Cedar Rapids Gazette, November 1, 1974, Page 9

Cedar Rapids Gazette

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Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - November 1, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Iowa Voters Will Decide Bond Issues Election DayThe Cedar Rapids Gazette: Frl., Nev. I. 1974 (tv Homer I itie Ila n I nited Press International Along with the personalities •rn next Tuesday’s general el eetion ballots, voters in eer tam Iowa communities will in* finding bond issues or annexa turn questions awaiting their votes. Probably the biggest bond issue rn tho state is in lu^s Moines where voters are being asked to decide the fate of a proposed expansion of Veterans Memorial auditorium Capital city convention planners say they need lh* $7 5 million addition in order to attract more conventions in Des Moines. Little opposition has been shown bv lies Moines residents to the addition which would greatly increase the building’s show and display area. A KO percent approval is needed. Annexation In the way of major annexation votes, Algona voters will bi going to the polls to east their ballots on whether or not to tiring a large section of Kossuth county land into the city limits. rho annexation issue, which has bmi the center of an ongoing controversy in the last 18 months, has strong organized opimsIlion. If the incorporation is voted A Day    With Culver (( ontinued from Page 8 I a round to accompany him of busings places. This has been a Culver routine through the years and he considers it one of his good luck tours (Everywhere he goes men recall playing football with or against him when he was at Franklin. At Hartson's tavern, Virgil Fritz challenges hun to a game of ft-ball. Culver accepts and wins the game. At Bul leek s Czech Inn, Bob Higham recalls going to school at Roosevelt high with Culver’s wife, Ann. Someone hands him half an ear of soft corn, saying. “I don't know what we’re going to do with it ” At Konecny’s Good Food, Culver arrives just as a Stanley radio commercia* is being broadcast He listen* carefully. At the Sixteenth avenue Meat Market, he is greeted as a long lost brother by Mr. and Mrs. Lumir Vondracek. He helped them get relatives out of Czechoslovakia when the Russians took over in I9KH “We’ll never forget you for that, Mrs. Vondracek tells him. It s 8 IO p m Culver has had his aides call ahead to his mother, Mrs William Culver, 298 RihI Fox road SE, asking her to fix them steaks. After the steak and taking time to clean up, Culver starts a night of campaigning at 7:45 at Mercy hospital. He keeps gong until 5 a rn., visiting night workers, those who seldom meet the eandt-dates while on their jobs At 5 a.m h*’ is supposed to lake off for Clinton to campaign at plant gates. But his plane is weathered in and the trip is off. So he goes bark to his mothers house, which is his own legal residence, to bcd .down for a few hours. A 24 hour campaign day has ended But another, campaign day is about to begin It s for better than way the life of politi cian the land would double the area of Algona and would add about 450 persons to the city’s population Bremer county residents will tie voting whether or not enough land surrounding Waverly should be annexed to double the northeast Iowa city’s size. Also, Waverly voters will he selecting throe trustees out of eight candidates for tho new municipal hospital lx>ard The cit.v recently purchased St Joseph’s hospital from the ( atholic Sisters of Mercy for a public health facility. Delaware county voters have the biggest health-care issue with county officials asking $2 HK million for the construction of a new county hospital. Officials say the county will actually spend only $hS5.iMMi out of funds on hand. In Winneshiek county, the voters will register their wisher on an $H5ii (NMI issue for the expansion of the county care center by KU beds And, in Howard county, the fate of a $750.(UMI addition to the county home will in* decided Buchanan county voters will Im- casting their ballots on a public measure for the construction of an addition to the county home. The board of supervisors is asking the citizens to authorize the board to spend not more than $185,000 in revenue sharing funds to construct a two-story addition to the county home as specified tic the Iowa department of health Fount* Home Voters in Atlantic are being asked to give their permission to spend $050,000 of revenue sharing funds for a new county home. In southeastern Iowa. voters in Wapello and Mahaska counties are being askisl to form a county conservation commission Jury Finds Fitz Guilty First-Degree Murder FORT DODGE (AP)— Russel! Fit/, 28, Waterloo, was found guilty Thursday of the first-degree murder of 2-year old Shelly Day, also of Waterloo. Webster County District Court Judge Joseph. Keefe read the verdict about six hours after the jury of eight women and four men received the ease Keefe ordered a pre-sent-eneing investigation and did not set a date for sentencing Mr. end Mrs. Willliam Day. parents of the slain girl, said they were satisfied with the verdict and expressed appreciation to Black Hawk County Atty. David Dutton and police involved in the case. The trial was transferred to Fort Dodge on a change of venue from Black Hawk county. The girl s body, an electrical cord around her neck, was found in th<( attic above Fit/’ apartment after a search of several hours on the night of June 8 Objections Are Voiced at Hearing on Street Project Young Fan AP Wirephoto President Gerald Ford greets a young fan at the Sioux City airport Thursday held by Congressman Wiley Mayne (R-lowa). Ford made his second Iowa campaign stop to boost Mayne s campaign and also sought to help Republican senatorial candidate David Stanley. Ruling Clears Way for Renewal IOWA HTY—The way apparently has been cleared for implementing Iowa City's $20-million urban renewal project. U.S. District Court Judge William Stuart Thursday dismissed the last law suit seeking to halt the project. Fails Fire Inspection, Decorah Facility Is Ordered To Close By Doris Ahem DECORAH — An abrubt end has been ordered for the Aase Haugen home. 59-year-old landmark near Decorah that has provided care for elderly citizens since its founding in 1815. Originally built on 240 acres iii land willed lur iht purpose by the late Aase Haugen to the Norwegian-LutSieran I hurch of America the 50-room, brick structure eventually stood on a K20-acre farm For many years the farm supplied most of I he bx si required for the home** patients. beginning with a horse-drawn fanning operation and advancing with inc units to a modern dairy enterprise This week the state department ol health ordered the Vase Haugen Home closed bv Nov. 7 Scatter Occupants This order leaves 25 employes without work and is making it iieu s.sary to scatter the old horn* s I* occupants quickly through other homes over a wide area The closing order came in a letter from the state fir* ► Admin- Nov. 7 abrupt,” marshall s office istralor Glen lairsoi “We thought lf deadline was yen I .arson said We have been ojMTuting under a conditional license that expires next July 14, ann that would have given us more time to find places for our residents in the area lh ,>asd Aase Haugen Homes, Inc., the non-profit conjuration that also operates the Decorah Retirement t enter, was considering building a wing on the Retirement ( enter that could have ae* commodated most of the Aase Haugen residents Two Month Delay Even though local complaints voiced to Des Moines have apparently won a ii* to Ko <la,v delay in the closing. I he process of emptying Aase Haugen of its residents has already* started. I arson “-aid HK of the 48 resident*' collie under Title 19. making them the responsibility ol the Iowa department of sin'Iii I Ten private patients are being processed by tin* De corah Retirement t enter iii cooperation with families and personnel of the* Haugen home, The 28 Title 19 residents are being placed in numerous public institutions throughout Iowa. I arson repented seven of Hie ten private residents have already been relocated in the arca, with four going to the local Eastern Star Home, one lo the Decorah Retirement (’enter, one to Ossian, and one to a relative in Decorah The fire inspection that led to the quick closing came in early October. according to Farson He said the main stumbling block has Imxmi the state requirement of HNI square feet |kt bed “We’ve tried to comply with the other requirements, hut this cost would he too much. Farson said “When the home had over KU residents, we had two persons in rooms that are now considered tis* small for one ’’ Notice has been given to the home s 24 employ«*s, according to Larson, but some of them will Im* absorbed into the Decorah Retirement ( enter. The borne was opened in the present building in 1915 as a home for old people built by the Evangelical Futhern church. It became a non-profit corporation in IHKU. The Haugen administrator noted that had the conditional license period been allowed to stand, lie had hoped to find places in the Retirement Center for Haugen residents as vacancies occurred and other places in the* area for the remainder if the Retirement Center addition had not materialized. Stuart ruliKl that the environmental inpart statement (EIS) for the urban renewal project is adequate. Two local groups, the Iowa Student Public interest Research Group (ISPIRG) and the Citizens for Environmental Action (CEA), filed the suit, contending the EIS inadequately explored alternative forms of mass transportation. Prevent Execution The groups had asked the court to issue temporary and permanent injunctions to prevent execution of the urban renewal contract between Iowa C Tty and Old Capitol Associates. the developer. The Environmental Protection Act requires that an IFS he filial for all construction projects using federal funds and that the statement consider the impact of the proposed project and alternatives to it. ISPIRG and CEA spokesman John Faitner said an ap-IK*al of the ruling is “still under consideration A decision will tx* made on this within a week or so “ Federal court procedures allow KO days for such an appeal    0 Performed Function In his ruling. Stuart said, “the FUS does provide a basis for consideration of environmental factors associated with the urban renewal project . It gives the decision makers a wealth of information on which to base their decisions The court is of the opinion, therefore, that the KIS has performed its function.” F'rcvia Hieronymus, spokesman for Old Capitol, said first consideration would be given to filing a bid for 62 units of federally subsidized low income elderly housing. “If Old Capitol is the winning bidder on this particular property, HNI units will be constructed. “Also, construction of the mall will be our first major construction step,” she said The two-block enclosed shopping mall which is the heart of the Old Capitol plan. would bt1 topped by a two-story parking ramp., INDEPENDENCE - Approximately HNI persons attended a public hearing here this week on a 50-block street paving program proposed by the city council for 1975. Many persons in attendance objected to portions of the program and several petitions opposing it were presented at the hearing. However, two letters from residents supporting the project were read. After studying the petitions and considering oral objections, the council is expected to complete plans for the street program at the Nov. 12 meeting. Madison said he thought the 50-block plan would be reduced to 15 or 20 blocks. At the request of the Retail Bureau of the Independence Area Chamber of Commerce, the council voted to allow free parking on the downtown streets of the city during the holiday period from Nov 29 through Jan. 2. Federal Md Councilmen agreed to apply for federal aid through the federal aid urban system for the paving of feeder streets, including Twelfth street NE from highway 150 east to F’ighth avenue NF] and on FJghth avenue NE, north to the city limits. If approved, $72,220 could lie realized in federal money for paving of the streets. The paving improvement would lie advantageous to the city’s new industrial park in the northeast section of the city. The council placed a ten-ton truck embargo on F’ighth avenue NF] from F'irst street east to the Illinois-Central railroad tracks. The truck load limitation was approved so that traffic would he pushed across and down to highway 150 Seek Bids After hearing a condition report on the water tower at the mental health institute, the council agreed to advertise for bids for a five-year maintenance contract for the tower The Clear Ixike firm reported the tower, recently acquired from the institute, lo be in good condition hut in need of maintenance. A public hearing was set for Nov. 12 at K p m. at the city hall on a proposal to lease a parking space HI feet-by-70 feet to Robert Fuller for one year at a cost of UKK. The parking space is at the rear of Fuller’* repair shop in the city’s public parking lot. Brooklyn to Honor Long-Time Doctor BROOKLYN—Dr FC Hickcrson and his wife will be honored Sunday in Brooklyn for their service to the community. The event honoring the long-time physician will he held in the cafetorium of the BOM high school beginning at 1:30 with a brief pogrom. The open house will conclude at 4. Sponsors of the day are the Brooklyn Kiwanis club and .Jaycees, and other interested individuals. "PSUkal Adwer Iii VIT ST!1 Pettit OI Advt t ti'jflfnyiif We Still Have A Goad Selection of Dried Foliage, Flowers & Cones Inducting • Eucalyptus • Lotus Pod* • Star Flower* • German Statice • Magnolia leave* Wheat • Cotta*!* • Strowflower* • Oak Leaven, • Baby Dieatb New Shipment of beautiful Hager Hanging Pot* in decorator calor*. Cloy Pot* and Soucar* Straw Wreath*, Wire Wreath Rings SHOP SPECIAL Mixed Fall Bouquet in Boid Compote $J95 I Ou. Colorful Carnations • I «t Cath St Carry I WF SINO HOWf ftS eVtltYWHLKf SOOS CENTER PT. RD. NE 393-5565 Slate Representative loan Lip sky IWofrniK'd For iii Providing St rv to IVoplr Joan Lipsky works for Cedar Rapids To organize more efficient government to build better schools to provide property tax relief to develop better health service to improve welfare services to up-grade police protection to construct improved highways .c* * VOTE JAMES M. HENNESSEY RE ELECT REPRESENTATIVE JOAN LIPSKY A    STROM TOICH FOR    RADIOS IS TUE IOU’.4 LEGISLATURE UiMtrict 2b Haul bur by (ll mm* tor .loan Uptdty — k Fit ward Fry — Atm Swanky, t o-Chairman fit PUBLICAN Jim Hennessey your County Treasurer, places service and savings for you, first and foremost! SERVICE: program By initiating a license plate renewal through your banks and credit unions. By providing a clip out license plate application, published in a local newspaper. CAUIIIftCi ^ making Linn County the number I county for vHTInllVi interest income in the State of Iowa earning over $1,000,000 to date. $1,000,000 you did not have to pay in taxes. Jim works for you. VOTE NOV. 5 Raid for by Hennessey Election Committee, M. Stevenson, Chairperson ;

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