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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 20, 1974 - Page 8

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 20, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                That's our Editorial Page Sunday, OtloUir 20. 1974 For congressman: Riley BETWEEN the two stale senators contesting for the Sec- ond district seat in congress being given up by Rep. John Culver, Tom Riley of Cedar Rap- ids receives The Gazette's en- dorsement for election over Michael Blouin of Dubuque. Hi- ley's background indicates he probably would do the better job. Though drastic differences between the two have come to light on very few important campaign issues, Riley has a legislative record that inspires higher confidence than Blouin's. There is every reason to believe the same skills and talents shown here would make him effective in Washington too. At the Iowa statehouse. Riley has earned a remarkable reputa- tion for spearheading tough leg- islation to passage for getting results. In the process he has also earned respect, grudgingly sometimes, from colleagues ir- ritated at the vigorous, aggres- sive, and sometimes abrasive, methods Riley uses in pursuing his goals. Philosophically, his orienta- tion has been progressive. He is keenly receptive to change where demonstrably needed. His ap- proach is energetic. His technique is keyed to thorough study, prep- aration and political know-how. Most of his thinking on issues is sound. He organizes well. His attitude on human needs is grounded in compassion. All these qualities would serve him well in congress, and serve East- ern Iowa thereby. In facing another aggressive campaigner who is not without his own abrasive habits, Riley heads for what is apt to be a close decision bearing several handicaps beyond his personal control. The main one is a party label of Republican when cir- cumstances of the Nixon period make that a minus to most can- didates on this fall's ballot for the GOP. Any voter claiming guidance by intelligence and fairness should keep this in mind concern- ing that intangible behind what happens on Nov. 5: Riley had no hand at all in Watergate, and has condemned it. He did not pardon Richard Nixon and shares none of the responsibility. He did not cre- ate inflation or contribute to deficiencies blamed on the While House for inflation's failure to decline, so far. The man, not the party, is what counts in most of what a congressman can do. Riley's legislative record has the mark of independence on it in addition to the qualities of leader- ship, which also stand out. Inde- pendent-minded voters would be well rewarded if they act on thai persuasion as to Second district congressman Nov. 5. People's forum Grain To the Editor Senator Hark was again expounding his proposals for a government grain reserve in a talk recently to Georgetown university undergraduates. His views are not shared by many of his constitu- ents in Iowa. We are not convinced that a federal grain reserve will help fight inflation. Here are three things to con- sider: 1. Have the taxpayers thought about where this grain reserve would be stored? Several years ago the govern- ment went out of the grain business and sold all its storage bins. Farmers bought them and are presently storing a greater amount of grain than the gov- ernment ever did at no cost to the taxpayer. So. at inflated prices the gov- ernment would need to purchase new storage. Servicing License Renewals Another View LINN COUNTY Recorder Pat Kane came up with a good suggestion when he appeared be- fore the joint house-senate committee on county government in Des Moines the other day. Why not. he proposed, enact legislation authorizing county recorders to issue driver's li- cense renewals? Kane pointed out that re- corders' offices now issue certain types of licenses, including those for snowmobiles. In many small counties driver's license examin- ers are available only a half-day or so a week while the recorders' offices are open five days a week 'Stay out if it, Coop' and are better able to serve the public. As we understand his pro- posal, the recorder would handle only renewal licenses. Examiners would continue to function and would have more time to give examinations to those applying for licenses the first time or whose renewals were rejected for one reason or another. The idea has merit. In fact, there is merit in any idea that will give better governmental service to the public which is surely paying through the nose for it. "We have an inflation problem, too. Think what prices will be when hove to pay the bills." By Russell Baker GO TO the movies. Gary Cooper is in the next seat as usual wearing his badge and stetson. I am sick and tired of him. He grins and offers popcorn. "What are we going to see he asks. 'The Sling.' I say. "and this lime stay out of it. Coop." "Shucks." says Cooper. "You know me." I know Gary Cooper all right. The previous week he embarrassed me at The unprincipled cop was just about to let John Huston get away with murder, on account of Huston's being a millionaire, when Coop threw his popcorn box on the floor, strode down the aisle and drew his six-shooter on Huston and the cop. "Get off the screen." the audience yelled, but Gary Cooper paid them no hood. "I'm lakin' you both down to Ihe S marshal's office." he slid "You can't do this." .lack Nicholson objected. "The whole point of this- pic- lure is that good guys never win." "You better get on your buckboard and gel out of town fast, son." Cooper told him. "before I lake you in for in- terfering with an arrest." Hoosegowed II was a long speech for C'ooper, so without another word he marched Huston and the cop off the screen and I lie movie ended with Nicholson heading for I-aramie. "I hear this is a real one." .says of "The ".lust stay out if it. Coop." 1 say Alti-r awhile he begins un- happily. "These fellows are nothing hut ,i bunch of crooks." he whispers. "They happen to be Hubert Hertford I'aiil I say. -'Even if v'arr crooks they're charming ami lovable, and ihe audience loves them, sn stay out of it." It is ton late. He is already striding down the aisle and up on the screen with Ihe drop of the whole roomful of swindlers even belore Newman can get away with the loot. "Get those hands up." he says. "We're all going to take a little walk down to the marshal's office." The audience boos as Cooper them all off into the sunset, manach-d aboard cayuscs. I am fearful that some- one will know Cooper was with me and heat me for being an accessory to the triumph of law. My analyst is no comfort. "You are merely hallucinating Cooper as an agent for fulfilling childish desire for heroes who are honest." he says. He suggests staying away from movies in which criminality and corruption prevail until I become less infantile. Sn I go to "Deep Cooper is there. After ten minutes he says. "Whew." "Stay out of it. Coop." 1 plead. Fu- tilely. of course "Miss Lovelace." says Cooper, tow- ering over her nil Ihe screen, "you need ;i Imle church training." He throws her over his shoulder, covers her with his badge and says. "I'm taking yon down to Ihe school- marm so she can introduce you to the Ladies Aid Society." The audience pelts the screen with comic books and dark glasses. Russell Baker My analyst loves this report. He asks me to commit myself for study at the Institulc of Incredible Sexual Repres- sions in Zurich. I run. To the movies, of course. But this time to "The Apprenticeship of Daddy Kravitz." which I know in advance is merely about an ambitious young man. Cooper is there, lie even likes ihe movie. "This is okay." he grins as Duddy goes into the business of making home movies of bar mitzvahs. But what is this'.' Duddy is behaving rudely to grownups. Yes very rudely. He is laugh- ing at them and ordering them off his land. Cooper is in Ihe aisle before 1 can stop him. "Stay out of it. Coop." It is useless, tp on Ihe screen Cooper has Diifldy under his right gun arm and he is "Young fellow. I'm taking you over to old .lodge Hardy's booklined den for a man-lo-man talk about good manners F.ncl of picture. Just in lime Quickly. 1 run to see "Going Places." figuring Cooper will he tied up giving Andy Hardy some quick-draw lips, but hi1 arrives in time to see the movie's two utterly charming heroes engage charmingly in burglary, kidnaping, car tlielt and casual thuggery "Those fel- lows are nothing but a pair of ornery .skunks." he says, striding down the aisle. "Stay out of it. The audience is enraged to see him rescue a lovely mother from ravish- menl. but Cooper lakes the charmers to the marshal's office anyhow Mv analyst says Gary Cooper is dead and I am loo immature to accept re.ili- Iv Cooper looks at the analvst without expression "I could lake him down to the marshal's office for lakmg inonev lor useless explanations." Cooper. 2. Sen. Clark claims the grain re- serve would make for greater price sta- bility because the government would buy grain when the price is too low and sell when Ihe price is too high. He conveniently forgets In mention that the market would know the reserve is there and the exact amount. This would have a great effect nil the price of grain. Yes. we would be right back at the stable low prices of several years ago. This congress cannot guarantee what a future elected congress will de- cide to do with grain reserves especially when so few coogressmen truly repre- sent Ihe interests of agriculture. Mr. and Mrs. Dale Strolher Route one. Ml. Ycriinn Whipping boy To the Editor: It sure is dicouraging to Iowa farm- ers to sec a U. S. senate candidate mak- ing agriculture a whipping boy for infla- tion. That big ad in your Sunday paper showing Dave Stanley behind a shop- ping cart, ready to "fight rising prices" can have only one meaning to the aver- age family. The farmers didn't ask for heavy rains, or drouth, or early frost, and many of them have suffered heavy loss- es this year from these natural disas- ters. When supply goes down, of course prices go up. But the farmers' costs skyrocket Ihe most, and he hasn't taken near the gain out of this that middlemen have. We need someone who understands Ihe real problems of our state and is ready to work on them, not a slogan- pusher who's looking lor scapegoats. Lennis Holm Winterset More attentive To the Editor: Now that our college-age children have gone off to their studies, we par- ents are left with the problem of how to pay for the ever increasing costs of higher education. 1 was pleased to hear John Culver call for an expansion of the federal student loan guarantee program. It is very difficult for those of us with mod- est incomes to manage the financing by ourselves. Culver's senate opponent. David Stanley, voted on the other hand to cut by 23 percent the grant aid requested by the Iowa higher education facilities commission for students wishing to at- tend Iowa's 29 private colleges and uni- versities. The stipends would have been each, which is still moderate in comparison to the average tax subsidy of per student for tuition at state schools. This problem of increasing higher education costs is going to be with us for some time, and John Culver has shown himself the more aware and at- tentive nf the twn candidates. Joseph Zagnoh Woodward Negative campaign To the Editor Congressional candidate Michael F'llouin continues In conduct a negative campaign and in doing sn shows dis- regard (or the truth. Consider his recent claim that Tom Hiley bottled up Bloom's bill on property lax rebel lor senior (Gazelle Oct. The truth Is Blouin s bill died in a senate ways and means subcommittee chaired by Democratic Senator Joan Orr nf Cirinnell. The two members were Democrat Bass Van (lilst and Repub- lican Forrest Sclnvengels. Tom Hiley was not a member of the subcommittee nor of the full ways and means com- mittee which had jurisdiction of the lull. Hlomn must think we voters are stupid No legisl.ilor has done more for senior in Iowa than Tom Hiley and most of us know thai. Some exam- ples are his amendment increasing property lax relief hcnofils for senior nhzcns bv 20 percent, nis bill creating the state commission nn the aging and his work with the Cedar Hapids city council to lower Ihe water rates for all low-income, most of them senior citi- zens. Howard Beall 1308 J avenue NE Qualified To the Editor: On Monday. Sept. 9, with no notice to the public, the Linn county treasurer closed that office from to Upon inquiry I was told that all Quandary employes, except one who stayed to answer the, telephone but couldn't ac- cept tax payments, attended the funeral of a former employe. Funeral arrange- ments were known on Saturday, yet no attempt was made to reach Ihe news media to inform the public that the of- fice would be closed. Between literati and wowsers By James J. Kilpatrick WASHINGTON The controversy sputters along in West Virginia over the selection nf "icxthoiiks for the public schools. The Knnawhii county superin- tendent has resigned, effective next Juno, and ii majority of Ilic local school board has said good riddance. There is nothing pretty In the whole affair. It is (if course, a pleasant experience to watch the super-liberals squirm. A (ew years ago the supes were whopping it up for community control of commun- ity schools in the black neighborhoods of New York. Black parents understanda- bly objected to elementary readers featuring the suburban adventures of li- ly-white Dick and lily-white Jane and their lily-white pooch Spot. The parents demanded that the offending books be removed and the supes were solemnly saying amen. A considerable intellectual agility is required to maintain the proposition that community censorship of textbooks is fine lor militant blacks in Manhattan but altogether abhorrent for militant whites in Appalachia. The proposition is untenable. II might as well be aban- doned. For the record, my own sympathies lie chiefly with the protesting parents, while or 'black, wherever they may be. With some conspicuous exceptions -notably the top notch readers pub- lished by the Open Court people text- books and teaching materials often range from the dreary to the dreadful. I know of one senior citizen who was inconvenienced by this inconsiderate ac- tion and others probably just accepted it as inevitable. Since this is a public office, no prof- its arc lost, but it is another example of elected public officials inconveniencing taxpayers. Then' is a candidate running for Linn county treasurer in the Nov. 5 gen- eral election who is different. 1 refer to (ienevieve Birchard, a religious Sister nf Mercy, who considers people as citi- zens In be served and not as helpless taxpayers. She is qualified by education and experience and is motivated to run an honest, efficient office. .lirn Sieglmg 144 Mango drive Hiawatha Unionism Tn the Editor: I noticed a number of errors in a recent letter criticizing Tom Riley (Forum. Oct. For example, the letter said Tom Riley spoke in support of voluntary un- ionism instead of compulsory unionism before a group. The im- plication being that he wouldn't have taken that position if labor representa- tives could hear him. How ridiculous: The fact is that the group was anyone in the Second congressional district with a TV set who was watching a debate between Riley and his opponent Michael Blouin on Channel 12. Another error was the statement that Blouin has always supported the agency shop (which doesn't require union membership but imposes a service fee) instead of the union shop (compulsory membership in a labor The fact is that Blouin, as a slate legislator, filed a bill to repeal the right to work law and bring about the union shop (HF It is Blouin who has been contradictory on voluntary union- ism. George L. McEowen 1148 Thirty-fourth street N'K Bullet-bite To the Editor I'erhaps President Ford's pleas for austerity would lie more convincing if lie were not so eager In provide golden bullets hir Kichiird Nixon. Robert W. N'cff 2324 Linden dnu> SE In West Virginia, parents complained that some of the leaching materials were subversive of order, discipline, and morality. If the excerpts they have sent me are fairly typical, their com- plaint has substance. Children were not meant to be barnyard geese, to be stuffed willy-nilly with whatever doc- trines the professionals may want to cram down their throats. Yet the other side of this controversy has merit also. A school system ought not to be at the mercy of the most igno- rant, most bigoted, and most narrow- minded 51 percent. When you come right down In it. there is no satisfactory choice between the literati and the wowsers. The wowsers arc often worse. II memory serves, it was the school board of rural Hanover county, .just out- side Richmond, that a few years ago banned "To Kill A Mockingbird." The flat-world yahoos who made that deci- sion deserved the contempt they brought on their heads. Elsewhere in this supposedly civilized republic, local ignnrami have banned the works of Faulkner, Hemingway and Salinger. A Midwestern school hoard banned art books containing certain paintings of Ti- tian and Renoir because the women, you know, well, they were nekkid. Closed Minds How do you reconcile this conflict'.' You never reconcile it. You acknowl- edge that ours is not a perfect world, and you do the best you can. If the professional educators of West Virginia had exercised even minimal tact and common sense, they would not have antagonized the Kanawha county parents with far-out teaching materials. If the Chicken Little parents had kept their heads, they might have recognized that there is a big world on beyond Putney, Rand, Pond Gap and Queen Shoals, and that one function of the pub- lic schools is In prepare their restless children to live in that world. The trouble is that minds get closed on both sides. Professional educators have sensitive noses; they arc offended by the intellectual B. 0. of the great unwashed. This ill-concealed disdain is maddening to parents whose honest sweat pays for the public schools. The situation is further complicated by the pervasive liberalism of most text- book publishing houses. Their editors are light-years removed from Kanawha county and they have no inclination In gel any closer. At the end of the line arc the children who, if they were consult- ed, probably would make wiser choices than the grownups, anyhow. Nobody asks them. In sigh I-s LETTERS The Gazette 't editorial page welcomes readers' opinions, subject to these guidelines: longlti I, mill 400 wrxdt. One letter per writer every 30 dayi. All rooy be condeoiod and None publiihed anonymouily. Writnr'i telephone number (not printed) ihoutd follow none, oddreii ond readable handwritten lignoture to help ourhtmticote. deal more with iuuei ond event! rHon per- lonoliHei, No poetry. No goblin, no tarry of Iho lirrfh hurtful powor o'or fruo virflintty John Milfon   

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