Sunday, November 10, 1974

Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 10, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa WEST SIDE SHOPPING CENTER !Sew Look at Progress, Deadlines (In Section A) 19 ON ALL-METRO TEAM Playera Named from 7 Schools (In Section D) Section A Weather Chance of rain today, Hearing tonight, fair tomorrow, highs in 50s, lows in 30s Ccitt (techie IVnpitU (Day *44* CITY FINAL 35 CENTS VOL* MF 92 - NUMBER 305 CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER IO, 1074 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES , Sx , X-x-S;%%»:X7XTX;XS:X*X"X‘X<-x , x , x*x-x-xw#x*x-X‘X*X-X’X’X-X-X*X'X-x*x*ft Union Chieftains, Industry Heads See Good Chance for Settlement Kissinger Optimistic After Trip WASHINGTON (AP) - Secretary of State Kissinger arrived home Saturday, confident that his 17-nation trip has opened the way toward agreement with the Soviet Union to limit nuclear weapons and improved chances for peace in the Middle East Newsmen atxiard Kissinger’s jet were told that the first four days in Moscow may have been the most productive See Pressure On Gibson in T White House WASHINGTON (UPI) -The White House is pressuring Andrew Gibson to withdraw voluntarily as President Fords nominee to head the Federal Energy Administration, but Gibson is balking because he wants to defend his reputation, administration sources said Saturday. President Ford apparently wants to avoid the embarrassment of canceling the nomination himself, preferring to make it appear that Gibson bowed out to avoid a battle with the senate Under a severance agree ment with a subsidiary of Cities Service. Gibson will re reive SKH,(HIO a year for the nest Kl years from the oil company. Nothing is illegal about the agreement, but senate criticism that Gibson might be tempted to compromise important energy deci-sions has already started. One White House source said he would be “surprised if the nomination ever goes to the senate," which ends an election recess Nov in White House Press Secretary Hon Nessen said friday that the Gibson nomination was “being reviewed diligently " Under questioning, he refused to state flatly that Ford was firmly behind the nomination Ford was spending the weekend at Camp David Gibson said late Friday night that (Continued Page 3, Col I > part of the 26,800-mile journey Chances for a treaty by the time Soviet Leader Leonid Brezhnev and President Ford hold their summit meeting in Washington next summer were said to he at least 50-50. Kissinger will report today to the President at Camp David. Md. He will spend much of this week planning this month’s trip by him and Ford to Japan. South Korea and Vladivostok, the Soviet Union’s main eastern port. Guidelines Expected Ford and Brezhnev will Today s Chuckle Adolescence is when children start bringing up their parents. Copyright •X-XvX'l-X'X-XvX-X-XvX-X'XvX-XvX'X-X meet at Vladivostok on Nov 23-24. when thev are expected to settle on guidelines for negotiations in Geneva to i/ro-duce a 10-year arms limitation treaty. The current pact expires in 1077. Although there has been no official announcement, Kissinger may go from Vladivostok to China under the current policy of keeping Peking leaders informed on major I.S.-Soviet decisions He last visited the Chinese c apital a year ago. After Kissinger left Moscow for the Indian subcontinent. Europe and back to the* Middle East. the Soviets began a propaganda campaign in favor of renewed Middle East peace talks in Geneva and forcing a decision on the Palestinian issue. U S. officials saw this as a new obstructionist tactic to upset Kissinger’s strategy of postponing the Geneva talks and shelving the Palestinian issue in favor of an Israeli-Arab settlement in stages. Despite the Soviet moves, the Arabs and Israelis reportedly gave Kissinger a goahead to continue with his strategy. There were no visible results, but American officials said none had been expected. Israeli Change They seemed pleased in what Kissinger reportedly saw as a change in the Israelis’ attitude toward the* endorsement by Arab leaders of the Palestine Liberation Organization as the spokesmen for Palestinians in the Jordanian West Bank Calm has overtaken the Israelis’ first 1 panicky reaction, the officials said, and a diplomatic impasse was averted. WASHINGTON (AP) -Leaders of the* United Mine Workers and the coal industry said they made progress in contract negotiations Saturday while many coal mines operated overtime in the last weekend tiefore a strike* The strike* is scheduled to begin when the current contract expires midnight Monday. Even if an agreement is reached this weekend. I MW President Arnold Miller has said that a strike* would last at le*ast two weeks to Pope Blasts Rich Nations' Food Policies ROME (AP) - Pope Paul VT assailed rich nations at the* World Food Conference on Saturday, accusing them of imposing birth control <»n the* poor to keep them poor U. S. and other delegates disagreed “It is inadmissible that theise who have control of the wealth and resources of mankind should try to solve the problem of hunger by forbidding the poor to In* horn," the Pope said in a speech issued by the Vatic an He attacked what he* called the rich nations’ “irrational and one-sided campaign against demographic growth," and said hunger is not man s “inevitable destiny." The Pope said the rich nations don’t give enough in food aid and also attempt “to impose a restrictive demographic policy on nations to ensure that they will not claim their just share of the earth’s goods." “We know the Pope s policy on birth control," a Norwegian delegate remarked “While we respect his views, we disagree with him. We are for giving birth control aid “Population control will help ease the* food crisis " a Thai delegate said A member of the I’. S. delegation said “there was nothing new’’ in the Popes speech, “Our difference with the Holy See is clear allow 120 OOO union members in 25 state's to vote on any tentative pac t Real Progress When the- talks adjourned Saturday evening with plans to resume Sunday morning. chief industry negotiator Guy Farmer said. “We have made real progress. There are no issues that can’t he resolved " Farmer said it was unlikely an agreement would be reached Sunday but that it was possible a new contract could be tentatively settled by the strike deadline Miller said both sides we*re drafting contract language and narrowing the issues “We’re making progress." Miller said Asked if the* talks could bog down in a stalemate. Miller said, “I don’t see any indication of that now Honing Down"* Another union official said both sides were “honing down the remaining issues " He added. “We’re still not hovering on the brink of a settlement Farmer said earlier that the mine operators had agreed in principle on some type* of cost of liv ing escalator Hauser but not on the details. Union    spokesmen said the other major unresolved issues include*    wages. grievance procedures, pensions, sick pay, aid    to disabled miners and widows and some safety demands About    500 young persons identifying themselves as members of the Workers Action Movement demonstrated in front of the White House and within view of the hotel where the negotiations were taking place They said they were demonstrating about ‘30 (Continued: Page 3, Col. 2) Weinberger Keeps Lid On HEW Budget Plan G-Men Led to Bomber Suspect By Duck Call PORTLAND. Orc*. (UPI) — FBI agents usc*d a direction finder beamed on radio code messages blown on a duck call to lead them to a couple arrested in connection with a $1 million extortion plot, the agency said Saturday. David Windsor Heesch and his wife, Sheila, both 34. were arrested Friday evening in their car on the Portland outskirts The two are charged with sending a letter in which a threat was made to black out the* city of Portland if Bonneville Power Administration did not pay $1 million. Eleven high voltage power transmission line towers in Oregon had been damaged by dynamite blasts before the letter was received Julius Mattson, FBI agent in charge, said agents were (Continued Page 3. Col. 3) WASHINGTON (AP) -Caspar Weinberger, secretary of health, education and welfare, is trying to keep secret his blueprint for reducing HEW spending by $3 billion to $4 billion a year. The ( aliforma conservative, according to aides, has prepared and delivered to President Ford a budget-slashing paper offering several options. Until the President makes his decision, however, Weinberger won I disclose the options. Ile turned down a newsman’s request to discuss specifics. The secretary’ authorized his press spokesman to say only that the proposed reductions were “in excess of $3 billion" and were aimed primarily at deferred spending, rather than elimination of programs. There is little optimism that congress will buy the HEW plan l*ss Disposed Weinberger has said previously that the more heavily liberal Democratic congress moving in next January will be* even less disposed to reduce social welfare spending than the present congress, which took only nibbles at the HEW budget instead of the $1 billion bite that the administration had requested. Still, the need to trim the HEW budget was stressed at a White* House* briefing Friday by Budget Director Roy Ash. Ash said the biggest recent inc reuses in federal spending have involved "income-transfer" programs including Happy Days in Hollywood (Editor s Note — While inflation, shortages and recession envelop the world outside, the magic hamlet of Hollywood is enjoying today like there is no tomorrow. In o three-part series Hollywood s top reporter, Marilyn Beck, describes the new and incredible boom in the movie industry which was so recently on the verge of bankruptcy. Readers will find sharp insights, startling tidbits and quotes from industry leaders who will determine the shape of tomorrow s entertainment both on the wide screen and the home TV set.) By Marilyn Beck The setting was the Bel Air estate of Producer Sidney Sheldon, where a star-studded guest list of nearly UMI dined alfresco upon a patio overlooking formal gardens, tennis courts and swimming pool During cocktail hour one woman captured my attention with the statement "Did you read that two out of each three cans of dog food sold are used for human consumption? I really think the government should do something about the situation " And over dinner, the wile of a motion picture studio chieftain made it apparent she was tuned Into the traumatic times bv declaring. "It s simply terrible nowadays. You give an interior decorator a budget of $250,000 — and you can expect him to come back and ask for another $100,000 before the job is done." To be sure. there are plenty in Hollywood closer in touch to the* harsh realities of the times, bul there is still such an abundanc e of spending that 1974 is chalking up as a record year for retail stores and serv ice firms catering to a show business clientele For happy days are here again in Hollywood For some they ’re much better than the good old days ever were At least for the moment At least for the big screen side of the industry that hovered on the brink of bankruptcy just a lew years ago. Between 1%‘I and mid-1873 the* major film companies chalked up losses in excess of a half billion dollars I odav those same firms are reporting all-time high financial grosses Warner Bros.’ IDT4 third quarter added up to world sales of $182,273,IMN). American International Pictures announced net income for the first six months of the fiscal year that were the largest ever realized by the firm Universal Studios recorded an all-time peak in production during the month of October, ’74 — with between 17 and 20 TY or theatrical feature units working daily, 113 films rcadv for release*, all 34 sound stages ac tive with productions, and more than H.IMM) employes on the studio payroll Weekly V ariety summed up the phenomenon with the observation "The ninth-month cumulative domestic key city b o of $355,990,(MNI is a new peak in the* history of the computerized V ariety chart And that figure is higher than the total for the e ntire years of 1%K. 1%9. 1970 and 1971 Projections now suggest the* best box office year since the industry’s 1948 all-time peak ’’ The* public is renewing its love affair with movies with a vengeance. The extraordinary thing that has happened in other recessions, depressions, is happening again: as limes grow worse elsewhere, thev grow better in Hollywood As the public seeks escape from the harsh realities of everyday life, from the grim economic forecasts detailed in newspaper and television news reports, it flees to motion picture theaters in recordbreaking numbers. Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Assn of America, himself admits “I frankly don’t know where people (< tint Page 2T V, ( id I ) social security and aid to de-pendent children. “If we are to reduce the rate of growth of federal expenditures. we will have to do it in income transfers, because that's where the money is tieing spent," he said. First Unveiled Weinberger, a former California finance director under Gov. Ronald Reagan and former director of the Office of Management and Budget in the Nixon White House, first unveiled in a television appearance Ort. 6 his estimates of how much HEW' spending could be eliminated. C.R. Youth Dies In Auto Crash A 17-year-old Cedar Rapids youth died Saturday of injuries suffered when two cars collided at a rural intersection a mile north and a mile east of Keystone in Benton county. Benton county authorities said Gregory Fontana, 908 Eighteenth street SW, was fatally injured in the crash, and his brother, Tim, 14, was hospitalized. According to the report, Fontana’s car and one driven by Jerry Claire. 22, also of Cedar Rapids, collided about 8:30 a rn. Saturday. Authorities believe occupants of both cars were hunting. Tim Fontana was in satisfactory condition at Mercy hospital. Claire was charged with failure to yield the right-of-way • * * Gregory Scott Fontana, son of Mr. and Mrs Anthony Fontana, was dead on arrival at Mercy hospital. Born in Cedar Rapids on (Continued Page 3, Col. 2) Today s Index Late Ne* 1 , I, 3. I? City Hull Notes J Deaths. Report Card 8 E tutorial* ..... IO-ll Accent On Youth 19 stoic )N 0 Iowa New* I ll food ............I Television Table frank Ny* * Political Note* I Morton 13 Movie* u n Record Review* 14 f arni 111 1/ Building ll 32 Stoic )N C Social I 24 Around the Town 2 New Book* I T ravel ...... 21 St CT ION D Sport* 11 Outdoor Iowa I F Inane lot 9 ll New York Stock* IO Wont Ad* 12 24 Cro**word 20 Par ode Magazine 1 28 Comic* t I — UPI Telephoto Touring Egypt Wearing Arab garb, Agriculture Secretary Butz took a camel ride during a sightseeing visit to the pyramids at Giza, Egypt, Saturday. Butz arrived earlier for a three-day visit to get a first-hand view of the country's agricultural needs and to sign a 200,000-ton wheat agreement for the second quarter of I 975.