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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 26, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Beverly Sills Cancer Surgery Called a Success NKW YORK Sills, one u-nrld's Ki-i'ul opcralic siipnirius, wiis in salisfiicliiry nindi- liim Friday after wlml VIM 'In- scribed ns siiirctisful siirwry fur removal nf ii L-iinror in her pelvic area. "The operation was a lotal a spokeswoman (or Ihe sinner said, "and we'll know liy Monday whether she needs any further treatment. If not, a very speedy recovery is anticipated. 'A malignancy was re- moved, in the pelvic area." The 45-year-old star of the New York City opera was up- u.Ued on Thursday in New York hospital. She had flown hack from Dallas, where she had been rehearsing for a new ic Opera production of 'Uicretia child entertainer on radin and later a cast member in snip operas, Miss Sills made her debut with Ihe New York City Opera in 1955. In HKiil, recognized as one of the great- est of all sinKing actresses, she debuted at I.a Scala in Milan. She is scheduled lo make her Metropolitan Opera debut next April in "The of Corinth" and to open the Met's III75-7B season in Ihe same opera. Married In Peter (Ireen- iiUKh. former financial col- umnist of the Boston (Hobo. Miss Sills is the mother of two. Physical examination and last week reportedly indicated that the cancer op- eration was necessary. But Miss Sills had been hopeful of putting it off until a scheduled vacation in December. In addition lo her Dallas performance, she also had appearances scheduled next month with the San Francisco Opera and with Ihe New York City Opera ill Los Angeles. Traffic Jam Foils KOMK (I'PI) Home's rush hour traffic chaos foiled a bank robbery, police said. They said armed, masked men successfully hold up a downtown bank, but were forced to leave the Ino: in their aulomobile and flee on fool when they got hopelessly snarled in a lunch hour traffic jam. Police KUXT chase and arrested two suspects. The Cedar llaplds (iazdtc: Sat., Oct. 26, 1971 Big George! Virgil Partch Plate-Smashing Symbol Of New Freedom "Why diin't you boycott ihe croci-iics fora Theater Time for Saturday limes have been MARION Features at II. supplied by Hie following 1. 3. 5, 7, H. II. Ihejilers for Hie eunveiiienee nf renders. ATIIKNS (AIM Hate- smashing has come back in fashion in Greece, a (if Hie freedoms sweeping Ihis an- eienl hind after (he enllilpse (if the military dictalorship I wo months ajio. The colonels ruled (ireece for seven Ionj4 years had millawcd bill now Hie nf bniken crockery can be heard everywhere. Radical chances have laken place, however, in all aspects of Hreek life in the arts, vaudeville, the press and in politics, a (Greek's favorite topic of discussion The ordinary now lalks polilics openly, passiona- lely and willioul Tear of beiriK nverfieard. Cartoons Political cartoons in the newspapers make fun nf Ihe former military junta. Musical reviews members of Ihe junla are allraeliiiK law crowds. 'Explosive' Mail Backfires COMMUNITY THFATKH ".labberwock" H. WOULD "Tarain and the .Innt-le Boy" :i; "Truck Turner" Brown" COLLINS "The Teacher" KACCCLA. Sicily (UP1) "The Police Woman" The letter Anioniella Caruso. "The Italian Conner- Hi. boyfriend in linn" _ Palermo was so ardent that she thought a warniim was in TWIN WKST "The Scum order. of the Kartli" "The "Explosive Idler." she Poor While Trash" wrote on Ihe outside. "The Shanty Tramps" When a mail sorter saw what was written on the envelope, he called a bomb disposal expert, TWIN KAST "The Office "e found nothing but police KASTOWN I "The Re- Cirls" "linn. Virgin, char.ued Anioniella wilh caus- Itint of the Dragon" Him" "The Dirtiest a false alarm, for which !l.25 (iirl 1 Kver Met" she could wl up lo six months in j.iii. KASTOWN 2 ".leremiah Johnson" Kxiled (Jrook composers such as Miki Theodorakis arc' back and WTilinj; music to poems written by leftists such as Ihe Nobel Pmo-winninj.: Chilean. Pablo Nenida, and Creek Y .-Minis Kitsos Many of the jokes heard those days center on ousted dictator (leow Papadopoulos who engineered the army coup which suspended democracy in this country. PapadnjxHilns. a former army colonel was toppled by other, even toucher army of- ficers last November. They relinquished power to a civilian government headed by Premier Constantino Cara- maulis after the Cyprus crisis brought a Turkish invasion of Ihe island. Brand New One anli-jnnla joke makini; the rounds noes Ihis way: A scientist went lo a brain bank in Ihe year and picked out a specimen lo rent. "That was Napoleon's brain." Ihe bank director says. "II costs month." The scientist pointed lo a second. "Kinsfein's says the director. "That's a week." The scientist indicated a third. "That's a day." says Ihe director. "It belonKod (u former Greek dictator (ieorKe Papadoponlos. It's brand new; never used." The pri'ss, restricted durum Ihe dietalorship, suddenly came alive after Ihe collapse of the junta. Its free wheeling reporlorial style and hold headlines decorate every kiosk in the country. Recently several dailies splashed reports that former junta lenders had left for abroad with fortunes amassed during the dictatorship. "Michalos is now livini; in London." one newspaper said abonl ex-minister loannis Michalos. A letter from Michalos the next day showed he had never left for London, and all other junta leaders arc still in Greece. Such reporting led the un- dersecretary of press and in- formation. PanaKhiotis I.ambrias, lo denounce (he Creek press as "the yellowest in Ihe world His statement created a storm of protest, lint no change in (he press, Vaudeville Ihe dictatorship vaudeville had been performed "wilh a noose around its in Ihe words of one theater owner. But that has all changed. Comedy skits, frequently off-color, make fun of the former military rulers. Another favorite target is U.S. Secretary of State Kissinger, accused by many Greeks of favoring Turkey during the Cyprus crisis. Kissiuuer is portrayed by comedians as wearing a the traditional Turkish hat and smoking opium gnm in an Oriental water pipe These performances are hearlly applauded. On Campus Tile politcal change has also swept through Ihe nation's campuses and among many of the students enrolled at Greek universities. Several student demonstra- tions were held at Salnnica and Athens universities to express opposition lo U.S. foreign policy. Professors who had been appointed by the military regime were either dismissed or suspended. The anti-governmcnl student uprising last November at Athens Polytechnic Instilnte, in which the military regime said l.'l persons were killed, p rec i pi la I ed Pa p a d o pou I os' downfall and undermined the military junta which succeed- ed him. An official investiga- tion has been opened into student charges that at least 101) persons were shot by police, civil and military. People at sidewalk cafes dis- cussing politics no longer stop talking when a policeman approaches. This is in sharp contrast to what occurred during the dic- tatorship when students and boisterous coffee sippers were suddenly rounded up and taken in for questioning when heard Ihe junta. lilrkrrinK Appearing Plate-smashing, once described by a Greek psychoanalyst as an expensive way of releasing frustrations, is back in fashion with no fear of arrest by police. The junta had banned plate-smashing in its efforts to "purify" the Greek way of life. Despite the return of freedom, a feeling of uncer- tainty simmers under the sur- face because of inflation and Uie political situation. Many Greeks are sharply divided over the immediate political (nurse of the country. Bicker- ing between political forces is reappearing. Newspapers representing ultra-right-wing and left-wing groups are demanding the government delay calling elec- tions until political parties and the nation are hotter prepared. Other dailies, expressing the present administration's views, are calling for elections as soon as possible in order for a democratically elected government to confront the country's economic and social ills. BRING THE FAMILY AND JOIN THE FUN) CANCER SOCIETY NOW thru TUES. 7 P.M. Saturday Till 1 1 A.M. Sunday CROWN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES presenl IHE ALL PROCEEDS GO TO AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY URBAKA FEED IMPLEMENT ON 4th Street Between 1 st and 2nd Avenues FAMILY FUN CENTER SHE CORRUPTED THE YOUTHFUL MORALITY OF AN ENTIRE SCHOOL! SATURDAY "UNTOUCHABLES" fanluring Tom Hankins, Dnn SUNDAY "THE DO'S AND DON'TS" PRESENTS "SOURCE" FRI. SAT. OCT. 25 26 LINDALE PLAZA Under New Management HALLOWEEN DANCE vow FRI PITCHERS FRI R SAT 75c SHELLS 1? PAK DRAWK4GS COSTUME PRIZE The man who became a legend. The film destined lobe a 
                            

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