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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, November 5, 1974 - Page 7

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 5, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Changes Made in School Board Meeting Schedule Several changes haw boon made in the Marion Indepcn- dent school hoard incelinn schedule for November, Dr. Clark Stevens, superintendent, said. The regular meeting, sot for the second Thursday, will ho held on Nov. 11 instead because of ii conflict with the Iowa Assn. of School Hoards con- vention in DCS Moines on Nov. 14. The second meeting, sol for the fourth Thursday, falls on Thanksgiving. This meeting has been reset for Nov. 21 at Irving elementary school. Both 'meetings begin at 7 p.m. Stevens invited all interested patrons in the dis- trict to attend either or both meetings. Two Meetings Set By Marion Chamber Marion Chamber of Com- merce has two meetings set for the week. The retail bureau will meet Thursday at a.m. in the Farmers Slate bank community room. The board of directors will meet Friday at a.m. in the Chamber offices, Eleventh street. Hickory smoked barbecued ribs, shrimp and chicken served Wednesdays, Stick- ney's Adv. Marlon Merchants Register now for free turkeys. Nothing to buy. Adv. XI Gamma Sigma chapter of Beta Sigma Phi will meet Tuesday night at in the home of Donna Jayne, 410 Forty-first street NE, Cedar Rapids. The Linn County Council on Aging will present the program. You Count With Kacena! Paid by J. Kacena. Pol. Adv. Ear Piercing Clinic! Satur- day noon to 4. Ray's Jewelry. Open Monday-Thurs- day 'til 9. Adv. Hospitalized Dick Blok. M'J4 Nnrthvicw drive, is a sur- gical patient at Mercy hospital. Visitors are permitted. Don't Forget to Vote! Paid by J. Kacena Pol. Adv. Now stocking micro-wave ovens by Panasonic. Marion TV and Records. Adv. Board To Meet Linn-Mar board of education will meet Thursday at p.m. in the administration building. Vole for Kacena! Paid by J. Pol. Adv. Buchanan Judge Gives Sentences INDEPENDENCE Cindy Johnson, 18, Troy Mills, was sentenced to days in the Buchanan county jail by District Court Judge Peter Van Metre Thursday after she pled guilty to the charge of pointing a gun at another. She had been charged with going armed with intent fol- lowing an incident outside of a Rowley tavern Aug. 3 and had pled not guilty. Her sentence is to begin Nov. 7. A one-year suspended jail sentence was handed down to William Fred Lowe, 2fi, 301 Thirty-first street drive SE, Cedar Kapids, after pleading guilty to larceny in the night- time of property valued under in connection with a (ire theft at the Boubin Tire Co., June 8. He was placed on probation to the Bureau of Correctional Services. Dale Van Gordor, 111. charged Aug. 21 with possession of marijuana, changed his plea from not guilty to guilly. Judge Van Metre deferred sentencing and placed the defendant on probation during good behav- ior Kenneth McCardle for six months. News Suits Charge Violation of Consumer Fraud Act, Code Marion Courts Cases heard Monday In magistrate's court were: Speeding Nels C. Scran- ton, 1895 Douglas court, J35; Creighton D. Campbell, Cen- tral City, Christopher B. Chaffec, 2210 Twenty-seventh street, RickeY E. Pegum, 630 Sixth avenue, Patricia K. Petty, Central City, Anthony G. Murphy, 896 Eighth street, No valid driver's license Ty L. Ozburn, 2740 Fourth avenue, Disobeyed police officers Joseph A. Moses, Ely, Expired license plates Harvey 0. Thompson, jr., 1010 Fourteenth street, Criminal trespass Leslie A. Warner, 375 Third street, Russell L. Tollefson, 112 Second avenue, Hiawatha, Paul A. Kittleny, 3065 Twenty-sixth avenue, YMCA Wednesday's ac- tivity schedule at the Marion YMCA is: Non-aquatic women's fitness class 9 a.m., pre-school gymnastics 11, men's fitness class women's volleyball 1 p.m., gymnastics 4 and 5, adult open basketball 7, bridge lessons 7; pool school lessons 9 a.m. and p.m., pre-school les- sons and 1, adult open swim noon and youth les- sons swim team First United Methodist Church UMW Bazaar is November 6th, from 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Everyone is welcome! Adv. Re-elect Ralph Tuesday Nov. 5. Paid hy Potter for senator committee. M. L. Allen Chairman, Set Meeting Marion water board will meet Thursday at p.m. in the council chambers at the city hall to receive bids for the Linn-Mar water main installation project. The board will move to the civil defense room follow- ing the receipt of bids to con- duct its regular meeting. Your Support is Appreciat- ed! Paid by J. Kacena. Pol. Adv. U. of I. Chosen Host for NEH Teacher Program IOWA CITY The Univers- ity of Iowa is among 12 col- leges and universities desig- nated by the National Endow- ment for the Humanities (NEH) as host institutions for a newly established mil- lion program of fellowships in residence for college teachers. The new program provides for seminars at these institu- tions during the nine-month academic year 1975-76 in 15 different areas of the humani- ties. NEH will grant fellowships to faculty members from two- and four-year colleges to permit them to participate and at the same time to en- gage' in personal study and research. The purpose of the according to Dr. Ronald S. Berman, chairman of NEH, is to make it possible for the fellows to enhance their competence as teachers. Approximately 140 fellow- ships will be awarded, each carrying a maximum stipend of for the nine-month seminar period. An allowance covering travel and moving expenses up to also will be available. Application for fellowships are available only from the endowment, and not from the seminar institutions. Requests should be directed to the divi- sion of fellowships, the Nation- al Endowment for the Human- ities, Washington, D. C. 20506, 382-5827. Applications should be postmarked no later than Nov. 18, 1974. Awards will be an- nounced in mid-March of 11175. ON THIS DATE in American novelist Sinclair Lewis was awarded Ihe Nobel for Literature. DR. RONALD S. HOYLE CHIROPRACTOR 1530 1ST. AVE. N.E. OFFICE HOURS TELEPHONE: BY APPOINTMENT 362-2689 DES MOINES (UPI) -Two Minnesota firms were named in suits filed by Attorney General Richard Turner Mon- day for violating both the Iowa consumer fraud act and. the new Iowa consumer credit code. In the petition. Turner charged Federated Reporting Bureau. Inc.. and Hadley. West. Clark and Patrick. Inc.. both doing business as Federal Reporting Bureau, and Terrance Robsun, vice- president of the second firm, with fraud in selling distribu- torships for the operation of collection agencies. Customer Promises "These distributorships have been sold to lowans for U. of Hospitals Expand Services IOWA CITY The Univer- sity hospital school is expand- ing its role as a training and resource center for the stale of Iowa in the care and educa- tion of handicapped children. The hospital school was es- tablished at the University of Iowa in 1947 by the Iowa leg- islature to provide a facility for the treatment and educa- tion of physically handicapped children and to conduct re- search into the causes, pre- vention and management of handicapped conditions. A major reason for locating this program at the U. of I. was to offer training opportu- nities for prospective workers in this field. Until 1970, the vast majority of the partici- pants in these Iraining pro- grams were U. of I. students. Since then, however, the program has substantially increased both its in-house training activities for profes- sionals from outside the uni- versity and its "outreach" efforts lo communities throughout the stale. "Our programs for non-uni- versily personnel are now increasing greally upon re- commcnls Dr. Riiey Hodges, the school's coordina- tor ofIraining. Attend Workshops Dr. Hodges notes that dur- ing the first six months of 1974 a tolal of 324 professionals from all parls of Iowa and elsewhere allended workshops and olh'er Iraining opportuni- ties at the hospital school, compared with non-U. of I. participants in the preceding six months. "These outside trainees are in addition lo the more than one thousand University of Iowa students who take cours- es and gain clinical experi- ence al Ihis facilily each explains Dr. Raymond R. Remboll, direclor of Ihe Universily hospital school and a member of its original slaff. "Approximately one-half of our university studenls arc registered in the college nf education. We also serve studenls in Ihe fields of physi- cal therapy, occupational therapy, nursing, speech pathology and audiology med- icine and a dozen other discip- lines." Stimulate Training One factor thai has helped stimulate the hospital school's Iraining activities for outside professionals is a new federal regulation which requires lhal 10 percent of all children by the Head Starl nisi be made up of significantly handicapped children. "Most of Ihe people in the Head Start program have never had much contacl wilh handicapped said Dr. Hodges, "and so Ihe Universily hospital school has responded lo meel Ihis new need for Iraining." Dr. Remboll notes that the hospital school also has becn gearing up its outreach programs in response to a law passed in (he last session of Ihe Iowa legislature. Under this new legislation, which goes into effect next year, all children in Iowa, including those with handicaps, must be provided wilh an appropriate educational and training program. New Programs "We are now developing new instructional programs to aid teachers as handicapped children are placed into the mainstream of the state school stales Dr. Hodges, "and we're also preparing lo provide the necessary follow- up services in connection wilh these programs. In August we added to our staff a field spe- cialisl who is coordinating workshops and consulting sevices lo Head Slarl pro- grams Ihroughoul Ihe slate." Dr. Stanley Hew Len, principal of Ihe hospital school, thinks the new special amounts ranging up to wilh promises lo the custoim'r of an average income of !o {HOD weekly and all the help Ihe new distributor needed to get Turner said. In addition, Turner said. "The defendants have falsely told distributors thai their program was legal in the stale of Iowa, when in fad it was not and also that the program had' been approved by the attorney general's office which also is allegedly not true." Lstlcrs Charge I Referring to alleged viola- tions to the consumer credit code. Turner charged thai the two corporations have used dun letters which appear to be from a governmental agency and which appear lo be official documents." The petition asks the I'olk county districl courl lo enjoin the defendanls from selling distributorships "through the use of any deception, fraud, or misrepresentation." The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tues., Nov. 7 the nature of the population of handicapped chilren who are Irealed and educated 'al Ihe hospital school. Al present Ihe hospilal school has approximately 55 physically handicapped children and young people in residence and 10 more are brought in daily. Some of these children and young peo- ple stay at the school for only two to three weeks; while others remain several years, with interspersed periods al home. In addilion, Ihere are about mentally retarded day studenls who are bused in from the Johnson County area. Handicapped "As the stale school system begins to pick up the less scverly handicapped, the pop- ulation we will continue to serve probably will bo the more severely stales Hew Len. In addilion lo developing training programs and sup- port services in connection with the integration of handi- capped children in local school systems, the University hospital school is expanding other outreach efforts to communities across Iowa. Groups serving the handi- capped, such as Home-Parent- Child Stimulation unit in Marshalllown; Skyline Center Inc., in Clinton; Marqucllc School in Davenporl; Ihe In- Home Care Worker Projeel in Iowa City, and oilier similar operations are increasingly calling on the University hospital school, staff for in- service training. "The University hospital school has become much more sensitive to the needs of the outreach and mainstreaming said Ihe principal, "and our response lo these needs is now more timely and more intense. We have reor- ganized our staff and added the necessary expertise to fulfill this commitment." Historical Sites Are filed With State Society DECORAH Winneshiek county's major historical sites have been filed with Ihe Iowa stale hisloric preservalion program al Iowa City, a long- lime objective of Ihe county historical society, said E. J. Weigle, president. James K. Bcranck, of Iowa City, free lance writer and photographer has been supply- ing technical assistance in the project. The new dala that has been galhered will be used for the consideration of deserving sites for the national register of historic sites. Among Ihe nearly 40 sites and objecls under considcra- lion for filing and photograph- ing are Friends church at Hespcr; St. Wenceslaus at Spillville; St. Anthony of Padua, Frankville; Locust Stone school; Frecporl Paper Mill and line kiln; Moneek; Porter House; Sallre Log school sile, Sfwingwater; Twin Springs Keystone bridge; and the Pioneer cemetery. The Norwegian-American museum and the Laura In- galls Wilder House in Burr Oak had reports filed pre- viously. Weigle says an important by-product of Beranek's work was the acquisition of a number ofilems for the ar- chives in depository of the county historical society at Luther college library. Other activities of the his- torical society include owner- ship of Ihe Porter house. Locust school, and Frankville museum, a hisloric markers program on old cemeteries and burial places and coopera- tion with stale and nearby his- torical groups. A colored slide presenlation on Winneshiek county's his- lozy is available for groups wanting to learn more about Ihe history of the county. Vinton to Host Exhange Group VINTON The weekend of Nov. 15-17 will be Operation Friendship weekend in Vinlon. Local families will host a group of about 30 youths from the Newberry Center in Chi- cago. The Newberry Center is a Methodist started and United Fund supported facility serv- ing a predominately black Chicago neighborhood. Opera- tion Friendship is an ongoing project to develop greater appreciation and understand- ing among people. The Chicago youths, mostly 14 and 15-ear olds, will arrive at Washington high school late Friday evening, Nov. 15, to be met by their hosts. Each fammly incorporates their guest into their daily living. For those who wish to par- ticipate on Saturday there are visits scheduled to liirker Farms, Inc. from 1-2 p.m. mid Ihe Dale Hensing farm from 2- 3 p.m. At in a coordinated effort, the Vinton recreation departmenl will sponsor a pol luck gel-logelhcr of hosts, guests, and other interested people. Families wishing to take part in the program may get application forms al an orien- tation session to be held Sun- day, Nov. 3, at Tilford junior high at p.m. The forms should be returned to either Jane Jamison, Harold Shep- herd, Ken Stark, or Jane LaGrange by Nov. 7. ON TIMS in President Franklin Roosevelt was elected to an unprecedent- ed third term. Subaru offers 12 mos. warranty with Bat so much mare Far details call anytime for a recorded message. 363-8563 How's Your r diSToRtEd? COME IN FOR A FREE HEARING TEST HEARING AID SERVICE 337 Higloy Bldg. Call 364-4030 Beware the Cat Pholo by Mildred Oulmbv Safe driving in McGregor these days means watching out for cougars, too. Because of recent reported sightings of the cats in nearby Pike's Peak state park, pranksters have put up signs along the highways entering McGregor to watch out for these animals. Cougars were reported seen last spring in the area, and recently two more sightings occurred, but it has not been confirmed that the animals seen were cougars. LAFF A DAY ARC Schedules Speaker On Establishing Homes and Hardin counties, will speak to the Tama County Assn., for Retarded Children at p.m. Nov. in room 201 of the Soulh Tama County high school. Goal of the residential serv- ices, a non-profit organization, is to establish homes for the mentally handicapped. "He trails me the beginning of every month when the bills TAMA-William Hitchings, Marshalllown, executive director of Central Iowa Resi- dential Services, Inc., for Tama, Marshall, Poweshiek Sell Restaurant CHELSEA-The R and J restauranl. located on high- way 212 on the north edge of town owned by Ronald Zhorne, has been sold to Mr. and Mrs. Berry Prusha of Tama. Want lo keep it or sell it? Idle items lake up space sell them with a classified ad! You can open and close your garage door from your car... It's the Best "garage key" ever made: Electric Garage Door Opener! FREE! 30-Day Trial Don't wait 'til winter! Makes an ideal Gift for anyone... any time! You'll Say "What a big difference it makes. it's more than Buy QUALITY and SERVICE ...Not PRICE ALOHE! Vou save, In the long run. Does your Garage look like this? After we come, if could look like this. Free Estimates, Easy Terms Since Guaranteed Service and Installation Be all set for winter Have us remodel your garage Add a new look and a new safety feature to your old garagel We will patch up, fix up, and renovate your present garage. For your safety and convenience we will install a genuine Overhead Door brand Radio Con- trolled Garage Door Opener! Call us now for a free estimate. We take pride in our quality products and dependable service. Keep out dirt, snow, vandals with the best garage key your Radlol Enjoy easier cold weather starts. a FIBERGLASS Doors let In more light! Choose Steel, Wood or Fiberglass Doorsl All size Doori now in stock! We Service All Makes of Radio Controls Call one of those salesman or our Cedar Rapids Iowa Ctty...Ovor SO 2088thAv9.SE 363-9976 RICH ETSCHEIDT, H.wh.ll 319-223-5436 ,n iowa Call 338-9747 BIU.HUNGERFORD364-6632 Fauc J   

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