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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 22, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 22, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Cloudy ,willi u chance of ruin I o n i u h I and Wednesday. 1, o s nighl 'III In '15. Highs Wednesday, (ill In 115. CITY RNAL CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA. TUESDAY. OCTOBER 22, 137-1 15 CENTS ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NKW YORK TIMES WASH I N'C TON Former Wliile House John Dean told the Watergate cover-up trial Tuesday former Attorney General Mil-': A defense source said Mon- cbell had indicated he had account of who proved the political a March 22, 1373, mect- CHICAGO (Ul'l) I'ohci jaraded employes tiirough lie detector tests Tuesday to try solve a weekend burglary at the "c I plan thai resulted in the Waler-jjnf, then-President Nixon's of- gate brcakin. jn the Executive Office Dean testified this was when building will be challenged. The Armored Express Corp., which he met on March 28. 1373 defendants plan to contend that may have netted nearly million grudcr, deputy director of I'J'cs- Authorilics said five persons, near the close of more than four days of by prosecu- cd Monday. Another 20 were un- dergoing tests Tuesday and Chi- cago police Sgt. John Castans Cross-Kxamination Defense lawyers, beginning It appears it could lie an Ivith .John Wilson, attorney for II. inside job. 53.8 Million? One investigator said thc loss WASHINGTON (AP) Rising prices for food, clothing and Office' mortgage rales pushed thc cost of living up anolhcr 1.2 percent in September, making the last played in court. This exchange as heard: Nixon: Ail right, fine, Chuck. Mitchell: Good lo see you. Nixon: How long were you in Florida'.' Just, Some of the defendants be- iw i- ,i .1 i- i i H. llaldcman, former White "f hc House staff chief, .were ready to at slay in The tape of that meeling in morc lhan 25 >'cars' tho James McCunc, 217 Fifth avenue SW, appeared to be creating quite a stir as lie raked leaves at El- lis park Monday. Actually, most of the leaves being stirred up by a tractor-mounted blower (not pic- tured) at the left of McCune. The blower is used to pile the leaves before being hauled away. McCune is employed by the parks department. (API A led-1 access -arilv blocked Ihe While House "K trial, from carrying out an agreement! (f :o give former President Nixon Walergalc criminal custody of his White papers and tapes. At the same lime Charles Hiclicy indicated h tackle the centuries-old question Df just who owns presidential health prohibits him from coming lo Washington to study the lapcs and docli- menls. Richey said in Monday's 8e order, copies may be made and sent lo him in California. Access to Courts papers the President or the; The upshot is that the niateri- govcrnmcnt. 'als slay in Washington but only Richcy said that although he'under limited access by court was ordering the Vi line House 10 order or subpoena, preserving hold onto the tapes and docu-'at least for the time being some mcnts of Nixon's Nixon's claim of executive the former President can' havo'privilege over them. to a federal repository in Cali- fornia under Nixon's custody as Rights Unit Denounces Racia! Busing Castans discounted earlier re- ports robbers set off two explo- sions in the area to divert police from Ihc heisl. "I think that was news media he said. "1 don't think we ever believed there was a tie-in with the other explosions." Authorities said llie robbery might have gone unnoticed had not lack of air in the vault snuffed the fire. The firebombs went off Mon- day morning, bill the fire burned itself out because of thc lack of air in the 15-by-20-foot vault, said Lt. Edward Neville of begin their cross-cxaminalion of Dean. Following Wilson will be Wil- ,'Jliam Hundley, Mitchell's law- yer. Dean testified that at the (Continued: Col. 4.) March 211 meeting lie turned to Mitchell and said. "John, I've' never asked you what happened All I've been able lo do was U.S. Will Get No Bargain on bomb and arson 13 bags ignit- I BOSTON (UPI) The the police squad. "Only two of th Neville said. "Without Air' "They jiisl couldn't burn with- out said another investiga- tor. "If they had, the robber) called for in an agreement re-j vealed by President Ford on Kacial same day hc announced he came cut against cmirl-jjnvesligalors would I pardoning Nixon. .ordered busing to was dcslroyei In Ihe meantime Nixon's schools, think ed in ycrs, in papers filed Had asked for a Icmporary re- straining order banning thcjneighborhoods. in the blacki White House from releasing any more of the Nixon materials ex- cept for those already under subpoena or which might be The CORK statement put Ihe group hi direct conflict with the NAACP. which filed Ihe class action .suil leading to the federal The loss was discovered aftci a smoke detector alarm sound- ed early Monday and firemen arrived at the scene. They founc the vault filled with smoke, but the fire had burned itself out. Several left-over bags contain- subpoenaed for criminal prose- C0llrt ordcl' lo slu' ing money were scorched, but cutions already under way. [dents. The NAACP has money was destroyed, police "cully supported Ihc order. "No Alternative" Marv Donmson. acting This would have banned the j White House from giving Nixon (o any of the federal Officials of Armored Express. a division of Purolator Security, tions. and Foreman lake atlequate sleps to prepare a defense for Ray. He said Ray's former allor- scholars ncys were guilty of a conflict of inleresl because of their righls rovalties from the works of Watergate matters, and one of ithe special prosecutors suggest- ed in court Monthly that the Nix- on motions might be a ploy in the offing to frustrate prosccu- "We feel that busing became the issue because no alternative lo achieve quality education was available." in; of the loss, estimated at between SI and million. "We know they got a good million, probably more j together ..he plan CITY ,AP, U.S. won't get bargains ini llei Mexican oil, President Ford lias] approved." This was a reference lo tr olitical intelligence plan. lorcigii Ho said Mitchell replied: [Summit. "Well John that's thai message from government reported Tuesday. Prices in September were re- ported 12.1 percent higher than a year earlier. This was thc worst 12-month increase since 1347. II o w e v o r. Ihc purchasing power of the average worker increased slightly for the first lime in three months. Real spendable earnings that, is weekly pay adjusted for infla- tion and taxes rose 0.1 per- cent in September but was still at the lowest level since De- cember, 1970. Price increases were spread across almost the enlire econ- omy last month. Foed led the way. posting its biggest rise since February. Consumer prices have already risen 9.7 percent so far this year. In 1373, prices rose 8.1! :.-lose. But we thought it wou! ld Mex xican President Luis Eche- be two or three limes moved." "Two or three limes removed from what'.'" Neal asked. "From Ihe (re-election) com- Dean responded. in a series of conferences both sides of Ihe border. 1 At his Mexican-American summit, Ford received a pledge of access to oil produced south of the border, but lold he to pay Arab prices for It is'expected to lake most, Ihc week for thc remaining tense lawyers lo finish cross-j Markul Price examining Dean. Irving to crack i At a hastily arranged joint i his crcdibilily as a witness. jncws conference with Echevcr- country his guesl say During slightly more than four al a Tubac, .lays' testimony as Ihe lead-offjclub, Ford heard prosecution witness. Dean. the oil expected lo flow from lying in the same flal, mattcr-jmajor fields recently discovered o'f-facl manner he exhibited be-jin Mexico: "We will sell it percent, the worst in any year since Ihc end of World war II. The labor department said last month's 1.2 percent in- crease, following a rise of 1.3 percent in August, pushed the government's consumer price index up to 151.9. That meant it cost 5151.90 lo buy a variety of goods and services that cost SlOO in the 19G7 base' period. Although most of Ihe news was bad, some prices declined in September, including such items as gasoline and fresh fruits and vegetables. fore the senate Watergate com-j whoever wants any of it at Ihc! over-all food prices went up mittec in June. 1373, made par-1 market price I lie world mar- 1.9 percent in Scp- i.icularly damaging assertions jkct." tcmber compared to a 1.4 pcr- about Milcbell, llaldeman and1 Echcverria's government (he previous Implicates Mardian 'indicated it would like lo join for I he Arab-dominalcd Organixa- Ile also linked Robert of Petroleum Exporting to the effort to limit Ihc investi- Countries. 'Hie U. S. is hopeful gallon of Ihe Watergate break- neighbor will not join the Kenneth Parkinson, be bard- (-'al'k'i "as played navuc with the economies of the rest of The prosecution supplemented tho world by quadrupling the Dean's leslimony with Ihe of oil in the last year. prcv non-food commodities increased 1 per- cent following an August rise of 1.5 percent while the cost of ser- vices rose 1.1 percent, the Mine as in August. ing of tapes of five presidential 1 "is Ford, told Average weekly gross earn- ings last were listed at (llc! SI59.I1, compared with a year ago. conversations and a e w s conference something of a telephone conversation presumably wasn'ti Over the past three months twecn former While House lo hear thai the United cial counsel Charles Colson and [Stales has "not seen any change Howard limit, one of the Wa- lergalc brcakin defendants. in the attitude of Mr. Castro" or the Cuban government and "it consumer prices increased at seasonally adjusted annual rate of 14.2 percent, up from the 10.0 percent rate in the second Counter Action "CORE calls for desegrcga-jmavbc ,ot _ _ lion tnrough community know how mllch j because Ihc most obnoxious fca- spokcs. A counter action by a group of j and journalists had I ation is not the tact that black and white theorized thai two MEMPHIS (AP) As Jamesiattorncy. Arthur Manes of Bir- Earl Bay looked on without niingharn. Ala., emotion, his attorney opened lnllc'cl lo Ihc battle Tuesday lo win his freedom with a declaration Ihal Hay was hounded and badgeredj into pleading guilty lo slaying j! Dr Martin Luther King ji worKs govcl.nmcm lo kccp lhc ls in black community. ..m.iof, Bernard Penslei wald ol IIuio_ als in ils cuslouv in Wash-i in ottl, is Washington. C.. told a abou, thc inglon until bniador which lhc al court hearing thai hay and! R.iy-s brief Jions are decided by thc courts. appearance before Mcliae oni Richey's order, which fol- ix-nnison s-iid she will request Monday. They presented a mo-lowed tour hours of oral ar-i.ln immediate end lo the busing Ttttltllfs Chuckle 'Man lo disallow a depositionjgumenls by five scls of w. Arlhur' gct.s raised Foreman who they morning, did a little "I June 21. The judge bv thc hook is probablv uas llie arcliitecl of the both sides asked but as school plea Ilia! led to a 99-year earlier not enough lo1 'make either exactly happy. scholars and journalists had ncxt lo cach: ,'e North Sde area asked Richey for a temporary 1. f restraining order directing the ,.Tbo control 'o divert police! The attack on Dean's lesli-jwas not expected that our alti-jquarler, the government said, mony is likely lo lake toward Cuba should (Continued: Page 7. Col. 2.) j one of his former attorneys. Percy Foreman of Hoi locked in a "fierce slru: over whether Ray should pead'fj.0'n guilty lo thc assassination Finally, Fensterwald said. Ray's resistance to the yielded and two days later, on.'. March 111. he admitted lo firing the rifle that killed King on April 4. Fenslerwald's s t a e m cut opened nn evidentiary hearing before 1.'. S. District Court Judge Robert Meltae on w'.icthiT Hay is entitled In withdraw the plea and stand trial for murdering King. Ray. -Hi, gained lhc righl I" the hearing Ibis .summer wliei (Continued: Page :i, Oil. 3.) oviets Warn f t'NITKI) NATIONS i.M'i The Soviet government warns Ihal mankind could he siib- jcclcd lo Mich i-nviniiinu-nlal arlificial tidal waves and ultraviolet bom- bardmenl through holes in the layer unless "weather Ihe S. .supreme courl (In-lined war" is headed olf. to interfere with a circuit court of appeals ruling thai his claims of a'coerced guily plea required judicial review. I'Vnslcrwahi said Ray had bce.il .1 victim of illi'gal In public officials in thai he had been denied the rijjhl of ciiunsel. his maii had been opened by aulhnritics and evidence that bore (in bis innocence had been withheld fioin him. said Ray'., lii.i! Soviet Ambassador Jacob Malik inlnidiiced a resoliilion in the 1'. N. General Assem- bly's main political comniiltre Monday In send a Soviet- again: t such lo flu1 Geneva Disarmaini'n! Connnitlee lo lie pul into final form Malik said .sncntisl.s had concluded Ihal weather war- riors could: Creale "win- in lln- oxonc laver nf Ihe upper atmosphere letting deadly u 11 r a violet rays through to "selected parts of our Sot off a micli-ar explosion inside Ihe Arclic or Antarctic ice cap, producing an iceslide Ihal would "cause tidal waves capable of wiping whole areas from the (ace of Ihc globe." Stimulation of tidal waves by d n in ping voluminous blocks of bedrock from Ihe ctintinciiial shelf into deeper parts of Ihr ocean." Creation of "armistic fields on Ihe sea and orean surtare to combal individual ships or whole lloldlas." "Cynics may say Ihal these arc all f.nicic.i from the s c i e n c e liclion of Jules Malik said. "Bui re- searchers reliably prove Ihal there is no guarantee again.--! possibilities hecnniing a reality detrimental to man." The proposed convention would forbid use of "me- leorological. geophysical or any olbcr scientific or tech- nological means of influencing the environment, including Ihe weathe military rainmakil said Ihe 1'. S. defense men! cslnnaled thai can ciiHid seeding over buio- t'hina boosted rainfall lit) per- cent above normal in some places, causing floods, land- slides and deslruciion of roads, dikes and bridges. He also noted that a Snvie-l- American agreement .signed July .'I al the lasl nev summil meeting in Mos- t cow called lor steps "tu over- come Ihe dangers of environ- menial modilicalion I c c h- niqucs for military purposes." Oilier sponsors of the resold- i lion are Poland, Hast Gcr- i many, llul- g a r i a Mongolia, Kenya. Syria. Iraq, Afghanislan and Barbados. The I'. S. did not join in the sponsorship, but llie t'. S. rep- resenlativc at liie cuiumillee session, .Sen. Symington, iD- Mo.l, called Malik's speech "a superb .statement." Bigger Break for Home Buyers WASHINGTON (API The government announced Monday hat home buyers will get a larger break than originally an- licipaled under new federal leg- islation providing low-interest Government officials had said last Friday, when President Ford signet! legislation ear- marking up to S7.75 billion for the home loan program, thai the effective rale would be pcr- ceiii. Hut iiir department of hoiiiinp; and urban development an- nounced Ihal recompu- tation of a cumpliralcd formula tied tu treasury'-, borrowing cost-, has llie initial loan Today's Index Presidents of thc U. S. cind F of Mexico r.trol! in Nogalcs, Mexico, Me   

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