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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 28, 1974 - Page 6

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 28, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                No crisis cures on rubber-chicken circuit Editorial Page Monday. October 28, 1974 Tale of two Rapids What flo Odar Rapids, Inwa. and Grand Rapids, Mich., have in common other than half (he name of each? At least from this uid. many citizens can testify to linkage through the irritant of rnisdelivered mail, merchandise and airline baggage. Grand Rapids, of course, is President Ford's hometown, the hub of the Michigan district that sent him to congress 13 terms ago. The most that Cedar Rapids can lay claim to in high politics are a couple of congressmen and occasionally a U.S. senator in recent years. In terms of community char- acter, Grand Rapids usually is pictured as a busy, growing (pop- ulation church-and- home oriented, fairly conserva- tive (like its famed ex-con- straight-shooting Midwestern town not too far afield from the Cedar Rapids image here. A civic profile in the New York Times magazine of (Jet. 211, however, paints Grand Rapids as more active, with-it and progressive than it customar- ily gels credit for in fact, "way ahead of its iavonte son.' One big distinction there is a locally enterprised, city-owned work by the world renowned scupltor, Alexander Calder a 42-ton red metal shape that rates as the second largest stabile in the hemisphere. Another distinction is Grand Rapids' record of move-ahead ac- tion on commonplace items of need and improvement. As writer Robert Sherrill put il in the Times: "The plain folks of Grand Kapids have not been stingy in supporting (ho standard .sort of community development. In the last 20 ycjirs they have voted In lax themselves for everything that's been put on the ballot: a new airport, a new jail, a county hospital, a juvenile court center, a library. They voted to tax themselves to build the only county mental hospital in Michi- gan. They voted to strap them- selves into a city income tux." As anyone in these parts instantly can see, therein lies a key difference between the two Rapids. The one on the Cedar has muffed more of those than have passed in the last several years. Cedar Kapids "rejected" a junior high school remodeling venture last April with 57.8 percent support. It "defeated" a library-expansion program last November with afi.3 percent support. It "beat" a similar library plan the preceding March with 54.5 percent support. It "turned down" an airport growth proposal in May of 1972 with 58 percent support. It "defeated" still another library building at- tempt late in 1969 with 55 per- cent support. Why does Grand Rapids move impressively with qualily-of-lifo expenditures while Cedar Rapids spins its wheels? One prime reason is that local projects voted on in Michigan, by law, can pass by getting just a straight majority of votes a simple edge of yeses over noes. In Iowa it takes a full three-fifths majority the notorious fifl- percent overrun that undervalues everybody voting "yes" and stymies Cedar Rapids so consist- ently in spile of strong majori- ties' support for good works. The cure for that disparity lies not in anybody's city hall but at the stutehouse. Iowa's stale legislature should give city peo- ple here the .same fair, democrat- ic chance lo grow and build that urban counterparts in Michigan enjoy as a matter of course and put to such productive use. Veterans day twice The first of Iowa's two annual Veterans days hit the calendar this week courtesy of an act of congress and a presi- dential proclamation in line with the Monday-holiday system es- tablished in The second Vel- 'erans day will take place on the standard (late of Nov. 11 (also a Monday, as it courtesy oi the Iowa legislature. Thus on V-day No. 1. mail service disappeared and all the other federal offices in town closed down uniformly for the federal part of the occasion. Two weeks later city, county and state offices, plus the state liquor slores, will knock it off for V-day No. 2. People who get neither day free (and there are thousands) will divide the inconvenience and confusion between both Veterans days, for whatever they're worth. Inescapably this duality in the observance does what critics had predicted it would do when Io- wa's 1973 legislature cut loose from the federal pattern and re- stored the original date to its ar- mistice linkage of 1918: It lessens the holiday's impact, diffuses its purpose, obscures the meaning and diminishes its importance. If that continues long enough, with neither side gelling in step wilh the other, the natural result some day could be consideration as to whether no Veterans days are more desirable than two. By Tom Wicker NEW YOHK President Fun) has I In1 Democrats in a flap uvrr his siiggos- tiiin thai if too many of them arc elected tu congress next iiiiinth, "peace could bo in jeopardy." But tins is (inly a new ver- sion of the Familiar Republican charge (hat the Democrats are the war parly, it is. in faet. I he least of Ford's transgres- sions in the fall campaign most of which have been against himself. What is he doing, anyway, at all those rubber-thicken dinners, listening In high school liatuls and humdrum po- litical oratory before making his own contributions to the latter? American history and Kurd's particular situation argue heavily against the kind of campaign effort he has undertaken. It is a well-known fact of political life that outside campaigners can rarely turn around local elections, overcome the force of local issues and personali- ties, or make people forget major na- tional questioi.s inflation and unein- ploymenl for instance. Outside cam- paigners particularly Presidents can sometimes attnicl interest lo a campaign and help net out Ihe vole. Hut even that does Mot have much effect un- less a race is close; sometimes, more- over, a Klamorous visitor drawing atten- tion to a campaign gets out Ihe vote as much lor a candidate he opposes as lor one he supports. President Kennedy. campaigning widely at mid-term in IHIil managed at Ijcst '_ and with the aid of the Cuban missile crisis thai fall lo hold onto his party's relatively narrow congressional majority Lyndon Johnson, overtly hardly at all in 1W. saw '.lie Democrats lose heavily but they :dmosl surely would have anyway be- so many had won basically Ke- jiublican congressional seals in the HIM landslide. Hichard Nixon and Spiro Agnew. in ;in extensive 19711 campaign, may well hau1 hurt their party's imrl-term and certainly cd no more than minimal gains. Ford has no majority to defend, no hope of gaining one. and not many races moon is risen close enough lor Ills cflorl lo be deci- sive. As Ihe pardoner of Richard Ni.voo and the prime manager of the national economy, he cannot do much lo counter the major issues damaging his party Watergate and inflation II apathy is part of a public reaction against politics-as-usnal. he is not likely to dispel it b.v playing And one of the major themes he has been sounding save the Republican party and the two-party system is basically defeatist and of little help to Republicans like, say, Cov. Malcolm Wilson of New York, who are trying to project an image of increasing strength and confidence Besides, is il all that important'' Many of the new Democrats who may be elected to the house, particularly from ;he South and the West, are not free- spending liberals: many, in fact, will be indistinguishable in their views from :he Republicans and Democrats they ivill replace. The Democrats have no national People's forum To UK; Editor: It is refreshing to see a political candidate state exactly what his position is on each of the issues of thi.s tioti campaign. I refer specifically to the sc- ries of advertisements in The by Mr. Ivor Stanley, a candidate for stale senator. How nice to read a concise, positive statement by Mr. Stanley on these im- portant matters. His way of saying "1 favor" or "1 oppose" is immensely sincere and honest. Other candidates could well follow such brevity and rele- vance. Irene I.. Spellinan 'JI4 Twenlv-llnrd street drive SE Sod roofs To the F.ditor: i noticed in the interesting article on "Sod in the Oct. '211 Gazette, thai there seemed lo be sonic doubt as to how the name originated. I have always been told thai il was because the early houses were actually covered with sod on the roof, not the floor. This is more practical than it sounds and would have much to recom- mend it for present day new construc- tion, if the building code would allow it. For instance, one could build a Inw- pilched roof with extra heavy rafters, (over Ihe plywood sheathing with sev- eral layers of black polyethylene plastic, put on a layer of dirt and then sod il. He would have a roof that would last a life- time, couldn't leak, would be completely immune lo hail damage and to any wind except a direct hit by a tornado, and would be cool in the summer and warm in Ihe winter, as well as fireproof. With the price of shingles going up ami the quality going down, this be- comes more practical all the lime. II might seem strange, of course, to have lo go op and use the lawnmower on the roof occasionally. Robert Smith Route 1. Swisher NEA criticized To the Editor: In the (ieorgia congressional races of 1974 the National Education Assn. has donated ir.or.cy to two representative0, .lohn Davis and Ben Blackburn's op- ponent in the general cleclion. accord- ing lo the Atlanta Journal and Constitu- tion. This was done lo help defeat con- servatives. As far back as 1834, W. (livens de- livered a typical XKA report entitled "Kducation for a .New He said, "A dying laissez-faire must be completely destroyed and all of us, including the owners must be subjected to a large decree of social control. We maintain Ihe basic Industries and utilities cannot be centrally planned and operated under private ownership." In olher words, (livens called for social- ism or control by the government. Over the years the NEA has promot- ed a variety of textbooks to further its goal of building a socialist America. One example is "The American Negro" in paperback from its black studies lisl in 1SIH7. The aulhors recommended by Ihe NEA included Herbert Aplheker. W. E. B. DuBois. Philip Foner. James Oreen. Doxey Wilkerson, and Richard Wright. They were all members of the. Communist parly dedicated to creating a Soviet America. On Jan. HI. NEA President Donald Morrison slated: "The federal government should establish standards and goals. The slate should make the decisions but Ihe federal government should control." This, of course, is in direct contrast lo our Constitution, which gives all decisions on education lo Ihe stale governments. Mr. Morrison's statement is alarmingly similar to one made by the then national chairman of the Communist party L'.S.A., William 'A. Foster, in a book called "Toward Soviet On paw Foster stated: "Among Ihe elementary measures the American Soviet government will adopt lo further Ihe cultural revolution arc the following: the schools. colleges, and uni- versities will be coordinated and grouped under Ihe national department of education and its state and local branches." I ask our teachers lo look deeply into the NF.A and discover its real function, which is lo make education a product of Ihe federal government, against the Constitution. Mollie Culver Thirty.fifth street. Marion Self-determination sfressed By Louis Harris Tl'.i: Harm By lill-lS percent, a majority ol the American people feels thai il was wrung lor I he I .'lilted Stales lo niter- vi'iie in Ihe internal allairs and lo try lo destabilise, the government of Chile." I'ic-.ideiil Ford ackno'.vled'.'od ihai 1 S intervention did lake place, al- 'hmrdi Secretary ot Stale Henry Kts- arj.'ucd that the aim ol the I.'. S. ua In insure Ihe nghl1- ol those forces Din ol power, not lo overthrow Hie ,1 ri ;'iioe of Ihe late Chilean Pi esident, Salvador Allciidc. 1'rosidcnl Allende died in a violent military coop, which o'.eiihiew Ins government iiisl over a Mar ai'n A substantial maiorily percent) thai "every (ounir.v should have iii'lii lo dcloriimio Us own govern- J h' VVIIhoill outside I'll I (rum other counlnes Traditional- tlie ol self-detenmnalion has v ii .1 i'l'iiond rule of internaliona! lav. i Ihe rich's of smaller, weaker ,i .'c-ainsl Ihe encroai Imicnl ami ..i nl puueis. of super-powers, all wilh substantial intelligence networks, each maim' na- tion maintains extensive intelligence activities in nearly every country of the world. President Ford sought to dclend C. S. intelligence activities by cilni.L' Ihe larger sums spent by cotiimnnist na- lions lor Ihe same piirposes. B> a nar- row. percent, the American people arc willini: lo accept the CIA's role as "working inside oilier cnnnlncs to try in strengthen those elements Ini'iidh in the C. S. and to weaken an'i-C forces The heart ol Ihe controversy over American intervention in Chile is how to reconcile CIA operations (leaned !o aid pro-l S. elements vviln Ihe nniversalh accepted rule ol solf-dolcrmmalion. loaked III lop seciecv, CIA normally remain unknown evept In Hie highest olficials ol Hie agency, tne Pentagon, the VUii'i1 House and sclcci cnlllllllMl'C- ill Tlicle wen- Widespread lepolls ol 'he 10 I lille al the linn- and i h.iii'i s o1. Mlende ol'-meni- ftia' VI..T b.v 'he I A I III' I v i- pal III oial Iv V lijoi-l lo attack these days because ol the mi- n-niir m ulnioiisly raised resolved over possible a-enev American people involvement in Water-ale acliuiicv aboi ir loreiun inlelh-eiice operations When asked In rate Ihe job the CIA i-, m -eiieral and the CIA in particular doini; "as Hie chief loreiL'n nee Alui ,.mlld cause a decline aL'eney ol the I S i-inernm-nl." the eonlidcnec in Secretary of Slate public il no heller than Kissmiier here al home. peicenl negative markv hardly a vole conhdeine Nevertheless, at the mniiiciii. lir Secreiarv el Slate is still highly regarded by Ihe C S rat s in Chile lia-, re. American people. I.alc last monlh. a porledly stemmed Horn orders on-mat- ol adnlls was asked in- wilh him as head ot a secret lederal o.ilionwide. seenritv lo en-ace in inu'" activities in thai Louis Harris M Uhenaske )r iiselnl- pretty ne-s would be impaired if alhralions of his involveiiicnl in CIA aeliv ilv in Chile proved In be true. IS percent ol Ihe pub- he that H vviiiild dam- his nseliilness as secretary ol slate and .iii.iihei :il percent ted it uould u.-doi. ooh him linenilhree No' fi people stale Hallv thai even it such proof about a Kissinger rule Chile vveie II uoold liol nilliicin e at all I'.vcn Ihom.di llr Kissinger has some- wh.il slipped in public lavor since last Mav he eomniatids far more re- iiit-r, in Ihis year ol dashed conhdcnce in Ihe government. Bill rcMardless of Kissinger's aehicvemenl and policy al larye. Ihe policy of C S. inlcrveiilion in Chile slands roundly condemned by American public opinion Amom' those Americans who vvanl their public olficials to level with them and keep coverl L'ov eroi'ico' activities lo ii minimum. Iheie is likely In be a demand lor loll disi Insure ol the role ol Ihe CIA. pai In olarh where its .iclivilies In1 in conllic! with the nuhl of oilier nations lo sell-de- tcrminalion. nro.eram. no national leader, mil moderate-lo-conservative congres- sional leadership. There simply is not nuch chance that a runaway Democrat- ic coimress will Ihe initiative from in incumbent Republican President anil the country off to inllationary ruin. for Ford himself, conventional political analysis that, if he is set upon winning his own term and impo.siim his own leadership upon the country, he should have (a) disassociat- ed himself more than he has from the discredited Nixon administration, and immediately moved to show himself as a national leader of broad outlook talhcr than as a narrowly partisan leader of a minority party. Instead, the pardon and the reluc- tance Ford has shown to part wilh the Nixon holdovers in the government make him appear more and more a lin- eal descendant "Son of Nixon Ad- as Hollywood miKht cast him His highly publicixed fall cam- paign with ils partisan rhetoric re- cently becoming makes him sound more and more like a small- bore Republican wheelhorse. Ford is doiiiK the work of a party chairman, or of the chairman of the house Republican campaign commitlec; il may be important Work but only rare- ly in American history has it been use- ful or effective for a Presidenl to do it. He is certainly sealing his grip on the Republican presidential nomination, if he wants it: but he almost certainly had that anyway, and it will lie worth little unless he can broaden his appeal be- yond Ihe minority Republicans to the in- dependents and moderate Democrats he will have lo attract in the 1971! general election. Ford has defended his political campaign b.v saying it's more useful for him lo listen lo the people than to be in seclusion in his Oval office. As a gener- al proposition that may well be true; but Americans are a broader and more var- ied people than those who buy tickets to Republican party dinners. It's a safe bet that, for the most part, they'd lell C.er- ald Ford, if they could, that they don't consider this year's elections anywhere near as important as inflation, unem- ployment and the energy crisis. Justified 'loophole' To the Editor: Michael Blouin seems lo be proving Ihu old adage that one half-truth can he more misleading than two outright lies. As one example, his remarks on taxes at Prairie school, as reported in the Oct. 17 He said that a person wilh in wages pays income tax. a person with profit on stock pays only on that, while someone gelling Ihe same amount in interest on lax-free bonds pays no taxes on it. Thai S% figure is true only if Ihe family has no other income. A retired school teacher and wife with a pension and that profit might pay lax on the profit. It should be noted that the purpose of tax-free bonds is to provide properly lax relief. That "loophole" is what allows our city lo borrow money al less than (i percent today while corporations must pay 9-10 percent. If municipals were not tax-free, the people of Cedar Rapids would have lo pay more than half a million dollars a year more in interest on our present bonded debt. There are proposals to have that money go in a circle: the city pay 9 percent. Internal Revenue tax the person who receives the interest, then Ihe federal government pay the city a subsidy. It looks cumbcr- and might not work. As lo Blouin's statement that there were over 401) persons last year with in- comes over who paid no income tax, an analysis of similar reports for 1970 furnished lo me by Ihe U. S. treas- ury department suggests his slalemenl is incorrect lie probably should have said: "no U. S. federal income fox." American citixens working in other countries report their entire Income lo the United Stales but pay income tax there, just as foreigners working in the Cniled Stales pay income lax lo the United Stales, not lo their own coun- tries. Also, (he amount called "income" in the source Blnnin used should, to he precise, be titled "income before subtracting costs and losses." Many of the 4111) had losses equal to or more than their incomes; some may have gone bankrupt. The Ireasury analysis is loo lengthy to attempt lo cover it here. Any- one interested in seeing il or discussing it is welcome lo conlacl me for tlmi purpose, David W. Prndden 213R (irande avenue SE LETTERS Tlio Gazette's prign wnlcomps1 readers' opinions, subject lo (lioso guidelines: trrajll. limit: <00 woifK On.. I..O.V wnlrr -vrr, 10 -hy. None nrtonymcnnly Writer's h-lpiihoim mimbm (nnl dioulrl lollnw ririmr-. mirtrcu nnl lo.nlnlilo hondwnllnn 'O I'flp OUllfnlKOlp Contain dnnl more wilh muni jjml rwnnh Ilinn per sonnl.liM Hn poetry   

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