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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 5, 1974 - Page 9

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 5, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Television Today By Jny Sharbull __ Networks Ready For Elections NEW YORK (AP) The CBS, NBC and ABC television networks plunge into their all- night election coverage Tues- day night with computers rea- died, analysts alerted and an- chormen and correspondents politically primed. The networks all say their reports will begin at 7 p.m. EST, broadcast live coast to coast. They say they expect the coverage, which pre- empts all their regular eve- ning programs, to end at around 2 a.m. The Public Broadcasting Service, which serves the na- lion's public TV stations, says it plans no election night cov- erage at all. A total of 504 elections are under TV scrutiny tonight all 435 house seats, 34 senate races and 35 gubernatorial contests. The networks, each trying to be ths first to accurately sort out key winners, major trends and what it all means, will as usual do much of it from their New York studies, but in differing on-air ways. At CBS' studio, Walter Cron- kite is anchoring, Eric Se- vareid analyzing and John Hart trend-reporting. There'll also be four "regional" re- porter-interpreters Roger Mudd Dan Rather Lesley Stahl (West) and Alike Wallace At NBC's studio, John Chan- cellor and David Brinkley are coachers. House elections 'are being observed by the "To- day" show's Barbara Walters and Jim. Hartz. Edwin New- man is deciphering the senate races and White House corre- spondent Tom Brokaw the gu- bernatorial contests. ABC's studio is almost de- serted, comparatively speak- ing. Howard K. Smith and .Harry Reasoncr are coanchor- mg the over-all story, with only Sam Donaldson on hand to elaborate on key house races. The reason the on-air studio crew isn't larger, says Wally Pfistcr, In charge of ABC's coverage, "is that we think Harry and Howard can tell it belter in a kind of conversa- tional way, instead of the old 'and now we switch you to Joe Doaks for the Eastern race' thing." While correspondents for all three networks are scattered around the country for "re- motes" from the headquarters of key candidates, Pfister says Smith and Reasoner also will do long-distance inter- views with some major can- didates at the latters' head- quarters tonight. The networks' trusty com- puters already are crammed with data ranging from past vole patterns case- how all house candidates stand on major issues. And as the returns arrive, the computers will help the networks speedily report not only important "estimated" or "apparent" winners the terms will vary at each network but also the makeup and possible di- rection of the congress in 1975 well before midnight. On the visual side, the fa- miliar large walls of studio "tote boards" are no more. At CBS and ABC, Tuesday's vote displays will be flashed elec- tronically on TV screens, with no wall at all needed. At NBC, they say they're using a gizmo called a "solari consisting of seven small screens two for house races, one each for the senate and gubernatorial races and three for various other data. How much is Tuesday's cov- erage and the months of prc- paration costing? ABC's Pfister says "slightly under million" for his network. His NBC counterpart, Robert Norlhshield, only will say it will cost his network some- where between million and million. Their counterpart- at CBS, Russ Bensley, says: "We re- gard that as confidential for competitive reasons and I don't think I'll tell you." Television Listings Cedar Rapids Csdar Rapidj Walctloo Ollumwa Island Davcnporl La Crosie Rocluilor Iowa Cily Tuesday Night 10- 12- 13- News News News, Woollier, Spls. News, Wcolher, Spls. Action News 6 O'clock Edition News, Snts., Woollier News, Wcother, Spls. Designing Success Eyewitness News Election '74 Election '74 7-Election 74 3-Election '74 "14 Football 74 Moke a Deal of Deep 13-Lei's Make a Deal 74 74 12-Amcrlco 13-Elccllon 74 12- "Moot Me In St. "Julius "Mutiny on the Bounty" 9_ Eyewitness News .7-News, Weother, Sols News, Weather, Spts. O'clock Edition News, Weathers, Spts Eyewitness News Election '74 Election '74 Election '74 Election '74 10-Elccflan Election '74 Wednesday Morning Sunrise Semester New Zoo Revue Sunrise Semester Not (or Women only 2-CBS Hews Today CBS News Todav CBS News Today Today RomDcr Room Lewis Family New Zoo Revuo Caot. Kangaroo Sesame Street Copt. Kangaroo Coot. Kangaroo Morning Stiow Mike Douglas 2- Joker's Wild Namo That Tune Cnrfoons Wild Nome That Tune B- Joker's Wild Nome That Tune Sesame Streot 13- Nome Thot Tune 2-GamblI 7-WlnnIna Streak Farrell Streak 10-Wlnnlno Streak Slreak 9-AII My Children You See It 7-Hlgh Rollers My Children Now You See It <5-Hlgh Rollers Reftnlshlng 10-Hlgh Rollers School Bunch of Lilc Hollywood Squares Bunch Love of Life Squares of Life Squares- Squares and Restless and Restless and Restless Jackpot 9-Spllf Second Sweepstakes Second Sweepstakes Sweepstakes 13-Celebrily Sweepstakes Wednesday Afternoon News 7-Ncws, Weather Weather 3-News Affair Edition Weather School la-News. ond Country Let's Make n Deal the World Turns Make a Deal 4-As tho World Turns tlic World Turni Company 13-Movle In My Life Edoe of Nlahl 3-Glrl In My'Life Night of Night 9-Gcneral Hospital 2-Prlce Is Right World 3-Genera! Hospital f-Prlee Is Right World 2-PrIce Is Riglil World World' 9-Onc Life To Live Game TO Survive a Marrlaoo Life To Live Game To Survive a Morrlooe Gome 10-How To Survive a Marriage To Survive a Marriage Pyramid 2-Tattletales Somerset Pyramid 8-Tattletales :30- GINIgon's Island Dr. Max Room 232 Aftcrschool Special Mike Douglas Jconnle Bewitched Lost In Space Cover (o Cover Floppy 9-Newlvwcd Game 7-Guldlnp Light ol Lives Gome Giildlno Llohl nys of Lives uldlng Light 1 -Dnyi of Lives 12-In school Butterflies :00 Special Griffin Douglas 12-Mlslerogers Griffin Family Missions Gasl Heroes Boone Street Classics 3-Ncwsfcolures bland 9-ARC News ?-CBS 7-NBC News- 3-ABC News Nows. i-NDC News 8-COS News'. 10-NBC News 13-Electric Company' 1.1-NBC Newi Democrats File Campaign Claim Against Grassley WATERLOO (AI'J Black Hawk county Democratic parly chairman David Naglc said Monday lie lias filed a com- plaint of unfair campaign prac- tices against Republican Charles Grassley witli federal Fair Cam- paign Practice Committee. Naglc charged tho Grassley for congress campaign with making false and misleading statements in ils 'campaign ad- vertising about Stephen Rapp in Iowa's Third district congres- sional race, The complaint said Grassley issued a paid radio advertise- ment in which Rapp is said to have voted himself a 45 per- cent pay increase five months after his election to the Iowa legislature tliat Rapp opposed and Grassley favored property tax relief for widows at age 55 and that Rapp opposed develop- ment of Iowa highway 9. Nagle 'said he filed the com- plaint because the ads began running during the last week before the Nov. 5 election anc are "blatant untruths." Police Drive Accused Robber To Bus Station WEST MEMPHIS, Ark. (AP) An accused bank robber was inadvertently freed from the Critlenden county jail and driv- en to the West Memphis bus sta- tion. He hasn't been heard1 from since. The U. S. marshal's office in Little Rock telephoned the sheriff's office here Monday to authorize the release of Billy Iharles Lasker, 31, of Conway. 3e had] served a 10-day sen- :ence for illegally opening a let- ter while employed by the U. S postal service. Lasker was sharing a eel] with Carl Eugene Webster, 27, ol Jacksonville, Fla., who was charged with attempted bank robbery. And when jailers called out for Lasker to leave Webster stepped out. The jailers didn't notice the switch and Webster was driven to the bus depot. Two hours later, Lasker asked ailcrs when he would be re- eased, claiming he was asleep when Webster left the cell. Lasker has been charged with wiping Webster escape. Laborites Beat Off Challenge LONDON Minis- fir Wilson's Labor government las weathered its first chal- enge in the hew parliament, de- 'eating by 14 votes a Conserva- ive motion to block its plans .0 nationalize the shipbuilding and aircraft industries and ac- quire a 51 percent interest in development of North sea oil. The vote was 310-296. Prices in Marketbasket Poll Climb af Slower Rate Hy Associated Press Consumers got a bit of a break at the supermarket dur- ing October, an Associated Press survey shows. 'Grocery prices increased again, but at a slower rale than before. Sales on meat and CL_ helped cut tho bill and there were indications that the price of sugar which has soared percent in the last year may be leveling off. The Associated Press drew up a random list of 15 commonly purchased food and nonfood items, checked the prices on d by Sugar Price Booste Russian Buy NEW YORK (AP) The So- viet Union's purchase of tons of raw sugar has sent world sugar futures soaring ifrom ihe 48.97-cents-a-pound price in the March delivery to a record 50 Vz cents. The Russian purchase Monday from the Philippines came on the first day of a new Itwo-cents- a-day limit ton Ihe increase per pound in the price of sugar. Analysts say the Arab jnalions have been buying lup more sugar than they could use and specu- lating in the futures, because consuming nations have been pinched by short supplies. The analysts say the Russians could similarly be buying to drive the price up and increase their profit. However, other in- dustry observers say the Rus- sians may have sold too much sugar to tlie Soviet satellite na- tions and may have run short. The competition among the consuming nations for sugar has driven the per pound price up 20 cents during the last six weeks. Many traders have been sur- prised by the sharp jump. A German trade house has report- edly Jost million on its short position, partially because the price surge made it difficult for the trader to get 'additional fi- nancing. Newsprint Price Increase NEW YORK (AP) Bowatcr Sales Co. said Tuesday it would increase its price of 30-pound newsprint a ton, to a ton, effective Jan. 1. Other newsprint producers in he U.S. and Canada previously announced increases to a on, also effective Jan. 1. Fulbright Has Minor Surgery WASHINGTON (AP) Sena- tor Fulbright (D-Ark.) under- vcnt minor surgery at nearby Bethesda Naval Medical Center Fatal Ship Fire INNOSHIMA, Japan (AP) 'ire broke out Tuesday aboard a Liberian tanker. One Japanese vorker was killed and four were injured before the blaze was extinguished three hours later. Monday, Jay. his office said Tues- March 1, 1973, at a supermarket in each of IS cities, and ha.c rechecked at the beginning ol succeeding months. Up in Seven The latest check showed that during October, the bill for the marketbasket went up in seven cities, down in four and was unchanged in two. On the average, the bill at the start ol November was 0.7 percenl higher than it was at the begin- ning of October and 13 percenl more.than at the start of the year. During September, AP survey showed the bill was up in 11 cities and down in only Iwo, with an average increase of 2.3 percent. The biggest savings in the lat- est AP survey came at the meat counter. Farmers who say they cannot afford the high cost of feed grain have been selling their livestock, temporarily in- creasing supply and lowering prices. The price of a pound of chopped chuck was down in five of the cities checked, unchanged in four and up in four, with decreases generally averaginj about 10 cents a pound. Less Sleep Sugar prices were up again in nine cities. The price went down in two cities Albuquerque, N. M., and Dallas and was un- changed in two. The increases, however, were less steep than in previous months when the price of five pounds of granulated sugar soared from about 65 cents to about The rising prices and reports of soaring profits for sugar com- panies have spurred demands for government investigations, and the justice department said last week that the sugar dustry was one of several food industries that will be inves- tigated for evidence of possible price fixing. Items temporarily out of slock on one of the survey dales being compared were not included in the over-all totals. The AP did not attempt to area than another. The only comparisons made terms of percentages saying a particular item went up 10 former percent in one city and. 6 per- cent in another, for example. Two Gef 99 Years for 'Stringbean' Murder NASHVILLE, Tenn, (AP) John Brown and Marvin Doug- las Brown have both been sen- tenced to two 99-year prison terms after being convicted of slaying Grand Ole Opry star Bomb Placed On Car Kills Carrier Bov MILWAUKEE newspaper (AP) A carrier bov was killed Tuesday when a bomb placed on a car exploded on his route. Police said the bomb, in 'a plain cardboard box, exploded when it was moved by the vic- tim, Larry Anslett, 15, a car- rier for the Milwaukee Sentinel. Authorities said he apparently became curious when he saw the box atop the late model car at the curb as he made his de- liveries around a.m. The bomb was placed on the car some time during the night, police said. The incident occurred outside the home of R. K. Vermilyea, and the car was owned by Ver- milyea's son, Michael, member of a motorcycle club known as Heaven's Devils. Police said the family had complained 'several times in re- cent months about harassment from members of another mo- torcycle group, the Outlaws. Vermilyea said his son recent- ly testified in court against a member of tho rival club charged With robbery. The fath- er said a window in the home was recently shot out, and there were reports last summer of fire bombings and gunfire at several other area homes. "We heard the explosion and my son went out to look while I called the said Ver- milyea. "He came running back in 'and said there was a body next to the car." The top of the auto was blown away. "I think 1hc bomb was meant for my said Vermilyea. "Just because my son was hon- this is people est enough to testify, what happens. These have got to be stopped.1 Bull, Aide to Nixon, Resigns WASHINGTON (UPI) phen Bull, one of the few per- sons to have access to the White compare actual prices from city House tape containing the Wf- to city to say, for example, minute gap, has quit Richard that cookies cost more in one Nixon's staff and gone into pri- vate industry, it was learned in Tuesday. With Bull's Press departure, Secretary only Ron Zicgler and Nixon's ;ecretary, Rose Mary "Woods, arc left among the prominent holdovers on the staff. Sources indicate Ziegler may leave next an February. Eight Arrested In Korean Fire SEOUL persons David Stringbean" Akcman vere arrested and charged with nnrl liU wifn n._ ___t__j _! Tlic Cedar Itanlds Gazelle: Tutu., November 6, 1974 Public Pays Part Ford Campaign WASHINGTON (AP) and for holel rooms publicans face a large the President and staff for bill for President Ford's trips rest stop during the up-and-lack trip 20 states promoting G.O.P. candidates, but taxpayers will the government pays for ncludes a C-141 cargo plane for a significant part of transports the presidential travel and uses gallons Ford covered miles fuel per hour, and a backup campaign swings that jet plane of 'the presidential Oct. with a trip to that goes along on the VI. The White House is trips to serve the Presi- lating the campaign bill and in case of an emergency. present it to the Republican also pay the ex- tional committee for of the secret service and One of the major expenses men and equip- the G.O.P. lab will be for gallons of jet fuel burned said all these items Air Force One, which necessary to support Ford gallons per hour of his role as President and On the other hand, in-Chief wherever will pay for much of the goes and would be paid for personnel and equipment the government. accompanies the President his secret service protection. The only cost figures compiled so far are for the Vermont trip, White House press secretary Ron Nessen said presidential limousine is provided for the President's pro-ection, Nessen said, and is lown for him in accordance vith the law on security. UUJ said the Republican committee doesn't split These, which will be paid about paying when any the Republican national of a presidential journey mittee, include for a political appearance. Force One; for cars in the presidential ters for the round-trip flight for official guests and from the White House provided under an annual nearby Andrews Air between the secret Humans viLL anci tne rord Motor X "on reasonable Nessen said. He did not spell Pet Food the contract terms. The traveling White House Lead pays for press buses and ts charter aircraft. Television NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) usually provide the Scientists working for the lighting for presidential of Connecticut said Monday and appearances, Nes- people who eat canned pet said. to save money may be exposing themselves to lead Students More than 25 popular brands of canned and dry pet To Protest tested contained lead ranging from safe levels to four Food Waste the danger threshold for children, scientists of the Connecticut agricultural experiment station HAVEN, Conn. (AP) -Two thousand Yale university Jndergraduates were to fast They said tests on to protest waste of U and sandwich spreads also revealed lead, although less frequently and in smaller amounts. Connecticut officials said neither the state's health nor resources in the face o worldwide famine. Rebates from prepaid meals skipped' by nearly half the un dergraduate body will be credit sumer protection departments have received reports of lead poisoning attributed to to a number of organizations nat help feed the world's hungry, according to the Rev William Sloane Coffin, Yale's pet lood. There have been reports an increased number of noted that the fast coin- people have turned to canned pet food for protein., Dr. Lester Hankins, a with a meeting in Rome of from 130 nations o consider ways to aid the biochemist, said- that of persons worldwide livers and other organs are suffer from malnutrition. lieved to have been the fast is intended1 to serve source of the lead in both a model for other institu- foods and snrcads. HR said and to launch a series of negligence in the weekend fire effect of lead on animals eating efforts at Yale that at an office building and hotel the food has not yet been deter- help for the complex that killed 88 persons, mined. "cr midday Candidate in Crash ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) Gary Hart, Democratic i U. S, senate candidate, was a passen- ger in a car involved in a traffic accident on election eve. No one was seriously hurt. Would-Be Ship Defector Reported on Way to U. S. MOSCOW (AP) A Lithu- anian pallor, who tried to defect to an American slu'p four years ago but was returned to a Rus- sian ship captain was reported to have left Tuesday for the U.S. A U.S. embassy spokesman said "no comment" when asked to confirm the report from a friend of Simas Kudirka. The embassy would bo involved be- cause congress made Kudirka an American citizen after it was discovered his mother was jorn in Brooklyn. Kudirka was freed from a Soviet prison last August, lie had been serving a 10-year treason sentence for jumping iboard a U.S. coast giiitrd cut- .er at sea in November, 1970. His pardon reportedly was irdorcd by the supreme soviet, .he Soviet parliament, after pro- .csls and appeals from Ameri- can citizens ami load- ers. It has been known for week: that Kudirka was to pick up an exit visa from Soviet authorities and an, entrance visa from the American embassy at Moscow, but officials on both sides have been silent. Kudirka was a seaman aboard the Soviet vessel Sovietskaya Litva when he made his dra- matic bid for freedom. The ship was lied to the USS Vigilant as officers conferred over fishing rights. Kudirka jumped on the Vigi- lant's deck and told officers he wanted to live in tlio U.S. After consulting with coast guard headquarters in Boston, the offi- cers gave him back to the Rus- sians. Soviet crewmen came aboard and heat Kudirka in front of he U.S. crew, (hen dragged lim back to his ship. After an nvestigation, two senior coast guard officers retired early bc- .'iiusc of the incident. To Order Your Gaiotto Wont Ad DIAL 398-8234 B A.M. lo 5 P.M. Monday thru Friday. 'Til Noon Sol. kivr FOR ANY DRAINAGE FAILURE 365-2243 and his wife. The two men, cousins, were sent lo the stale prison Saturday a little more than an hour after C5 of them in a nightclub, police they were sentenced by Judge said Tuesday. Allen Cornelius. Kim Hu-jin, 42, owner of the Lawyers for the Browns saidibuilding, and1 seven workers they plan to appeal the were arrested. lions. (others were sought. [organs. mined. Hankins said animals proba- iiui'itina sciiu animals bly absorb lead by eating grass on global hunger. or grains on which fumes from auto exhaust settle. up in the It then animals' prices NOW...OBI NEW solid-state 25'giant-screen console Be all set for New Fall TV color shows and sports real savings Choose Now we'll bring out one of these beautiful sets Shop Mon. and Thurs. 'til 9 p.m.... and all day wait   

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