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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, October 29, 1974 - Page 4

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 29, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Thr Cedar Itaplds (iazrttr: Tues., Oct. 1971 Capitol Working atop a scaffolding, Dick Labertew, Indianola, left, and Jerry Miller, Des Moines, are painstaking in their efforts to repaint the coved ceilings of the Iowa capital. Miller says he is nearing the halfway point in the six-month job, which includes repainting the detailed original designs down to the last tiny feature. Board Approves Equipment Funding MANCHESTER-The West Delaware school board has approved taking from insurance proceeds to equip the portable schools for Ryan and to make the first payment on a three-year lease for the buildings. It was also announced that the hot lunch program will be moved into Ryan Nov. date the portables will be ready for use. The Ryan school was lost in an August tornado. Woodcarvers CORALVILLE The Iowa Woodcarvers Assn. will host a woodcarvers show next Satur- day and Sunday in the Coral- ville recreation building. All woodcarvers are welcome and the event is open to the public at no charge. Named President Hender- son has been appointed pres- ident and trust officer of the First National Bank here. He joined the bank staff in November, 1973 as executive vice-president. Criminal Charges Threatened Against Maquoketa Policeman MAQUOKETA Maquokela Police Chief Buddy Olson says he probably will file criminal charges against a suspended police officer for misuse of his position. Suspended officer Richard Stewart allegedly sought ar- rest and conviction informa- tion on the man who opposes his father in an Iowa house of representatives race. However, Olson said Mon- day lie would have to confer with the county attorney be- fore definitely deciding his ac- tion. Stewart's check on the ar- rest record of Tom Gillonn, who opposes William Stewart for the political post, was Ol- son's reason for a letter issued Oct. 21. the chief said. Supported Olson In that letter, Olson stated that regardless of the outcome of Stewart's appeal of dismiss- al for disobeying an order to shave his board, he would be dismissed. Since the letter was written, the Maquoketa civil service commission has supported Ol- son in the firing of Stewart. Olson said the charges he is contemplating against Stewart include three indictible mis- demeanors. Prosecution Rests In Fitz Trial FORT DODGE (UPI) The prosecution completed its case Monday in the murder trial of Russell 27. Wat- erloo, accused of slaying a 2- year-old girl last summer. Black Hawk County At- torney David Dntton closed out his case in Webster county district court by calling seven more witnesses, bringing the total of witnesses called by the prosecution to 27. The defense was expected to begin its case Tuesday. A Waterloo psychologist, (ierald Stragg, testified that a person with psychological patterns displayed by in tests conducted could commit a murder of the type that occurred. Stagg added that could be described as a person on the brink of mental retardation. is on trial for the .lime 6 slaying of Shelley Day in Waterloo. It Pays to Advrrllsr The laws he cited in his Oct. 21 Idler to the ousted Stewart are for misuse of his badge or position and falsely assuming to be a police officer. Bi-i-r Charge John Dooley. director of se- curity for the University of Iowa, told Olson Stewart ob- tained information about Gilloon's iirrest for possession of beer as a minor in Gilloon also was among 22-1 students arrested on the U. of I. campus in 1H7II as protes- tors against American troops in Cambodia. Gillonn was fined S50 on the beer charge and was acquitted in the dem- onstration incident. William Stewart has said that he "took no active part in investigating" a rumor about Gilloon's background and that he "was convinced it (the rumor) was unrelated to the political campaign and 1 still am after seeing the lacts re- lating it. Neither Stewart commented on Olson's statement. Program Is Considered By Handy Mlnkuff Dl-'.S MOINKS (ITU Stale lli'iillli C'oiiiMiissiniH'r Norman Pawlcwski said Mon- ila.v In- will recommend In Cm. Huhi'i-t Kay ami state officials dial they adept a ni'w typo of alcoholism Iri'iitnu'iit program for Iowa. Piiwlowski. whii Iravi-k'il Seattle, Wash., earlier this niiinlli with two members of tin- Iowa commission on aleo- holism, said ho was impressed with on avi'rsiiin thi'rapy liTatnii'iil usi'd ill tin' Schick- Shiidl hospiliil. Tin1 health commissioner said hi' would formally write Hay iiiid the alcoholism commission nii'Mibi'i's roquest- "FOKT MADISON' (UPI) Officials of the Iowa peniten- tiary here have suspended the recreation and inmate work services for prison inmates until a thorough shakedown of the inmates can be held. Warden Urn Brewer said the suspension came in the wake of the Iwo serious stab- bing at the prison which has left one inmate dead and one critically injured in the last eight days. Uncover Weapons Lee Hawkins, fil. Waterloo, remained in critical condition early Tuesday in Sacred Heart hospital here after he was stabbed following breakfast Iowa Cited As Lowest in Tuberculosis DES MOINKS (UPI) Iowa has the lowest number of tuberculosis cases reported annually of any state in the nation. Iowa State Health Commissioner Norman Paw- lewski reported Tuesday. Pawlewski credited lowans with proper precautionary measures during the Ifl.'ills through the for helping to reduce the number of TB cases in the stale, saying that the disease is usually confined to highly congested urban centers like New York and Chicago. His report came after the Iowa executive council ap- proved a continuation of a annual lease with St. I'Yancis Hospital in Waterloo, which has provided the state health department with space to conduct an out-patient clin- ic ami TB Chest X-ray pnim'uiii. Pawlewski said the clinic is "very important" in the Wat- erloo area because the incid- ence of the disease in (In- state, "shile being extremely low." is 111 highest in the stale's northeast section. Council members ques- tioned Pawlewski about a similar agreement jeinu made with a hospital in west- ern Iowa, but the commission- er said funds may not be available for such a project. ON THIS DATE in IHSfi. Israel launched an attack against F.gypt's Sinai Peninnsla. -ran ol Aduorllsl Poid for by the committee to elect Kopecky Linn County Attorney Pinkie Primrose ond Tom Shea, co-chrm. Cedar Rapids Jaycees fH 59 Collins Rd. N.E. FREE PARKING IN 1 INDALE PLAZA NORTH PARKING LOT OCTOBER 24ih thru OCTOBER 31st p.m. to 1 p.m. Nightly ADMISSION: ing that funds be used lo send a physician and Iwo nurses lo the Washington hospiliil lo view the treatment. 1'awlcwski said if approved, Iowa would be the first slale in the nation to formally rec- ommend the aversion therapy treatment of alcoholics. Become Repulsed The aversion therapy treal- inenl forces patients lo be- come physically "repulsed" ill the sight of alcohol through psychiatric counseling and the use of ii drug, normally so- dium peiiathol. At present. normal counseling and meth- ods recommended by Alcohol- ics Anonymous an1 used in the slale. "I was impressed will) what I saw ill Powlcwski siiid. "It's not the treatment of the future by any means, hul for some people, it works extremely well." The aversion treatment also enables alcoholics to maintain a "deep sleep" in contrast with present methods which allow alcoholics lo mninluin "only ii surface sleep" accord- ing to Pawlewski. Funds Available If Hie Iowa agency approves the treatment. Pawlewski said funds are available to provide Hie trip to the Washington Monday, another prison in- cident. The shakedown was expect- ed to uncover any weapons or contraband in the prisoners' cells, work or recreation areas and wiis lor their own safely. Brewer said. He said until that shake- down has been held, prisoners will be held in their own cells except for meals, medical services, visits and mail. He requested cooperation from the inmates during the search. "We feel it is necessary to the general welfare that a complete search for weapons ami other contraband take place." Brewer said. Suspects Held Brewer also reported sus- pects were being held in both stabbings although no charges had yel been filed by the Leo county attorney's office. Directing the investigation, according, to state Bureau of Criminal Investigation Direc- tor (BCD Craig Beek, is Spe- cial Agent Mike Dooley. Beek said Dooley was as- signed six months ago to permanent duty at the prison and the state men's reforma- tory in Anamosa following an agreement, between the state department of social services and the "What we've done is that social services transferred money to the BC'I for thin Beek said. "This is working real well as the man is very familiar the in- stitution and it is paying off." Council Rejects Proposal EVANSDALE (UPI) A proposal to contract for police services with neighboring Waterloo was rejected by the I'jvansihile city council Monday night. The vote of the council was 3-3. and Evausdale Mayor .loe llomolka couldn't cast the tie-breaking vote because Iowa law prohibits mayors from voting on resolutions involving spend- ing of municipal money. The resolution would have given the livansdale city gov- ernment the go-ahead to purchase services from the Waterloo police department from Nov.l to Dec. 31 at a cost of Sfi.lilil. Kviinsrialc. a Waterloo suburb of residents, has been left without its own police force since hist week when the department's six officers quit following Police Chief Floyd Warneka's refusal to resign. Since Ihen, Warneka arid reserve officers from his de- partment and Black Hawk county sheriff's officers have provided police protection for the town. The policemen who quit listed several allegations against Warneka including "negligence, failure In perform his duties and misconduct." The charges have been referred to the Black Hawk county attorney's office for investigation. About attended the council meeting, with a majority opposing the resolution. Some said it would be the first step toward a complete "take-over" of F.vansdalc by Waterloo. clinic anil set up a section of a hospiliil lor treatment ol' the alcoholics. "What we are talking about possibly is that we have, say, ii ten-bed section of a hospital for persons who could qualify for the treatment." Pawlewski siiid. "It's not one of these things that we can do overnight or something that would require that we lake over a complete hospital." Need Motivation Pawlcwski, who said about in state funds would be needed to implement Hie project, warned that not all al- coholics could be treated by the aversion therapy. "You have to be motivated for this treatment to work." Pawlewski said. "11 just wouldn't work for the skid row alcoholic. We still would use present methods of treat- ment." Pawlewski said a similar "alowa City, but approval by the version" commission would be the first time Iowa actually would conduct a statewide program to treat al- coholics with the new therapy. Luther Given Funds For Pipe Organ college has received a gift from a 1941 Luther graduate in memory of her late hus- band. .lean Prens Host. Lancaster. Pa., made the donation for a cathedral pipe organ to be placed in the proposed Center for Faith and Life. The gift was the largest in the history of Luther from a living alum- nus. Lincoln Board Sets Bond Election Date MKCIIANICSVILLE-The Lincoln community .school board has set Dec. Ill as the date for a special election on a proposed mill levy. If approved, the approxi- mate in yearly revenue raised from the 2.5 mill levy would be used for repair and remodeling of buildings. Superintendent Dale Proc- tor and school board members will be available to talk to any groups or individuals about this proposition. The Best Carpet Buys Are At Carpetland U.S.A. ADULTS-SI.00 CHILDREN'S.50 (10 ft undtir) Tossed salad? Sure. We have lossed salad, but that's not the half of it. We also have gelatin salads, fruit salads, cabbage salads, up to sixteen different salads lo choose from every day. And salads are just a few of the foods thnl bring you back to Bishops. Stop in soon. YOU'LL FIND WE'RE JUST A LITTLE BUFTI.-T Linrlak' CAFIJTlH-ilA Downtown   

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