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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, October 29, 1974 - Page 7

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 29, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Itaplds Tues., Oct. 29. 1971 Marion Schools First Quarter Ends Thursday Kirst tif si'liiinl ciicls Thursday in lintli Hit1 Mar and Marion Independent districts. An in-service day is sched- uled fur Hit1 Marion Indcpcnd I'lit fai'iilly on Friday, wilh nn classes scheduled. will have parenl ennferences at all grade lev- els, .hniinr and seniiir high conferences will he held I rum noun In fi p.m. Parents of seventh through 12th grade sliidenls may crime any linn1 during tilt? five-hour period or call and reserve a time. No c'lasses are scheduled. A Activities Planned for Education Week The Linn-Mar Kiliicatinn Assn. has planned inuiienius activities for (his week's American ICducalion week. Displays of student work may he seen at the Iowa F.lectric Light and Power Co. office in Marion ami Yimnkcrs at Lindalc Plaxa. Work in- cludes such items as insect collections, globes, candles and dresses. AKW posters are being displayed in various Marion area store windows. Tape recordings and student pos- ters of "what school means In me" are being shown on an area television station. Give Awards Cub Scout pack 185 met Monday at the Linn County KEC building and presented awards lo Harold Odueii, Curtis Hall, Scott Koid, Karl Kaue, .leff Chris- tenson, Bryan Hansel, Mike McCalley, David John Van Gnrp, David Hoff and Scott Sutlnu. Marion Rainbow advisory board will meet Wednesday al p.m. at the John Slushcr residence, 158 Chatham road NK, Cedar Hapids. Hickory smoked barbecued ribs, shrimp and chicken served Wednesday's, Stick- ney's Scl Kvcnt A candidates night will be held Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the Fanners Slale bank commnnily room. The sponsors are the Cedar Rap- ids-Marion Area League of Women Voters and the Marion .laycee chapter. Ear Piercing Clinic! Sat. noon lo 4. Ray's Jewelry. Open Mon.-Thurs. till YMCA Wednesday's ae livity schedule at (he Marion YMCA is: Non-aqualicj women's fitness class !l a.m.. pre-school gymnastics 11. men's fitness class women's volleyball 1 p m., gymnastics 4 and 5. adult open basketball 7. bridge les- sons 7: pool school lessons il a.m. and p.m., pre-school lessons and 1. adult open swim noon, youth lessons swim team adult swim 7' Honor Teachers The1 leaching staffs of the Marion Independent and Linn-Mar school districts were honored Sunday at an open house held in Ihe American Legion build- ing. The American Legion auxiliary sponsored the event. Credits Tea Leaves For Record Lemon SYDNEY, Australia (I'PI) John Tighe says he has grown a lemon with a 15-inch circumference and attributes Ihe to tea leaves. Tighe says he believes it's the biggest lemon ever grown. "1 had (rouble .gelling Ihe tree started when I planted il seven years agn, so I sprinkled lea leaves around its roots several times a he said. Marlon Courts Cases heard Monday in magistrate's court were: SneedliiK Mark A. Ramsey. Springville. Honda 1. Weisser, 2435 Twenty-sixlh avenue, .Ian- ice M. llarbil. Mansfield avenue Cedar Hapids, Karl I1'. Hennessey, 2345 Tenth avenue. Terry Man- gold, M74 Tenth street, Ken K. Malher. :t'2lll South- land street SW, Cedar Hapids, Steven (ialto, 3H32 Sonlter avenue SK. Cedar Rapids, failure lo stop in assured clear distance ahead Karl Ilolub, 777 Fourth avenue, 825. Failure to yield right-of- way Agnes 11. Okken, Todd- ville, Intoxication on a publie highway Creighton Campbell, 214 Sixth street SW. Cedar Rapids, Set Meeting Retail bu- reau of the Marion Chamber of Commerce will meet Thurs- day al a.m. in the Farm- ers Slale bank community room. Asks Return of Discarded BARNSLKY. England (UPI) A man who threw away into the path of bewil- dered motorists while standing in the back of a speeding truck asked police can have the' money back. Police said the man, aged 50, (old them he drew the money from his savings give to the woman he had loved for 20 years, but she refused it. Heartbroken, lie thumbed a ride on a truck and during the trip threw the money away in a fit of pique. "So far. more than has been handed in by cilixens." a police spokesman said. "He is very lucky Iherc are so many honest people aboul." Trooper Bawls To Catch Cows JONESVILLE. Mich. (AP) Slate Policeman Keith Miller used his pat nil car. a public address system and his farmboy knowledge to recap- ture nearly 80 cows. The cattle escaped endan- gering passing motorists. But to Trooper Miller Ihe task of recapturing the animals was simple. lie drove his car into a field, turned on his loudspeaker and began bawling like a calf. Sure enough, the cows trudged into the field and clustered around Miller. "I learned a lung lime agn that you can't outrun said Miller, who grew up on a farm. "You've gol to outsmart them. Yon try to herd them with a car or sirens and they're going to scatter belter skelter." Ambushed Vet to Officer School CAMP Pendleton. Calif. (AP) The sole survivor of a marine patrol ambushed by the North Vietnamese is going to officer candidate school. The marine corps said Sgt. Jose released from a North Vietnamese prison camp in March. has elected lo slay in uniform after medical rehabilitation al Camp Pendle- ton. 24. was given an intelligence assignment and was attached to the First marine division's interrogalor- translalor team at Camp Pemllelon when the officer training orders came. He lives in Kelugia, Texas. The officer .school is at tjuan- lico. Va. Luther Students Injured When Car Plunges Off Road DKCORAIl Two Luther college students were hospi- Monday afternoon wilh injuries suffered in a one-car accident in Palisades park here. According lo Decorah po- lice, David A. Johnson, Austin, Minn., driver of the car, was taken to a Decorah hospital for treatment of rib injuries, lacerations of the head and back, and possible internal injuries. Daniel Johnson, a passen- ger, was taken to the hospital with head and neck injuries. Two oilier passengers in Ihe car, Kent Mori and David Ol- son, were uninjured. Police report the accident occurred at p.m. Monday north of the park drive en- trance when Johnson lost control of his car on a hairpin curve. The Johnson car went off the right side of the road, plunged down embankment, struck a tree, and rolled over on ils top 47 feet below Ihe road. Johnson was charged wilh failure lo have control of his vehicle. Winneshiek Board Authorizes Sign DECORAH Because of an increase in traffic on route 1240 in Madison township, the Winneshiek county board of supervisors adopted a res- olution Monday Ihe installation of a stop sign at the intersection of 1240 and 1242. The board sold a lot in Spillville to Mrs. Al Klimesh for 825. Ik-r bid was the only one received after the 33 by 204 foot lot ajnining her prop- erty was advertised. Auctioneer Lyle lleadinglon, mule one, Mable. Minn., was granted a renewal of his auc- tioneers license. Burning Money Burns British Tax Dodger LEEDS. England (AP) Keith Sharp burned worth of British currency in an attempt to dodge the lax man. Now his caper is going lo cost him more. Prosecutor Gerald Coles told the Leeds Crown court Mon- day: Sharp, who is 30, was given in cash by his father before ho died. Sharp kept the money in his safe and did not declare it to the lax authorities. When he heard the revenue men had got wind of his hoard, lie put the money into Hi envelopes, burned them and buried the ashes under a rose bush. Tax inspectors, who had been keeping a close watch on the family's financial affairs, visited Sharp and questioned him. An invcsligalnr dug up Ihe garden and found the ashes. Police lab experts iden- tified the hairlike metal strips thai British paper money con- tains. Sharp was ordered lo pay a fine of pounds costs of pounds (SI and a tax of pounds on the ashes. MARMADUKE By Anderson A looming -jRe-eBect- JAMES m. i COUNTY PAID (OR liy Ihn Mcnnimny lloclmn Comm Mim Slcvi-nmn, Chnirpcrion. Fate Smiles on Quiltmaker "I'm afraid that technically he is on a leash." Scientists Discover Pollen Grains Are Index of Life IOWA CITY To some people pollen means little more than a runny nose and headache. Hut for scientists these minute grains have become an index to the book of life. What's more, pollen can hes used to document climatic change, search for oil or even to track down criminals. Pollen, Ihe male reproductive cell of plants, is enclosed by a hard ouler covering, and il is (his original covering thai can be preserved for millions of years in acid, oxygen-defi- cient environments such as hogs or swamps. University of Iowa Geologist Richard Baker says re- searchers have found pollen samples over million years old. In many cases it is possible lo identify Ihe exact type of plant that produced the pollen, while in other instances the general group of plants can be determined. This is more than enough information, however, to allow scientists lo chart Hie kind of plants lhal have grown during the pu.Vi. Because plants change wilh climate, Baker says lhal preserved pollen coverings also have provided us with our most complele and accurate record of the earth's climatic history. Such information recently led lo Hie conclusions Ihe world's climate goes through cycles and thai only about five percent of the time has the earth been as warm as it is today. Ther also are indications we have just passed the peak of a warm period and are headed into another long cold phase in the earth's weather cycle. Pollen can also be used to identify concentrations of cer- tain types of prehistoric plants lhal are commonly associated wilh the location of fossil fuel deposits such as coal and oil. Baker recounts that pollen even helped to solve a murder mystery near Vienna, Austria. Mud taken from the shoes of a suspect contained a combination of pollen found only al one nearby location and il was (here lhal Ihe murder victim's body was discovered. The study of pollen began less than eight years ago and there is slill much to be learned. Baker feels that willi the help of the electron microscope scientists one day will he able lo make a more complete idenlifjcalion of pollen grains. Stone Defends Nixon Donations MEMPHIS (AP) Chicago millionaire W. Clement Stone, 72, says he believes Ihe million he gave lo two of Richard Nixon's presidential campaigns was money well spent. "I Ihink my goal was achieved to change Ihe course of history for the bet- ter." the insurance man ami philanthropist said at a con- vention of hotel executives. Expressing the view that history will look kindly no Nixon, particularly for his record ill foreign affairs. Stone said: "lie had the guts lo have de- tente with Russia and China, lie gol us out of Vietnam wilh honor, lie kepi the Com- munists from taking over Israel." Independence Women Injured in Crash WINTllROl'-Two Inde- pendence women were hos- Monday wilh injuries suffered when the car in ubicll they were riding was struck by another vehicle on a county road northwest of Winthrop. Marvel Van Cleave. Ill, suffered contusions and Ida Mae Evens. 83. abdominal injuries. The driver of the other car. Earl Albert (Iraesch, S5. Au- rora, and his wife, Ruth, who was a passenger, were treated and released. ON THIS DATE in the New York slock market collapsed, selling off Hie worst financial catastrophe in I'.S. historv. When Tom Riley was first elected to the Iowa Legisla- ture, compensation benefits for workers who were laid off or injured on the job were a week. As a result of legisla- tion he has sponsored and worked for, those benefits havo more than tripled and will continue to increase automatically to 200% of average slate income by 1981. Tom Riley got things done for working men and women in the Iowa Legislature. HE WILL GET THINGS DONE IN CONGRESS McdUKdOH- Sonic .....nllis iiKd the ScheivcKcnt prime sponsors of a local drive to huild a swimming [inol for 'he area, benmi fishiiu; around for different ways to raise funds for the pool. One idea members came up with was to have members make a which would be Kivcn away in a raffle. Theee women actually produced the Mrs. John OirlcU. Mrs. I.illis Sawvcll. and Mrs. Verla l.awsou. They agreed the project look them untold hours, mosl of which were pul in by Mrs l.awsnn. (Children ill tile community joined in the project by selling chances on the quill once il was luuished. Almost 201) tickets were sold, including two to Mrs. l.awson who had become finite attached to the quilt r'.nring her labors (o pro- duce it. Tlic drawing was held recently Mrs. l.awson was on hand, not because licket holders had to be in order to win, but just because she wanted to see if whoever won Ihe quill really appreciated and wanted it. Whose name was on the ticket plucked from the bucket? Who else's but Verla Lawson. And as Mrs. Lawson, tbr1 quilt hugged tightly aboiil her. tried to grasp what had happened, then1 was mi doubt at all that the print! would indeed be cherished. liy Lc.roy 1'ope IJF'I Ilinimiv. NKW YOKKO'l'll-A yoiniK lady in New York was in- furiated when Consolidated Kdison sent her a bill for for electricity one month wlieu she was on vacation in Africa, and not in her apartment at all. Con Kd had "estimated" how much electricity she used that month because il was too bard fn into her apartment huiUliru; to read the meter. Thai's typical of meter reading annoyances that have been both utilities and (lie public in recent years. The annoyances are nothing compared to the skyrocketing cost of old fashioned manual meter reading. Ton many homes are closed in the rlav- time these days because wives work and, in the cities, meter readers don't want to UH into crime areas. In addi- tion, the readers' wanes have none way up. Remote Heading II is not surprising the iililily companies have been experiment inn lor a years with methods of remote reading of meters, ranging all the way to roving [rucks equipped with surveillance devices that could send an electronic beam through thick walls to read a meter thai had a coding device installed. These didn't gel very far. The most effective devices were tied into the homeowner's telephone line and the meter reading transferred from the lelephone central office to the utility company's com- bookkeeping system. Kirsl tried in Chicago and llonslon. this system worked well hut proved loo expensive. In will rapid acceptance. Saw Potential Bill bolh the Hell and independent telephone com- panies saw potential in remote meter reading by phone line. If a reasonable cost system could be developed, it could lie used i1 ml f( i and promptly billing electric, gas and water customers but for reading CATV program mold's, the copy counter meters on large copying machines in business offices and for such things as moni- loring fuel lank levels and largo postage meters. Kochester Telephone Co. of Rochester. N. Y., set out to develop such a syslem in 11171 and now believes il has suc- ceeded. The company's new automatic reader system was set up and began its first field trials in Rochester last December. The company has publisher! a description of how tin.1 system works and how economies in building it were achieved. As for (he perfor- mance, it says only that, so far. rcsiiiU (il c cut oui aging. The economics were achieved by combining info two units the encoder, the dala set coupler and the scanner in the home end of Die syslem and by even more streamlining at the receiving cud. Two units at the receiving cud. a com- munications terminal and a meter reading access circuit, were combined. More impor- lanlly, it was found not neces- sary to have receiving equip- ment in every telephone cen- tral office, lhal one niini-com- puler conlrollcd receiving set could handle the entire job. These technical achievements cut the initial investment and installation costs very sub- slanlially. The trade l-'.lec- trical World concluded that Hie Rochester company's work has brought automatic meler reading a long slop forward. I! could eliminate such errors as the electric bill for the young lady who was off in Africa that month. Vandalism Reported At Winthrop Firm WINTIIKOl'-Viindalisin was reported over the week- end at Ihe Peterson Imple- ment. Inc.. here. Buchanan county sheriff's officers report a two-ton de- livery truck was driven into the firm's building, knocking a hole in the wall. A 511-gallon barrel of oil was lipped over, and used oil was poured into a tractor cab. The incident remains under investigation by the sheriff's department. Cow Killed cow owned by (lary Brown, rural Jesup. was killed Monday when struck by a ear driven by Susan Van (iillern, 17. also of Jesup. She swerved on the road to avoid hitting another cow there, bill was unable to avoid Hie sec- ond animal, official.'; said. through Glasses begin week of Nov. 4 Call 398-5546, 398-5548 for information CoulM' BCIJ. Cnke Decorating (Hnx.lo) Creative Candlcmnkinij Pine Cone Wioaths Hunter's Snlety-Gunie Mnnriijenienl (Youth 8 Adults) festive fooiis and Crtihs Basic Electronics Kit Buildini] Hini-Chiistimis Crafts Religious Bodies in America Cake Holiday (Max.16) Detective Sloiy Creative Cnnillemokinn, Kiiiltinij-Cioihetimj Needlopoint'Cifiwel Christmas Oeiointion 'tohric Style" (Hin. 12 needed) I'orcnts, KnK 8 Cons Brr.ic Knit 1 Bolnes through Mulls (roative Ciindlemakina 52 302 210 101 Day Mori, Wed. Wed. Wed. Wed. Thar. Ilmis Timi- loilion Imlruc.loJ 7-9pm S88Mat. Smith 79pm SBSHat Slaff 7-9 pm SB 8 Mot. lomiinson pin S6 single cpls nm SI I 8 Mill. MO 8 Hal 9 pin SB H Mat Helljens Grove lomiinson 9 III III lincoln Center jl8tliAveS9tliSt. SW) Colico Shop, Swisliei Calico Slicip, S8 00 <-8 (HI 43 01) Mon (UBS Weil. ji.MI Woodsiili' 111 NW1 liHjion Dull, I onto' 11 IS inn yi f. Mfit am Sil X. Mill Next Quarterly Offering Begins Jan. 1 3, 1   

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