Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 25, 1974 - Page 6

Share Page

Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 25, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Editorial Page Frnioy, October 25, Food-parceling hinges on buy-power shift National referendum is out On the too few times they have made joint appearances, the major party candidates for Sec- ond district congressman usually are asked to spell out their views on abortion. State Sen. Michael Blouin. the Democratic candidate, says he opposes abortion as a matter of conscience. State Sen. Tom Kiley, the Republican candidate, says he personally opposes abortion but believes it is a matter better left to personal choice; that he should not sit in judgment of what others should or should not do. Pressed further, Blouin fa- vors a proposed amendment to the Constitution, now in com- mittee, which would overturn the U.S. supreme court's decision by outlawing abortions, except where the woman's life is en- dangered. Blouin's one condition is that the amendment would have to win approval of the peo- ple at a national referendum. Riley opposes the proposed amendment. Blouin's condition is an in- teresting one for the reason that there is no provision in the U.S. Constitution for a national refer- endum to ratify, or reject, pro- posed amendments. When asked about this, Blouin explains that the referendum route was used to ratify the 18th (prohibition) and IDtli (women's suffrage) Amendments. But Library of Congress records show that these amendments were rati- fied by the legislatures of three- fourths of- the states. This is one of the two methods provided in Article V of the Constitution for ratifying, or rejecting, proposals to amend it. That part of Article V reads: "The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Ap- plication of the Legislature of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Pur- poses, as Part of this Con- stitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress In other words, there is no way the referendum route could be used to ratify an amendment short of amending the Constitu- tion to provide for it. Further research indicates that congress almost always has chosen the ratification-hy-legis- lature route in submitting amendments to the states. The latest instance when the conven- tion route was used was in I fl.'W for the 21st Amendment to repeal the 18th (prohibition) Amend- ment The Iowa convention, com- posed of delegates (one per met on July 10, with GO of the delegates present and voted unanimously to repeal the prohibition amendment. But until the Constitution it- self is amended to provide for a referendum route to ratification, that route is permissible neither for the abortion idea nor for any other proposed amendment. Horsehide have-nots hungry When the Oakland Athlet- ics seized professional baseball's world title two years ago, this corner hailed the achievement as a tonic for the national pastime. The A's, after all, are the direct kin twice removed of the old Philadelphia A's whose last feast (three straight Depression era pennants) was followed by four decades of famine. The Oakland club's 1972 World Series victory refreshingly recalled recent rags-lo-riches leaps by the Baltimore Orioles (nee St. Louis Minne- sota Twins (old-time Washington Senators) and expansionist Nesv York Mets. But enough is enough. The Athletics' third consecutive stranglehold on baseball honors. People's forum coupled with owner Charles Finley's obnoxious-eccentric behavior, makes one hope for a new champion next season. The nominee here is the Texas Rangers, second place fin- isher behind Oakland in the American League's western divi- sion. True, the most deserving successor on the basis of long- time suffering would be Chi- cago's Cubs, whose last pennant coincided with this country's wartime win over Japan. But the Rangers not only have the strength to de-dynastixe Oakland, they have a sufficiently pathetic- past to qualify them as senti- mental favorites. For who are those rambunctious, hard-hitting Rangers but the recently trans- planted Washington Senators'.' To Ihe Editor: .Now that the sensational trials are OUT. I wonder at Ihe true conseiineiucs in punishing the innocent. As the sister (if Michael S. Srr.oy. I admit to having a biased view on Ihe outcome of these trials. Von will recall Ihe killing of Michael Servey and Maureen Connolly b> one George .luniiir Now Mil. wilh Ihe assistance of Alwell Junior Conner. How sadly ironic It Is when, after such a slaughter. Ihe punishment is as- signed. One can only wonder who is punished. Is it two criminals, justly convicted and scut In prison? Oi- ls it me, or any taxpayer, knowing thai my taxes are being spcnl with the as. surance that these two men are being fed and clothed for Ihe rest of their lives in a safer surroundini: than in their own homes? Somehow, those of us who knew Mike and Maureen lake little consola- iioii in ihis punishment. Whoever would change men must change the condition of their lives. Theodor Consecutive life sentences hardh case my mind when I Hunk of how two such beautiful children died Diane Soney Krebs Koiilc Solon W blood W DIUUU By Anthony Lewis Oil Ihe cntTcnl (rends nf populalion and food production, according lo in- ternational experts, by 1885 the pool- countries of the world would need Sr> million tons u( grain a year from out- side. In a year of bad harvests the need could In1 lllll million tuns, or even more. Like other statistics, that projection has an abstracl ring In il. But il is lit- erally a matter of life and death, and il presents a formidible challenge lo hu- man h er prese man "We couldn't even move lilt) million tolls of grain an American offi- cial remarks "not across the world in any limited time. Kemember how (im- ports and railroads were fouled up when the Russians bought IS million tons from us." Before Ihe problem of moving that much food, there are the questions of how to gnnv il and tn pay for it. Al to- day's prices. 1IH1 million tons of cereals would cost something approaching Slill billion. Haiti and Bangladesh and the :il other food-short countries will not have Ihe foreign exchange to pay for il. Who will1.' Thai is the scale of the issues facing the World Komi Conference in Home starting Nov. 5. Public discussion of the food problem understandably tends in focus on immediate mailers, such as (he amount of American aid to hold off imminent mass starvation in South Asia. Bnl Ihe conference is meant lo lake a longer view, and that means dealing with the most fundamental is- sues of population, resources and Ihe wealth of nations. The Rome conference is lo have countries participating. No such meet- ing can he expected (n come up wilh concrete solutions for the world's food needs. Nevertheless, stale department officials preparing for the conference seem modestly hopeful of agreed prog- ress in defining Ihe problems. They sketch these points: I. Kslimales of food shortages differ ill delail, bill there is now general agreement that the less developed countries face a very large and con- Hulling deficil. '1 The old concern about over-pro- dnction and surpluses in the West is dis- appearing. A symbolic indication of the change occurred the other day. After years of badgering the Common Market lo keep its doors open for larger pur- chases of American grain, the United Slates successfully urged Ihe market lo buy less Ihis year. 3. Then' must be intensified interna- tional efforts to increase food production in the less developed counlries. for ex- ample by scientific improvements in tropical agriculture. But for Ihe foresee- able fnlure there will be dependence on imporls from a handful of surplus countries, primarily the I'nited Stales, Canada, Australia. Argentina and Un- common Market. 4. In the past the United States has carried about 85 percent of Ihe world's grain reserves. Just about everyone agrees thai that is no longer possible, either physically or politically. The reserve responsibility must be spread. The first necessity, according lo Ihe Americans preparing for the Home con ference. is to agree on Ihe volume of reserves needed. Then there is the ques- tion of who should contribute how much lo the reserves and where they should be held in what would amount to an international system of national re- serves. The American idea is that these con crete. difficult issues of reserves should be considered after Rome at a negotiat- ing '--oMfen'iic" among the major grain exporting countries and the big consist- ent impnrlers: India. Pakistan. Bang- ladesh, Japan, the Soviet Union and China. All of Ihe Ihniiglil on reserve mecha- nisms, hard as il is, only louches the surface of the world fond problem. Underneath there is Ihe question of money Ihe need for Ihe less devel- oped countries to have enough nf il so the United States and others can go all- production for Ihem. Aid can hardly make a dent in Ihal need. In (he linig run there must be real transfers of purchasing power, and Ihal in turn raises Ihe whole ipieslion of the oil producers and their responsibility as well as ours. Some things grow 74 Government reports go anti-suburb fi Ue are pa> ing onr coiiL'ressmen OUT a year, to which they just uiicd themselves a percent raise. Thai sala- rv is five or six times more than ihc of the working population of the S. receives. Yel some 01 our (ongressmcn arc cmni' Ili.e tin will By William Safire WASHINGTON An agglomeration of federal bureaucrats, foundation offi- cials, social planners and nobly motiva- ted land-use freaks have taken advan- tage of the energy faddism and the depression in the homebuilding industry to launch an attack mi Ihe single-family house. The Urban Land Institute, which prefers In see people clustered together in apartment houses, issued a report last week blasting "energy-inefficient patterns nf which is founda- lionese for a development of single-fam- ily homes in the suburbs. Hnssell Peterson, chairman of the Council of Environmental Quality, is in that report as saying: "We have long taken for granted that single- family houses were the standard pattern nf development in the suburbs and thai they were the cheapest and most effi- cient way for fiscally responsible sub- urban communities to grow Both of these assumptions have now been pretty much discarded." This week, as if by orchestration, another report by a real estale con- sultant firm at a cost lo taxpayers of was issued uilh great pride by ils sponsors. Ihe Km irnnmenlal Protection Agency, the department of and sure enough, Peterson's council. "The Costs of Sprawl" is the loaded title of Ihis study, and ils conclusion is that Ihe single-family house is the most cosily to build, most wasteful to operate type of housing possible. Moreover, sin- gle-family homes pollute Ihe have to return to work afler Ihe vember elections What we need desperately are congressmen who will put in a full year s work each year for the people who elected them. The executives of the companies here in Cedar Hapids and all across Ihe country are pulling in a good many HI- and 12-honr days and quite a few Saturdays and Sundays all year. II they didn't, they would soon be looking for another job. Especially if their com- pany began showing a loss and the debt increased each year as it has been doing fur many years in tins company called the Tinted Slates. You and I had a Iliree-day weekend lo celebrate Labor day and Ihe end nf summer. Our overworked congressmen look about two weeks though we. Ihc people, are still laced witii energy inflation, [nod shortages and i national debt thai staggers Ihe unagi- lalion. Right now onr congressmen arc nil stomping around the coiinlrysidc campaigning for election or re-election of Iliemsehes or a pally member are working in their own interests in- stead of on the people's problems, yet Ihe people. Maybe Watergate i-. now behind n-.. but (here are mall) more urom.'s throughout Ihe I'nited Ihal need be righted h appears Ilia! mir congressmen now in office ruhcr can1! do the lob or don'! can-. MI n hr lime III Mile .Igalllsl Midi rc-dei phere and drain communities of ser- vices much more readily than do apart- ment houses. As if it were not enough to castigate the typical American house as a smoke- belchiug oil-waster, it is condemned elsewhere as an uneconomic anachron- ism. "When and if housing does re- the current Time in- tones, "inflation is likely to cause one basic change in ils pattern: Concentra- tion on Ihe free-standing, single-family house may well be nver." Concentration on news may well be over a lot sooner, in my view, than concentration on single-fami- ly homes, and envirocrals will be rock- ing away their old age in high-rise cubi- cles while more Americans will be spending dollars for shelters or places to call their own with picket fences and backyards. If the sloganeers of the homewreck- ing lobby force us to choose between the equally pejorative terms of sprawl and crowding, I'm for sprawl. Not out of a romantic hearkening back to the good old days. INI! because the future of well- planned communities of single-family dwellings affects the kind of economy we will have and the kind of nation we will be. The dramatic rise in home ownership has done more for economic stability than any other single fact of the past generation. The revolution thai started in Leviltown, Long Island, after World war II introduced equity into the estates of over :tt! million families. I'rban planners may sniff at the "dreariness" of the Iract house, but it is a lot less dreary to the people who have raised have enough cnergv lo sohe a few of Ihe problems nf the entire coinlry Communism To the Kdilor In response lo a letter Oct. 23 sup- porting Ihe I'XICKF program: What's Ihe matter with a in wing. pro-Amer- ican, bate the communist CNICKF group'.' We do not base our position on a note from a couple of church groups which we know arc infiltrated with "lef- tists." II is likely the bewildermcnl of the floor children who go about solicit- ing, and are lectured lo abonl the evils of coiminniism and CXICKK. should he laid at Ihe door of Ihe local sponsors. The sn-called allegations coiiecniing CMCKF's being a communisl front are not mere hearsay, but are from (1) The Dally People's World. Ihe nflicial comiinniisl newspaper in Ihe C. S and Cl'i the Congressional Kccprd, which lists complete accounts of several de- bates between light and lefl wingers, one uf which was won by Ihe in Ihis case with the donation of mil- lion of I'Mf'KI-' money for aggression against anli-coinmnnisl Kalanga In bomb hospitals, schools and oilier bru- talities In convert them to communism Thai was hack III Illlil bill let's not Inri'ct it Katanga is now a eoininuiiisi families there and sold to new families at a considerable profit. In fad, home buyers of a decade ago are considerably belter off then renters or slnck-buycrs. The single-family home is a conservatmng force, as candidates in suburbia will altest. It responds to a human need of privacy or castlehood thai even planners acknowledge has psychic value. But in this day and age. we are told, the average man cannol afford such if inefficient use of energy doesn'l discourage him, the high cost'of building will. Thai need nut he so. The cosl of construction labor is maintained at an artificially high level by the Davis-Bacon act, a sop to the most inflationary unions, and local building codes make it difficult In intro- duce modern techniques and materials. One day this interference with the free market will end. onr current recession finally puts a crimp in the rate of inflation, a potential homebuyer will have less in- iiTi'ni In pay and will find banks de- manding less of a down payment. A sin- gle-family residential building recovery will take place early in the normal turn of the business cycle, as long as our well-intentioned urban planners do not succeed in changing public policy to- ward the individual home. That policy is oncouragc homehuy- ing. We permit interest mi mortgages lo be deducted from income taxes. We also have Federal Housing Administration insurance of mortgage loans, in the most successful New Deal experiment of all. which has made possible the build- I am permitted In quole from a letter from W. ('Icon Skousen. who is a staunch American but not a John Birch Society member: "The Communist party is manifestly frightened by the possibility of Ihe people of Ihe U. S. becoming awakened. Communisl suc- cess has always been achieved in an atmosphere of secrecy, deceit and confusion. The John Birch Society was therefore one of the groups marked for annihilation because it was becoming highly successful in awakening Ihe American people. Only two oilier groups have generated this much hale and fury from communist leaders. One is Ihe FBI and Ihe oilier the house committee on un-American activities ing of Ihe suburbs while Ihe FHA breaks even or shows a small profit. Hardly a claim other government agencies can make. Apartment houses are fine, as are qnadruplex condominiums, lownhouso clusters and monage-a-lrois mobile homes, if Ihal is what the customer prefers. But diversity and individuals are the hallmarks of democracy, and the affordable single-family house should conlinue to be encouraged as an available choice lo the coming genera- tion. Way with words LETTERS The GazoHe't editorial page roodors' opinions, lo those guidelines: Length limit: 400 wordi. writer cvory 30 dayi All may be condontod and txlitod without changing Nona pubtiihed anonymouily. Wtitor'l r.umbor (not printed) ihould follow nomo, oddriin and roodabU Kandwritton lignntun) to rtfllp nulhinticultv Comanti deal more with iiiuoi rtion fwu- ionolitiei No By Theodore M. Bernstein One recent entrant into (he language is groupie. William Voelcker of Phila- delphia asks about its meaning and derivation. and both questions be answered ill a single sentence. A grou- pie, when the word first came into use, was a teenage girl who was so enrap- tured by a rock group or any kind of ce- lebrity that she would follow her idols wherever they appeared. Another perhaps more recent mean- ing of the word has to do with young people who live together cither on vaca- tions nr for long spells. The similar word grouper applies to such people, particularly if they engage in group sexual activities, and likewise to members of therapy encounter groups. a Now for a little fun. An anagram, as everybody knows, is a word made by rearranging Ihe letters of a given word mad made from dam, for example. P. C. lloell nf West Chester. Pa., thinks you may he amused or at least kept awake tonight by working on one set he sent in. lie started from Ihe word CHATK and .got seven other words out of it. Don't look now, but his seven appear below. Word oddities. A word thai cropped up in (he news qnile often recently was enosis, and .1 If. Hughes of Xorrislown. Pa., is baffled by it. II derives from Ihe new Greek nonosis, which in turn de- rives from the Old (irccl; donoun, lo unite, and il means union. Specifically it refers to a political movement In bring about the political union nf (irecce and Cyprus. In thai movcmenl lay Ihe origin of all the recent doings o Moro oddities. Talk that skirls around a subject or lends lo be mislead- ing or ambiguous is called words. What, one may ask, has a weasel got to do with U.' Apparently the coiineclioii is with the weasel's manner of eating eggs sucking out Ihe con- tents and leaving the shell looking in- tact Pretty sly fellow. Hie weasel Here a list ol anagram- recta (plural of Iraci i ret a (a i ailc. cieat Indian herhi   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication