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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 25, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                [8HOW: Alfi FtOW W W6ATKE8 POtOCAJT Chance of rain Friday night from the central Gulf coast to the mid-Mississippi and Ohio-Tennessee valleys to the Atlantic coast. Rain is also expected over parts of Washing- ton, Idaho and New Mexico. The Weather Friday, and of Anchorage 41 35 .01 L Angeles 75 59 Atlanta 71 47 Miami 78 73 Bismarck 14 Min'apolis 71 3B Chicago 68 55 N Orleans 76 47 Denver ..57 41 .01 New York 58 47 Duluth -----63 33 Phoenix 84 63 Honolulu ..8876 Seattle 6247. Houston ...77 64 .01 Washington 51 Extended Fair and mild Sunday. Highs in the GOs and tows in the Partly cloudy Monday and Tuesday. Highs in the 50s and lows in the C. R. Weather 76 63 High Thursday Low overnight Noon Friday 2 p.m Precipitation Total for October 0.88 Normal for October i 2.21! Normal through October .29.39 Normal through Octiber ..29.39 Total for 1974 '10.80 Barometer, rising 30.34 Humidity al noon Magistrate's Court Siieedhis; Joyce Kayes. 3000 J street SW; lined and cu.sts. Michael Bowkcr, 723 Seventh street SW; Allyn Johnston, Fairfax; Jean Mar- zen, 212fj North Tovvnc court NE; Curtis Meggers, Indepen- dence; Ronald Behnkcn, Man- chester; John McGlynn. 3050 Harold court SE; Daniel Bcr- nackc, 1815 Eastern drive SW; each fined and costs. Douglas Miller, Manchester; fined and costs. Barbara Hurst. 41 Fourteenth avenue SW; Kirkland West, 14US Hill- sidc drive NW; Jeffrey Schuh, Marion; Earl Baugh, Waterloo; Marvin Aldrich, Central City; David Henrickscn, St. Olaf; ..63 James Northvicw Cress, 59. Sunday at 2, Chapel of Memories, Cedar Rapids. Visitation al Cedar Memorial after noon Saturday and at the chapel after 11 Sunday. place NE: LnVerne Ganoc, Central City; Patrick Vance, Fairfax; Kimelu Nelson, 0301! Sixteenth avenue SW; Kobin Kccsc, Lisbon; each fined and costs. Traffic signal viotiilion 1 street NE; Kahnoni, 524 Seventh street SE; Margaret Burns, 111 Park Wind direction and velocity at I court SE; Gene Mitchell, West 2 p.m. N al 9 mpn. Sun rises Saturday, sun j sets, Year Ago Today High, low, 45; rainfall none. Traveler's Forecast Liberty; Allen Johnson, Straw- b Pojnl O.ldl fincd ?15 .md Saturday AVeallier, Hl-I.n TOnnan-k Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland DCS Moines Detroit. Indianapolis Kansas City Milwaukee Mpls.-St. I'aul Omaha St. Louis Sioux Falls Fair .PtCldy (ifi-17 ..PtCkly (13-49 PtCldy Sli-42 Drivinfr on wrong: side jMaurecn Malnibcrl. Grove court SE; fined and costs. Driver's license violation .loan Bunlinrr, Ki-H) Vattcyview drive, Marion; fined and costs. Iloljin Peacock, 1124 Cheyenne road NW; Dar" Bntierfickl, 4316 Center Point road NK; each fined ?lf> and .....Fair eosts. Pirlrlv Faulty rriininiirnl Calvin ......11U Pierce, I3H Fourth street NW: .PtCldy BG-41 Cloudy (i7-SO .....Clear (11-411 Fair .PtCldy (i7-47 .Cloudy (ifi-41) ........Fair Ii0-3li Degree Days Thursday Total to date nailiel Bullerficld. Centei Point road NK; each fined iind costs. Intoxication Howard Lindscy, Hiawatha; fincd and costs-. Itcspnnsitiility for minnrs Arlita Vallourncy, 1320 Center 5i Point, road NE; fincd and .'noi Mississippi Stages (Flood stascs in brackets) LaCrosse (12) 4.7, Lansing (18) 7.6, fall .1 Dam (Ill) 12.4. iinehaiiscd McGregor (18) fi.7, unchaniicd Giittcnbcri; (15) 3.8, fall .1 Dubucille (17) 7.1, unchanged Davenport (In) 4.2, rise .2 Kcokuk (Hi) 2.3, fall .3 Cellar at no change c.u. Coralville Lake Pool level Friday Births Mercy Oct. 21 Mr. and Mrs. Karl Kriiinbhnlz, 211 FleeUTOod road SW, a daughter. I i Veliicle control violation Michael Kleinschmitt, Clarks- villc; fined and costs. Paul Nash, li.'il Twenty-ninth street NE; fincd S20 rind costs. Accident, damage to vehicle Rny Andrews, Hiawatha; fined and costs. Striking unattended vehicle Dorcen Bruce, (ill) First street SW: .lack Brookhousc, F-'.ly; each filled and costs. Iowa Deaths Wellman Emma Longwcll, 7K. Saturday at 2. Asbury Unit- ed Methodist, church. Powell's, Wellmim. Dysart Mae McNamee, 5B. Saturday at '2. Trinity United Mil I red Edwin fttl. Sunday Births St. Luke's Waukun Marvin Beiskoi Saturday at Martin's. Burial: Council Hill cemetery, Mononu. Herman H. Independence Paul R. Green 07: Monday at 2 at Chris C. Christonscn William F. Soafon 14% of 74 Tin; United Way campaign Chris C. ChrisU'iiseu, ofi William K. Si'atuii, of Friday, Illli Bowline; slrci't SW, diedRussell drive NK, died is 14 percent of the at Hallmark a A ionic, Ml. Vernon, following til. short illness, lie had been "f Campaign chairman C. i. liicc luiiLMiim! resident of lwnl m< that the drive should The Cellar Rapids ttaxrlte: I'rl., October 25, 1974 (Continued from Page 1.) pickets had thrown carpet tacks on the driveway leading into the parking ramp. Several other pickets were observed hitting cars with signs and blocking the entrance to the parking ramp. The persons who were arrest- ed during the struggle returned Rapids. Uvas married to Uonna K. "substantially complete" by yu lion, .lune I TO, at lljorring.jou Sept. 5, at "handful" a; Ocnmark, he was married '.'arrie lieiison March 3, 1908, al lioone. Prior to retirement, lie lie was employed for 12 years worked for the Chicago Link Western railroad for nearly lit) j .Speeder division, reliring in years. Mr. Christcnsen was a member of the National Assn. of Retired and Veteran Railway Employes, unit 29, Veterans Assn. of Chicago and North iVestern railway, and St. Mark's jiitheran church. Surviving arc four daughters; Stella Ilayncs, Colorado Springs, Mrs. Edward 'Jclvidere, III., Mrs. William lobstelter, Tipton, and Mrs. Leonard .Spieker, Cedar Rapids; wo sons, Cecil W., Cedar lapids, and Leslie II., Blue Grass, Iowa; 22 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Services; Chapel of Memories al 4 p.m. Monday by the Rev. David Larson of St. Mark's Lu- theran church. Burial: Cedar Memorial. Friends may call at Cedar Memorial funeral home after noon Saturday. The casket will be closed at Monday. (Continued from Page 1.) veins take over the function of the vein closed off by surgery. Trial fmpact Unclear It was the second hospilal- ization hero this month for Nixon, who was discharged Oct. 14, after 12 days of tests and an- ti-coagulant therapy. He was re- ported doing well after his re- turn to San Clcmente until Lun grcn found the oral drugs were not doing Ihe job. It was not immediately known what effect Nixon's hospital-j ization have on the Wa- tergate cover-up trial in Wash- ington. Lungrcn said after Nix- on's first hospital stay that it would he at least a month and possibly three months before lie could travel safely. Last week Herbert Miller, Nixon's chief counsel in Wash- ington, told Ihe court that Nixon would probably be healthy enough to testify at the trial within the next several weeks. Judge John Sirica lold Miller lo submit within three weeks a detailed report on Nixon's health. He added that the former President would be need- ed lo give testimony by late next month unless he was gravely ill. Mrs. Charles Fandrey Sylvia May Fandrey, 82, widow of Charles Fandrey, 623 I avenue NW, a Cedar Rapids resident 58 years, died Thursday following a brief illness. I'JIi'J. Prior to that he was cm- n major firms may not cach charge, police said. T i Commanders To Scene in-plant collections until November. i Kice reported the following! Lal'eters, Erger, and the shift tolals by unit: ,commander, Capt. Howard Unit one, Herald went, to the scene afler ployed by John Deere Co. unit two, Nelson reports of unruly ac- many years. unit three, Joe by the large gathering. Westminster Presbyterian church and its Happy Home- maker class; Crescent lodge, A.F. and A.M.; Iowa Consis- tory; High 12; Malta chapter, ICastern Star and the Linn County Men's Garden club, lie was a past monarch of Ambar Grotto and past president of the Linn County Rose Society. Surviving are his wife; his mother, Mrs. Simeon S. Seaton, Cedar Rapids, and three brothers, L e r o y Bradcnton, Fla., and Richard and Howell, both of Cedar Rapids. Services: Chapel of Memories at 2 p.m. Monday by the Rev. John P. Woods of Westminster Presbyterian church. Burial: Cedar Memorial. Masonic ser- vices will be conducted by Crcs cent lodge. Friends may call at Cedar Memorial funeral home after noon Saturday and at the chapel after 1 p.m. Monday. The family suggests that friends may, if they wish, donate to the St. Luke's auxiliary memorial gifts, Among the firms showing to the hotel, creases over last year's collec- Units of the Iowa highway pa- ion were: jlrol and the Linn sheriff's dc- Siehkc and Iloyt and cm-ipartmcnt assembled at the loycs, 250 percent of 1973 giv-1 lice station on stand-by alert, ng; Midwest Metal Products, A sixth person, Stephen L. 77 percent; Munson 21, of 4209 Benton and members of.street NR, was arrested at the HEW local 405, 12 percent; hotel when ha allegedly refused' icrcent; Executive Data She was born July 4, 1892, or the heart fund. Mew York, and was married loj Charles W. Fandrey April 19, 1917, in Marion. Surviving are two sons, Charles, jr., of Fremont, Calif., and Robert D., Cedar Rapids; two granddaughters and one great-granddaughter. Services: Turner chapel west at a.m. Monday by the. U.S. Sets Aside Recommendation On Hearing Aids WASHINGTON (AP) A rec- ommendation by a government task force that hearing aids be sold only on a doctor's prescrip- tion has been set aside. Lasl month, the group of ex- perts in the department of Health, Education and Welfare concluded that prescriptions would prevent hearing aids from being sold to persons they would not benefit. But olhcr HEW agencies, especially the National Insti- tutes of Health, convinced the Wayne Ryan. Burial: Cedar Memorial. Friends may call at Turner west. Memorial Services Gill, Carrie Hausman Turner chapel west at noon on Saturday by the Rev. Everett K. Burnham. Burial: Cedar Memorial cemetery. Friends may call at Turner chapel west. Cypra, Dr. Richard K. Turner chapel cast at p.m. Saturday by the- Rev. Allen S. Van Clcve and Cres- cent Lodge AF nnrj AM. Burial: Cedar Momorinl. may call at Turner cast. liridgcman, Marshall Turner chapel cast at 3 p.m. Saturday by Dr. LeRoy White. Bu rial: Linwood cemetery. Friends may call at Turner east until p.m. Saturday. The casket will not be opened after the service. Schwartz, Matthew Brosh chapel at a.m. Saturday by the Rev. Willinm Harnish. Burial: Englewood cemetery, Clinton, Mo. WASHINGTON (AP) Five Iowa Democratic congressional candidates and Democratic sen- atorial candidate John Culver have been criticized by the Na- lional Right to Work Committee for their "inscnsitivity to job discrimination resulting from compulsory unionism." Reed Larson, executive vice- president of tlie committee, said each of Ihe candidates has ei- ther refused lo take a stand on Ihe right to work issue "or lias task force that'traditional pro- UP wiln lte powerful ___i. I lintel nf Rirr I.nhnr aramst the Amber GenrRe II. Dilks.j scriptions would not work, said the task force's chairman. David Link. Ma lold newsmen Thursday Oct. 24 To the families ol, Hall. lhe forcc SUggesled. Daniel Michel, 1H41 f. avenue -it MO Ncvcnho- instead, that a group of hearing NW, a son; Charles stcimne.vcr. specialist, hearing aid dealers i nri. i-' i, i i- v fmiifrivf1. '_; 1180 Country Miirinn, a daughter; Kilwin l-.i- M'lslein, Tower Terrace, Mar- ion, ii son; Dennis Schumacher, E avenue NW, a son: Lar- ry Palo, a son; David rirapi-s, li-IH Eighteenth avenue SW. a daughter: David Miller, Fox Meadow drive SK: a son- .Icrrv Winters, G22 Si.s- i.viilh -ivenili' a son: valona Dave I. Marncr, 7-1. Sunday al Lower Peer Creek Mennonitc church. Visi- tation at Powell's after 7 Fri- day. ilccorah Carl (P.ud) jr.. 47. Monday a! Steine's, where friends may call becinim! Sunday. rirrnrall George If.. .lack- and consumers "investigate and develop specific proposals to control and improve the deli- The liisk force also withdrew ils earlier endorsement of a proposed Federal Trade Com- mission rule requiring a M-day SW. ;i .li'i-r linnlc 3, Mai-inn, Mi-Hume laughter. Marriage; Licenses "ISIeincV. Dcrorall Larson. !I4. Sal Trinily I.ulhi.r.i 'k! mar. Iversnn's. 'l-j l.'cirt Alkinsi i hearing aid ciislomer was dissa- Kr-ntilisfied. The panel decided dealers n chinch, al- incur some costs which if the bosses of Big Labor against the concept of voluntary unionism." Larson said the five congres- sional candidates are Edward Mczvinsky First district; Mi- chael lllouin, .Second; Slcphen Rapp, Third; Ncal Smith, Fourth, and Tom Ilarkin, Fifth. He said he is not endorsing Ihe opponents of thece can- didates, nor is lie telling any- body nol lo vole for them. Council Closes Doors On Bargaining Meeting The Cellar liapids city council had a lenglhy "strategy" meet- ing Friday with Cily Attorney unit four, Barry Bennett 10.320; unit five, Dr. James The p.m. shift of the police department was ordered Vlanville, and specialjto report for duty when as many 12 uniformed officers were on said ho did not know the man's identity.' Tin; strike by members of the Hotel, Restaurant and Bartend- ers union at the Koosevell began Aug. 1 following expira- tion of a three-year contracl. The union represents about 05 persons who bad been employed at the hotel. According lo the union's international represent- ative, Gene Schucllcr, main issues involved are wages, elim- ination of overtime on holidays worked and rearrangement of job classifications. Schucller said Friday that ne- gotiations "are at an impasse. There are no meetings sched- uled. There has been no prog- ress since the strike began. A spokesman for the hotel could nol be reached for com- ment. Allied Glass and employes, 123 and I an order lo leave the scene. Two Charges employes, 205 percent; Husco, Inc., and employes, 132 percent; I was chargcd_with in- Ahearn Plumbing, employes md members of Plumbers and ileamfillers local 125, 290 per- cent; and Ban-on Motor Supply and employes, percent A aps Mrs. Joseph Terpkosh Stella Terpkosh, IB, of 82 Nineteenth avenue SW, widow of Joseph Terpkosh, died Thurs- day afler a brief illness. A resi- dent of Cedar Rapids over 5( years, siie was born Aug. 22 1891, near Shueyvillc. Surviving arc four daughters Mrs. John Melsha and Mrs. Jo seph Mclichar, Cedar Rapids; Cleo Youngblut, Jesup, and Mr s. Frank Pobuda, Uvalde, Texas; two sons, Jo- seph, Swislicr; Richard, Cedar Rapids; 22 grandchildren and 42 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren. Services: Brosh chapel 11 a.m. Monday. Burial: Na- tional cemetery. Friends may call at the chapel Sunday. toxication and lounging and loafing. Police said he was ar- guing with an officer. Police said some members of Ithc crowd left aboul midnight. Some of the pickets remained the scene and wore present it a.m. when police arrest- ed a man on a Iraffic charge. Kevin F. Mackey, 20, rural one, Ely, was charged with disobeying a Iraffic signal. When police stopped Mackey's car in the 100 block of Second avenue SE, he allegedly began to fight wilii officer Doug Han- icl. A suit has been filed n connection with injuries suf- 'ercd by a 10-year-old Walford joy while on a Trampoline at Prairie high school April SO, 1973. The petition was filed in Linn district court by the boy's fa- ther, Lawrence lueGurk. The suit claims for the boy, Larry, for alleged per- manent disability of the Icfl knee and leg and pain and suf- fering. II contends the injury was caused when another sludent got onto Ihe Trampoline and caused Larry to fall off. It al- leges the school failed to pro- vide adequate supervision, say- ing the only supervision was from a teacher silling at some distance from Ihe incident. The father seeks of it for medical ex pcnses and for loss of companionship. BELLE PLA1NE Seven charges have been filed against a Belle Plaine man in the wake of a high speed chase early Friday. Donald Purk, 24, was being held in the Benton county jail at Peace Remark TULSA, Okla. (UPI) In a fiery speech Thursday night that marked his first strongly partisan attack on Gerald Ford. House Speaker Carl Albert lold a Democratic rally that the only war the Democrats 'elected to office (his year wanl lo start is the battle to ousl the Presi- dent from Ihe White House. Albert's impassioned remarks came in response lo Ford's statement two days before in Oklahoma City thai the election of a large number of Demo- crats this year could pose a threat lo world peace. His speech was remarkcdly different from his earlier calls for co- operation with the new adminis- tration. "I say itJu's In (lie Presi- Albert said, "that the President of the United Stales- had no business saying some- tiling like dial in Hie limes in which we Jive." Albert said some of Ford's recent comments have made' "Hc Pullcd llallds henind him "think maybe President m-v back and ''llshcd mc 20 Still Presenl Police said about 20 unruly pickets were present during Mackcy's arrest. They did not, however, interfere with officers. While Mackey was being taken to the police station, Rich- ard Sleggal, 20, rural route one Ely, allegedly tried to slop the squad car and interfere with the office rs. Mackey and Steggal were charged with resisting an of- ficer. With Husband Mrs. Hall told The Gazette she accompanied her husband a member of the Internationa' Assn. of Machinists, (o the hotel lo picket. She said she was arrested by 2 pbinclolhes effieer after she "laid" her sign on the hood of Johnson was right." Johnson was once quoted as saying Ford "played too much football without his helmet." "f understand the While House is backing down on that (coni- iient) now. They didn't mean the Democrats, they meant everybody that wasn't with the President on a particular pro- Albert .said. Albert also forecast a strong break with Ford over the econ- omy and speculated on what a Democratic congress would say- about the proposals. "They're going to advise the While House that there's not going lo be any 5 percent sur- tax imposed on the lower-middle income group and simultaneous- ly, as part of the great re- nowned economic program of Ihe President, give an 8-percent investment credit lo the busi- ness interests of the he said. "We're going to let them know in Ihe White House thai wo don't like inflation or reck- less spending, but we're not go- ing lo cure this Nixon-Ford re- againsl a squad she said. The violence, hhe said, took place after she was arrested. She said she and her husbanc were the first persons arrested. Robert Shelton, who said he works with Hall al Dearborn Brass Co. and is chairman ol [he machinists' bargaining unit, lold The Gazette the picketing was peaceful until the plain- clolhos officer arrested Mrs. Hall. "Didn't Know Him" "We didn't know who he was. He just grabbed her and shout ed 'Arrest Shcltflii said. "In my opinion, if Chief La- Peters had left the regular uni f o r m e d police there, we wouldn't have had any trouble." Shelton d-enicd seeing any tacks or nails on the driveway. No one beat on any cars, either he claimed. The pickets blocked the side- walk when cars tried to entei the hotel parking ramp, he said but they moved whenever police ordered the sidewalk cleared. Nol Firsl Time Shelton said Thursday eve (Continued from Page 1.) himself as the woman's hus- band interfered with the arrest, and at that time the other of- icers were "jumped" by pick- ets. One officer, Antone Imhoff, was knocked lo the ground and was being beaten, Steinbeck said, so Erger went to his aid and was struck twice in the face while trying lo pull pickets off the officer. Erger then struck a picket in the shoulder with his sap, Stein- beck said, adding, "He used what force he thought was nec- essary." After five persons were ar- rested Steinbeck continued, union representatives were told to leave some pickets at the hotel but send most of them tome, and all police officers vere pulled away from the area. Started Again "As soon as the police officers eft, they started pounding on cars Steinbeck said, and wlice went back to the site. By this lime, he said, pickets were circulating around the lotel and throwing rocks and other materials into the park- ade, denting several cars and smashing one windshield. "The five people arrested ear- lier were immediately bonded out, and they returned lo the area and caused more he said. The situation was complicated when guests and employes of the hotel began harassing pick- ets from the building's win- dows, Steinbeck said. "Thai didn't help he said. "They're Union Men Steinbeck said pickets were heard lo remark that the police officers wouldn't take any ac- tion because "they're union men just like us" and that "if they do anything, they'll be in a lot of trouble if they join a Oklahoma." cession with unemployment was the fourtl 'or f if Ih time since the hole workers struck that sympathj pickets have demonstrated. All previous picketing, includ- ing one evening when per Isons assembled, was peacefu and without any arrests, lit said. Shellon also claimed Iw coming collective bargaining Hay V. Harris, 59, 521 Ely ave- nue SW, was in serious condi- tion at SI. Luke's hospital with "I'll tell you, the feeling about joining a union really changed among some of the of- 'ieers afler that, deal." Slein- jeck said. Hc said lie expects more trou- ble Friday and Saturday. Alcohol Talking "It may just have been alco- hol he said, "bul some of the pickets told the officers they hadn't seen anything yet." The safely commissioner said additional 1 a w enforcement agencies will be alerted in the event of more trouble at Ihe Vnlon :tion at SI. Luke's hospital with! lie faces two speeding! in Junes suffered early Friday charges and one charge each eas, end of the Sixteenth av-1 reck ess driving, disobcymc a icnuo bridge. slop sign, failure lo yield lo an! Harris 'suffered fractures ;1 slop sign, emergency vehicle, criminal his ribs, left knee, left hip and H c said police will be equipped with helmets in the fu- ture, too. "We're not about to have any more officers injured, property njurcd, innocent bystanders in- jured or pickets he said. "We'll do what we can to prevent that." Illie (tf 0) The Go, anil nubllsneO onllv ond Sundnv ol 500 Third ovc. SE. Cedar RoDldl, Iowa 53406. Second class postage POld ol Cedar Raiilds. lowo. SubscrlDllon rotes bv carrier 95 cenls a. week, liv mall: Niant Edition ond Sunday 1375 o monlh, J39.00 o Year: Af- ternoon Kdltlons and Sunday J Issues S3 IS o monlh, SJO.OO a year. Olncr stoics dint n f, Irrrtlorles S6D.OO a veor. Ho Mall ..unscrlpttons ncceoleri In ari-os havlnu Gaiclle carrier strvlce. The Press Is entllled exclusively to Ihe me for rcpubllcatlon ot all the local news prlnled In this news- paper as well ai oil AP news dispatches. Irespass and possession of a right thumb when he apparently Ihe I.indii and I'Ycdcri f'l'i I liHU'il IT) lit''K v I r 111 i i it i ii.-tiui ijon'ald lit. Saiurday al 11, Che- aids were rcliirncd. wilh city employes. Smith anil iill, iimar.v .said. i The Hireling held ill exec-j Policeman Heii-'wi'sllnHiini on Ihe bridge at of C.dar j llopkinlmi n.rl land .1......... ulivc session. j (.lould said lie pui'Mied'a.m. i-'ridiiy. Marriages Dissolved SI i'.i''l.c''' C.'iilioiic! HI VIOAHS An old rev-l Mclinire recrully attended nmii driver Police said Harris was oliilioiiary and Ihe mayor of seminars on nl'f into ii couiilry lane linue-.l al Ihe lime of the ac- Ann -ind Michael Al-' church. Viilaliin afier II a.m. ohiliouarv and Ihe mayor of series of seminars on bargain-; country lane liuiuv! al Ihe lime of the ae- len L. and .latue-. Sunday. Devanrv's. were reported named lo iug and has done research amO'idenl. No charges were filed. Frank Allen. Audrey M. and I'.urial, Immaculate j as Maj .the new slate law permitting abandoned I'ue car in a corn; (JeraM F. IXiui'.heNy. n" Nguyen Khanh laid aside bargaining by public employes. Turn lhal unused piano into and Diiane the public Irappinits of power as The law goes into olTcel bul Purk relumed; bike, ear. or whatever you want Express Your Sorrow With Flowers from Flower 4 reasons shop 3028 Mt. Vornon Rd. 363-5885 Sfio's Spoclall tof her ITftKk Know with PERSON'S 181X1 f.t.I.IS HI.VD. Hovvcrpliuiu' .tlllMHZIi Alerl II. Hoc. liii.l premier. at I'lld We" I -t'k I-iilhcran church, service l.'nday al 11, IIMIII'.. i BROSH CHAPEL E. flnwcri for all (KTasinns let our flowers speak {or you FLORIST and GIFT SHOP 364-3139 v phone answered 24 1 hours every cloy j i Serving all faiths since 1888.   

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