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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 30, 1974 - Page 5

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 30, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Cedar Itaplds Wed.. (M 29th District: Casebook Of Party Politics By Tom KiurlilltiK 'I'lii1 stall- legislative rare in tlic twenty-ninth district offers a casebook example of parly politics ill ils besl. Holh Ihe Democratic in ciiinhi'iil, .liii' Kinas, anil his Republican rival, .lay Raima, arc inlolligcnl. artii'iilali1, young and ilynainic. They seem eminently iiualifii'il tu si'i-vc well the cnnslilncnls anil the stale. But Kinas and Kacena have diami'trirally different politi- cal philosophies, split righl down party lines. Like many others running fur office, the Iwii rail fur lax reform: Ilinas favors redis- tributing the wealth, taxing the rich more than the poor; Kacena, on the other hand, would allow the wealthy and business tax incentives, to "stimulate productivity." A Difference The Democrat believes in increased gnvernmenl partici- pation in retirement pro- grams, while the Republican hopeful wants greater reliance on private retirement plans. Rinas. a machine operator with Cedar Rapids Kngineer- ing Co.. sides with labor. Kacena. employed by Kquita- ble Life Insurance Co., is management-oriented. And the incumbent believes in of penal laws: Joe Rinas Jay Kacena 29th house district candidates in Election '74 his opponent Iliinks (he laws .should be lightened. Moved lo Marlon Rinas, 27. of Knglish boulevard. Marion, was born in North Dakota but has lived in Marion since the age of 5. except for stinls in the air force and in college. Two years ago. while a .ju- nior al the University of Iowa. Rinas won election to the house with a narrow victory over Republican Arthur Hans- child. A political science and east Asian studies major in school. Rinas discontinued his educa- tion due lo legislative and marital responsibilities. Mar- ried in March of IDTIi. he and his wife .Jennifer arc the par- School Board Notes The Cedar Rapids Commu- nity school board Monday night gave first reading to seven district policies, and delayed the reading of another one. Policies approved were a change in the organizational chart, job descriptions for the executive director of staff and learning resources develop- ment, coordinator of leaching resources, coordinator of op- tional programs, budget pub- lication, public review of the budget and student transpor- tation. The board delayed accept- ance of a policy on release of school information until minor clarifications are made in ils wording. Meeting Changed In other business, the board changed Ihe date of ils first November board meeting to Nov. 12. The board was scheduled lo meet on Nov. II. Veteran's day in Iowa. Closed Session At the request of President Ronald Moore, the board vot- ed unanimously to meet in closed session al 5 p.m. Nov. 4 to discuss personnel and ne- gotiations strategy. Change Orders Also approved was a change order in the contract of K and S Klcctrical Contractors for renovation work at Roosevelt junior high school. The change order is for wir- ing needed for dishwashers in the kitchen area. Land Deals The board also voted lo begin condemnation proceed- ings on a portion of property ill 2515 J street SW, owned by U'ona M. Samek, and on prop- erty al J street SW. owned by Leo i'' Samek. The board authorized a quit claim deed for Lincoln school to be sent to Kirkwood Community college Finances The board approved pay- ment of in gener- al fund bills, and S7l18.79fi.M2 in schoolhouse fund bills. Personnel The board granted leaves of absence to three certified staff members, Julianne Anderson. Kami Nordslrom, and Dolores Svoboda. The board granted classi- fied appointments to Wanda Feyerabend and Judith P. Rose. The board terminated John Farrell and Dorothy Lee. both classified employes, for per- sonal reasons. Bidding Set The hoard approved plans, specifications and form of contract for housewrecking al McKinlcy and Wilson junior high school site areas. Hills will be received 15, and contracts awarded on Transportation The board approved an agreement with the Linn county heallh center for use of school buses lo transport sen- ior citixens from Americana Nursing home lo Ihe heallh cenler workshop at SI. Luke's hospilal. The district will Thief Missed Inside Trunk SKAS1DF. HF.ICHTS. N..I. (AP) Somewhere (here's an aulo Ihief who may want lo kick himself. For two months, he didn't look in the Irnnk of the car he stole, where lie would have found in negotiable securities and jewelry. Police here found the car abandoned on Sept. and when they gol around to looking in the trunk, Ihey finally located the owner. They said Ihe owner. David Sheldon. 75. of New York City, and his wife had been packing their car for a trip to Florida on July 111. "They placed the valuables in the trunk of the car and re- turned to their apartment for other ilems, and when they re- turned lo the slreet Ihe car was gone." said Sgl. (lerald LaS- tella. He said the Iliefl of the car was reported, but not the loss of the slocks, bonds and jewels. ON THIS DATK in IH7I1. the House J udiciary ('mum it ice began lo consider possible mi pcachmenl proceed) ngs against President WATER CONDITIONER cuts of a son, Joshua, born days ago. McGovorn Campaigner Rinas' interest in politics was piqued, he says, when he worked in the McGovorn cam- paign and on the national platform committee. On moving back lo Marion he decided lo get his feel wet. At the stale level. Ilinas sees lax reform as the "overriding" issue. He notes lhat individuals making up lo a year pay oul 12.5 percent of Iheir income in state and local taxes. Those incomes above are assessed but X.4 percent, ac- cording lo Rinas. What's needed, the candi- date contends, is a more progressive lax system. weighlod along income lines, and "less reliance on properly tax" as a source of local gov- ernment income And Rinas opposes lax in cciilivcs for Ing' business, arguing that firms will settle in Iowa withoiil such benefits. "Iowa provides the two lllosl important things a company considers before locating: An adequate work force and good transportation." Kacena charges the lax reform Rinas anil other Democrats propose is a "crock." "The Republicans are Irv- ing to reduce taxes, as (iov Ray has done, what the Democrats wanl lo do is re- duce tile tax for some and gel Ihe big guys who have helped make Iowa whal it is a rich and decent place lo live. "Took Hay" "We have been talking in Iowa from day one on the need to reduce properly taxes, lint it look the Ray administration and a Republican legislature lo get a bill lo phase oul Ihe tax. eliminate properly tax on livestock and update inherit- ance tax laws These, said Kacena. arc "meaningful reforms, and Rinas voted against all of them." The Republican candidate. !J5. was born and raised in Cedar Rapids and was gradu- Iowa Relationship Talks Set A series of speeches and discussions reviewing rela- tions between native Amer- ican Indians and whiles in Iowa is scheduled for six dates between Nov. Ill and 24. al the Central YMCA. Free babysiling will be Native Son Project Still Has Openings The number of participants in the Cedar Rapids "Opera- tion Native Son" has reached 18 with some additions still expected. Harold Kwoldt. co- ordinator lor Ihc project, announced Wednesday. He emphasized that other firms interested in I he projecl can still make reservations by contacting him at the Cedar Rapids-Marion Area Chamber of Commerce. The project, which this year observes its 101 h anniversary, is sponsored by the Chamber's personnel managers committee. Lalest firms to enroll are the Norand Corp.. Collins Radio group of Rockwell In- ternational and !he Kmploymenl Security com- mission. Those three, together with lf> named earlier, bring I lie total to the same figure as a year ago. The "Operation Native Son" will be held Dec. '17 when college students will be home for the holiday recess. College seniors tliroughoul Eastern Iowa will be guests of the personnel managers com- itteee and the participating firms. Top officials from each par- ticipating company will man booths and will be available lo discuss will] Ihc seniors var- ious career opportunities available in the Cedar Kapids area. provided al the YMCA arid free parking will be available courlcsy of Iowa Naliomal Insurance. The sessions arc funded and sponsored by the Iowa board of public programing in the humanities, an agency of the national endowment and Cornell college. The sessions offered arc: Sunday. Nov. HI II lo li p.m. Native American forms of cultural expression. Panel of Indian artists. Sioux City drum and bugle group, local dancers and small discussion groups. Tuesday. Nov. 12 to p.m. History of native Americans and the I'.S. Indi- an policy Dr Richard Thom- as, Cornell college, and dis- ncssion groups. Sunday. Nov. 17 to p.m. Comparative look at na- tive American anil whitc- anglo-American culture. Helen Pcterscn. American Indian developmenl cenler. Tuesday. Nov. Ill lo p.m. Overview of the con- lemporary situation of native or reserva- tion, .loan Kachina llarle. Menominee Indian. Chicago. Discussion groups. Saturday. Nov. '1 to 5 p.m. The native American in this community, and panel including Mildred Mover. F.ngenc Have. Winmebago In- dians; Pele Stanislaw. Flal- head Indian; Ray Slick. Indian, Thomas White, Cedar Rapids public school, and Ralph Cody. Cedar Rapids human rights commis- sion. Sunday. Nov. 21 3 lo li p.m. Solutions lo the problems of loday and the needs of (he future. Ruben Snake. Win- nebago Indian: John Sailer. Abnaki Indian: lion Liberlus. Chippewa Indian. t'rban American Indian center. Min- neapolis, and Jerry Visncr, In- dian economic development. "ALL EXCLUSIVE DIAMOND GLOSS COLORS WITH GENERAL ELECTRIC SILICONES" BODY FENDER REPAIR Kllh every Earl Scheib paint job: IF METAL WORK ON VOUR CAR AMOUNTS TO Slq.OO OR LESS YOU PAY ABSOLUTELY NOTHING STILL AMERICA'S BIGGEST BARGAIN CEDAR RAPIDS 1000 2ND AVE. S.E. 366-7544 DAVENPORT BIO WEST RIVED DR. .124-06.11 OES MOINI5 1110 LOCUST ST MB-6536 ateil from Marion high school. lie lives al 2745 First avenue. Marion, with his wife Kalhy and three daughters Navy Veteran A navy veteran, he has worked at Kquilablc since and is presently a field un- derwriter and agency trainer Kacena has not run for elec- tive office before bill has been involved in grassroots polilics for "15 or 20 years" and has worked in others' campaigns. He gol into the statohoiise race, he says, because "I be- lieve in fiscal responsibility, and we jusl have to gel rid ol the big spenders." The Hcpiihlican-dominalcd Iowa legislalnre and Ihe Ray administration. Kacena feels, typify the 001" philosophy al its best. "Our unemployment rate is half the national average: we have a balanced budget a surplus, in fact, which is unique. We're conlrolling the cost of government. Just compare thai to Ihe Democrat- ic-controlled federal govern- ment." Kacena says "we've got to stop 12 percent inflation. Al [hat rate, we're talking about a person who now needs a month to retire on needing SM.IMII) a month in 115 years. We've got lo do something about it." 29th District The representative district Includes Cedar Itaplds lireeinels 111 through 33 (Kl- senlmwer school, Harding and all the elly of Marlon; and Marlon township. Squaw Creek preelnet (Starry school. Deficit spending by the government, he claims, is the "prune cause of inflation Code Revision Both candidates feel there should be revisions in the state's criminal code but dis- agree on the nature of changes. Rinas the need for rehabilitation of criminals. "Work release programs and halfway houses where the felon's psychological readjust- ment is monitored bring about a reduction in crime They're doing the job. It's the type of approach I believe in." lie also thinks the court system needs to be mollified to reduce the backlog of cases. Trials for serious crimes, he feels, should be speedily scheduled. Kacena recently served on the Linn county grand jury and commented he was "frightened to death by the Hie degree of crime Unit's going on." "Same People" "And." he found, "lor the most part it is committed by the same people Seventy-one percent of the crimes in the community are commilled by habitual offenders The laws, he thinks, are "too lax in allowing people to return to the streets. "We have to gel away from the early release of hardened criminals And we need to set up realistic sentences in line with the nature of the crimes." Kacena believes in improv- ing rehabilitation particu- larly for the young but says (here are "too many with no chance to rehabilitate. And it is a disservice to the public to have them back on the streets." liotli Confident As the campaign nears its end. both candidates them- selves arc on the streets. Kacena has been active all along on the hustings and pre- dicts. "I definitely expect In win this thing." Rinas. who has taken a two- week leave of absence from his job. counters by staling. "Fin gonna get him." One. of course, will lose. But the voters at least have a clear choice between two competent men. Compared WW I Experience Hitler Eden LONDON (AT) British Foreign Secretary Anthony Kden and Adolf Hitler were comparing their experiences in World war I during a dinner parly in Berlin in 1SI35. Kden. who is now Lord Avon, recalled in a television iew Friday. They found they had fonghl in Hie same sector about the same lime. Avon said afterward Fran- cois Poncel. the French am- bassador at Ihc time, asked him. "Is it true that you were opposite Hitler on the "Well, it seems so. doesn't it'.'" Kden replied. "And you missed him! You ought In be said Poncel. Blood Pressure Tests Set in C.R. Persons in Cellar Rapids will have a chance lo have their blood pressure measured free Friday through next Thursday at Killian's depart- ment store in Lindale Hours will be from to p.m. weekdays, from HI: a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from lo 5 p.m. Sun- day. The screening is part of a hypertension study sponsored by the Fnviersily hospitals and the Iowa City Veterans hospital. Coe Students Seeking Sponsors for Walk-a-Ihon Some 4110 lo Cue college students will participate in a Walk-a-Thon Sunday to raise money for a multiple sclerosis victim and former student. Harry Cummings. All the Coe social sororities and fraternities (Phi Kappa Tan. Tan Kappa Kpsilon. Sigma Nu. Lambda Chi Alpha. Alpha Sigma Phi. Delta Delia Delta. Chi Omega, and Alpha Pi plus Ihe Coe Insurance Agents' Seminar Slated Cedar Valley chapter of CPCL' is sponsoring a seminar for all iowa insurance agents Nov 1 at Ihe Longbranch restaurant in Cedar Rapids. The program is for Ihc agcnl. as well as insurance company personnel. and presented by company mar- keting leaders and agency leaders. Subjects lo be discussed are: Education. A Direct Writ- er's Marketing Mix. Risk Managemenl. Iowa Law Af- fecting Ihe Agent. ANo realurnrl wilt be a pan- el discussion on the fulure of insurance by Iwo agency presidents and two company presidents. For more informa- tion contact Harry llagcn. P.O box Cedar Rapids. cross country learn and a number of oilier students are expected to participate in Hie 211-mile hike, which will start and finish on Ihe Coe campus. Cummings was a member of the football team. Phi Kappa Tan fraternity and Lellermen's club while a student at Coe. He was first with MS lasl April, jusl a month before his scheduled graduation, and is now hospitalized in LaCrossc, Wis. The monies raised from Ihe Walk-ii-Thnn will go directly to Harry and his family to defray hospilalination costs. Other fund-raising projects over Ihe Homecoming weekend at Cue went lo Ihc MS The sludents are seeking sponsors for their walk. Any individual or who would he willing lo pay on a per-mile basis is urged to tele- phone Bill Judge. Mike Judge or Tom (Irosshans at the col- lege, :Hi4-l51l, ext. or 448, or the Coe news bureau, exl. 283. To Report Drug Violation Telephone Michael Dooley 377-8081 Save 75C on every pair of Hanes TUMMY CONTROL Pantyhose Mi v, lummv 'I h-is ni. .tri'U'hv ,ir AMMVHH ,n i." 11. ;hMi UV.IIIM' II. VI llltl.l Slll'l" V  o u 01 a. a K   

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