germans Kenneth Henson another Calley lawyer, said SEC "have severe problems of underemployment and un- Judge's has no desire to go into the army "as far as I MONICA, Calif. (AP) The only way to cut of minority group members and the BERLIN (AP) Police significantly without said. "In most searching Monday for about hal a dozen members of a gang who shot to death Guenter von Drenkmann, Berlin's top judge at his home Sunday night. Authorities said the gunmen may have intended to kidnap )renkmann, the 64-year-old president of the city's highest Fifth Court of Appeals in rew Orleans will consider in February the army's appeal of le reversal of Calley's court martial conviction. 'Both sides say they will go to the U.S. supreme court if they lose at le appellate during the next four years is o increase its price, mainly by taxation, a new Rand report says. The report released Thursday said higher taxes would have the most impact on persons earning less lhan who rive their cars to work. their employment patterns are significantly worse han those found in other sec-ors of American industry." The ICC regulates railroads, truckers and bus companies, the CAB regulates airlines and the FPC regulates some utilities such as electric and gas. and shot him in a Struggle when le Gordon, noting that the army plans to parole Calley who headed the research team, said the Under-Represenlation Police said they could not exclude, the possibility that the shooting was connected with 19, says, "even if the appeals court overturns Elliott's eversal, Calley will might want to establish some means to reduce the commission found minorities and females especially excluded from high-wage truck death of a leftist prisoner here on Saturday. The prisoner, Hol-ger Meins, 83, a member of the Baader-Meinhof gang, died have to face Meanwhile, his lawyers say lat Calley plans to settle greatest potential for fue savings "short of very high taxes" will come from jobs and said "in no other category of employment is the under-rcpresentation of minorities more evident than in the a two-monfh-Iong hunger Columbus, an army engine and classification" of the air- to protest cruelty by prison authorities. Authorities said Meins' Ft. Benning, where "no ne considers him unusual." lenson said, "He just wants the report said. The Rand Corp. Of industries regulated by the ICC and CAB, the commission was from the effects of his feting although he had been left alone lo live the life of i ordinary which spent a year on the study said lower prices on "the transportation industry alone offers substantial cially army offered at cars would encourage drivers to trade in- their old for entreprc- Thai Guards Fire On Prisoners BANGKOK Guards s bail hearing to put Calley n immediate parole status, arlier, Army Secretary How-d Callaway had announced he anned to parole Calley Nov. 9, the date on which he to effect large gasoline savings. Not only would the cars cost less to buy, but they would be cheaper to run. The report said the automo-silc consumes more than half by minority group members and females. Entry into this field requires relatively low capital investment." The securities industry regu-ted by the SEC "has a poor Thailand's lard Yao prison Monday opened fire on completed one-third of his duced 10-year fuel used for transportation n thp TT in the employment of minority groups generally and in who staged a demonstration wanted to Ulc U, employment of women in demand general the army would above the clerica A UPI photographer said over Calley if he the study said. many as 30 prisoners may Army attorney Wash. been said it would and new patrol hydrofoil Specificity The demonstration was shook his ship, Pegasus, was commission's 250-page re- to protest a government the judge freed over the weekend with focused mainly on the FCC, :o grant amnesty in honor personal recognizance christening by regulates broadcasters, the promulgation of of bond, Vickery Potter, wife of the TV, telephone companies new constilution in October. "Calley is not of the other fields of electronic similar demonstration was an I ho will nnfi h -if'nn whilp nnisitlfT ducted at Bangkok's other Nov. 19. The army YEARS AGO FCC's anti-bias rules, the on, Bang Kwang, for the over Calley rocket experts said: guidelines defining the FBI Nabs One 10 Most VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. inside, Coneys said. IBrigham Young university as a bungalow and all but of FBI agents raided a home went to the front enforcement major, money was recovered. a quiet middle class Walker drove away to 45 years in and McCoy, along borhood late Saturday night, captured one of the nation's house to survey the the April, 1972, skyjacking two other convicts, escaped from the exercise yard of the nosl-wanted criminals opened the front United Air Lines prison Aug. 10. Prison tilled a prison escapee who at that point an agent said McCoy used said the men comman- years ago skyjacked an himself and told to commandeer a garbage truck and, ind bailed out with hold it and then to come on a flight from a barrage of gunfire, he Utah J., to Los Angeles, after it through two chain link The skyjacker, Richard about a split second in Denver. The plane to a public road. VIcCdy, 31, was shot and his revolver. He got to San Francisco four abandoned the truck vhcn he pulled a gun and off and the agent in ransom was 15 miles from the prison, iring after agents It blasted him right out were allowed up two women and a man hemselvcs, the FBI the plane and a farmhouse and stole a car. Arrested was Melvin Dale Valker, 35, who was on placed on board. The pilot vas then ordered to fly a Walker and McCoy made ;ood their escape. The other agency's 10-most-wanted said McCoy's shot over the Northwest convicts were captured a ind had escaped with wall inside the house bailed out near time later. minorities um. women, but the. criteria used to identify these stations are overly restrictive and ig- nore several important factors." The report complained that the FCC makes no distinction between stations which operate in areas where minority-group members make up a relativity high percentage of the labor market and those stations in areas with lower minority rep- resentation in the labor market. Court Ruling The commission noted the low ownership of broadcast stations by minority group members and urged the FCC io change its rules in conformity with a re- cent supreme court ruling. That ruling upheld a lower court de- cision that the agency must take into consideration the fact that, in a community with a signifi- cant minority population, one of the competing applicants for a broadcast station was partly owned by minorities. "Similar consideration should be given to competing applica- tions which are filed by the commission said. It said "the focus of efforts by ICC and CAB to ensure non- discrimination in the services provided by the industries they regulate continues lo be pri- marily complaint oriented." By contrast, the FPC has de- veloped a program of special reviews of the water recrea- tional facilities of hydroelectric projects "to determine minority usage in addition to yearly re- views of such facilities. Thse reviews, however, are limited in numbers and, although low mi- writy utilization rates have been identified at. various proj- ects, FPC has initiated no cor- rective action. Theft in Office Breakin A breakin at the Dave Schmill Construction Co. office, 250 Fif- tieth avenue SW, over the week- end resulted in 'a loss of worth of equipment. Police said thieves entered Ihe building by throwing a rock hrough the office window. Desks and filing cabinets were pried open and ransacked. Items taken included a electric typewriter, tools, and 150 in cash. rom ithe federal prison at Lew- sburg, Pa., in August. FBI spokesman John Coneys said McCoy, a former Mormon Sunday school teacher who served as a Green Beret in Viet- lam, was killed as he entered a house he and Walker had rented near the Virginia Beach ocean- front. Received Tip Coneys said federal agents and Virginia Beach police had tha house slaked out for (wo days after receiving a lip the Iwo men were occasionally slay- ing there. McCoy and Walker arrived at the house about p.m. Sal- before he was able to fire again Utah. he was struck by a single shot- McCoy was arrested three Marion Man Held For Stealing Car A Marion man was being held n Linn county jail under )ond after he was arrested Sun- day night for larceny of a motor vehicle. Richard K. Gordon, 18, of 700 Thirty-fifth street, Marion, was arrested on 0 avenue NW when officers saw a car coasting with ts lights off and stopped to in- vestigate. When officers called the sta- ion to check 'the registration, he owner of Ihe car, Larry Vithercll, 3225 0 avenue NW, vas calling to .report it stolen. gun blast. Meanwhile, Coneys said, Walker was driving back to the house, but he took off at high speed when he heard' the shoot- ing. "Two units pulled him over at Coneys said. "He had two loaded weapons in the car, but he chose to surrender." Skyjacking Agents said an arsenal of rifles and pistols was found at the house, rented by McCoy in September. They said McCoy had used stolen credit cards as references in renting the house, attended days later at his rented Provo urday, unaware that FBI agents DR. CRAVEN DENTIST PRACTICE UMITED TO DENTURE WORK 1 111 it SE, Cedar RopnJt, la. Momal Mmon City Siou< Cily Subaru offersl 2 mos. warranty with Bat so modi more in74. For details call anytimu for a recorded mossafjfi. we can't make you drive safely It's something you have to want to do. but stop and think for a second. Every time you get be- hind the Wheel, lives are at stake. Yours, too. We insure them, but we'd rather save them. INSURANCE 701 MNB Phone 362-3030 Finest Quality Birthstone Mother's Ring To signify family love1' and unity. S95 with 1 stone for each additional stone _____ vVor_eoj0JdVhi'0 bands birthslone of the month will wear it with ajl unu cncrisli it forever. Order Your Mother's Ring for Christmas. Use Our Layaway Plan Now. Open Tonight 'til 9   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication