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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sunday, October 20, 1974 - Page 1

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 20, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                [IOWA Section Sonic, linprovemc.nls 1 Section A) What's DnhiKjuc (In Section B) Weather- Warmer today, night ii M (I tomorrow, high today in fios, low tonight in (oinomnv in 70s. iK-iff.ET.ss.raE'saa CITY FINAL 35 CENTS GKDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, OCTOHKK W, WASHINGTON (API -.Labor unions have contributed more than 52.8 million lo house and senate candidates this year and have an additional million to spend with the elections only three weeks off, a private re- search group reported Satur- day. The group called the total of Twenty-three se n a t e can- didates received more than with seven gelling more than according to the study by the Citizens' Research Foundation of Princeton, N.J. Senator iD- the lop recipient, re- ceived from labor unions in his losing bid against former astronaut John Glen in the Ohio primary. Glenn re- ceived from labor. Gave Heavily Organized labor also contrib- uted heavily lo the campaigns of Sen. Gravel who received Sen. Bayh (D- Ind.) and Democratic' Rep. Hoy. who received in his campaign against Repub- lican Sen. Dole of Kansas. Dole ant only SHOO from labor, ac- cording lo the report. In house races, 40 candidates received more than with the most going to four Demo- crats who earlier this year won in special elections in Republi- can-held districts. They were .1. Rob Trnxler of M i c h i g a n Thomas Luken of Ohio. Richard! VanderVcen of Michigan.! S2G.2GC; and John Burton ofj Calif., i The report said that of the! million already by labor this year, about percent, was given lo challenging candidates and the remaining 81) percent to incumbents. Demo- crats received most of the money. liiggest Republican WASHINGTON (API Vice-'lhem extensions because they even finished the iwho must pay more in audits. "Difficult Situation" gave in gills fo chari- table, educational and other! lllis is problem." he WASHINGTON (AP) Mass tax-exempt organizations fromisaid. "Now they have taken Iwoj starvation will occur through June of this'monlhs, they finished the audil the world if food production .and we made the settlement.; not intensified and population j Rockefeller made ihc diselo-j (Continued-Page 3, Col. 2.) patterns are not .changed, in a letter to Sen. Cannon', a house subcommittee. (D-Nev.i chairman of Ihe com-; "Unless present trends in pop-jmitlee on rules and adminislra-l ulation growth and lood produc-.'ion, and released by Ihe Rockc- lion arc signifieanlly altered, office here. food crisis that will have the po-j Rockefeller's largest gifts lentiai lo ah'eei everyone iroiiiiwore lor me lurtnerance ol thei D J. I every walk of life will hit arts, his chief non-poli-j KQllTQl" S more impact than the cnergyjlical inleresl and hobby, crisis of Ihc house Tnc disclosure of his charita- riculture subcom.millee on gifts uime a day after he parlment operations said in ,0 report released Saturday. More Disasters" can expect more, rather than fewer, disasters associated with it said. "The world food crisis will not disap- pear spontaneously or soon and additional in federal income and gift taxes, a figure likely to soar past Ihe mark when interest is included. Potentially Explosive News that Rockefeller would have lo pay more added a po- tentially explosive new note lo a TACOMA, Wash. (API William Slanley bad never really believed that a snake lived in his house. .The stories about an boa constrictor were just a joke, he thought. The landlord who rented the house to Stanley, on army demolitions expert, and his wife. Calhy. lold them Ihe maybe never." [growing controversy .surround- The subcommittee said short-ling me former New York govcr- agcs of land, water. vice-presidential nomina- and energy could aggravate thc'lion. food crisis, and warned that thoj U.S. could find itself in midst, of Ihc pn.blcm. "Americans cannot lo sit idly by thinking Ihat this j problem does not affect us report said. Observing Ihat the U.S.. f In New York, before Ihe an- nouncement of his charitable Rockefeller said guilty of any wrongdo- "I wrote Ihe Telcpliolo WATCH YOUR TOES President Ford raises his arms in response to a crowd which greeted him at .'an auditorium in Greenville, S.C., Saturday. The elephants are part of a SOP display. Ford Exhorts GOP Faithful in Swing Through Sou f> to (i percent of Ihc world's in, consumes 40 pci world's resources. Friday night Ihe myth was shattered. Stanley and his family rc- liut as President Ford made ai hnnlc aml- ;1S llc was campaign swing through South! -opo-ning door lo bis balh- Carolina Saturday, his room, the snake began coiling ary, Ron Nessen. issued a I ;lnlllllli hls House statement, saying! Slanley jumped back, shout- "i I 'still has complete faith in! ul a warning to his wife. Vice-president-designate Nelson! scooped up his daughlcr and ran from Ihe house, leaving Ihc snake behind. Mrs. Stan- lev screamed and followed her report said: "The demand for'.0 ls food, like Ihe demand for alld metals, minerals, and other re- This was a reference to the in- sourccs, is obviously going lo skyrocket, and Ihat rocket gift lax. going lo be fueled by fires of inflation imd joblessness." "Shock Waves" ''There' s nothing wrong, there's nothing illegal, there's nothing immoral, and there is no conflict of interest in anv- They were safe, but Stanley decided he didn't want the snake spending any more time in his house. He grabbed an ax from his front porch and went back inside despite pleas from his wife that he remain out- side. Stanley found the snake and "A poor harvest in any majorjluiug UOIIL- or conn.-! snuiig at it with I'ue blunt end [producing country the Rockefeller said as he left of Ihc ax. lie missed Ihe snake istalcs, Ihe Soviet Union, Indiajlhe hospital where his wife, bill punctured Ihe wall in sev- or China is sure lo send eco-iHappy. is recovering from! cral places, nomie shock waves, not only'breast cancer surgery. Slanley followed Ihe snake in- through Ihc food seclor of lhe: Rockefeller lold newsmen in; In Ihe kitchen and chopped olf I.OUISVILLK, Ky. (API -iof Sen. Cook and oilier mem- that he needs help in economy, but as il fuels'New York thai he had not want- its head. President Ford campaignedjbers of Kentucky's Republican Senator Sehweiker of vania was the biggest Kcpubh-. of can recipient with Figliling Spirit'' an recipient witn i can congressmen and exhorting! r would rather The AKL-CIO lists 47 In us most spin cdspeech of ;m engers on its priority list, but unfavorable lhc asked: What s leng, the report noted that only 12 received more than Organized labor has set as i1 (Continued: Col. 8.1 polls. After live speeches in North to plug for the re-election the matter with us? Have we ost that old fighting menting his anli-inflalioii pro-'lhe fires of inflation through its fd to publish gram. Some members ofjolher sectors as Ihe re-'before I hr congress, he said. ;grossion-' "would rather have a political! The report is tilled "Malthus economic referring to 'lhls ls: jlMh Century British ;lhml! ,Thomas Robert Malthus. out tins way, he said. From all across tim counlrvjdevised a (henry designed Same Message es of U.S. ae to Israelis CHICAGO (AP) Secretarylparlmcnt had no comment on of Slate Kissinger has promised; Ihc report. lhal. the US. will replace. The storv, dalelined Israel's oil losses il Israel gives Beirut, said'Israel now ls ;1 lfil Ford spoke disparagingly ofi hc js tin "our Democratic friends" and mcssage: "Let's do won blamed the Democralic-conlrol- led congress for a spending spree' that fueled inflation. i The President discarded mosli 'Massacre' Retrospect of his prepared lext al an porl rally lo warn against "a power-hungry" congress Ihat hc] said may be in prospect. Referring to Ihc polls. Ford! isaid, "All the experts say I WASHINGTON lUI'Ii f I can't change the outcome." Hut One vear after Ihe "Saturdav .I....1.......1 ..I, l.i I......... Night Massacre. Ihe two lo sup- ild be insufficient al (Continued: Page :i, Col. 4.) lax returns1 An hour later its headless audit but Ihc con- body was slill wriggling in committees invcs-; front of Ihe house. "I'm slill his nomination wanted' Slanley said. Slanley said an cx-GI who had previously lived in the house apparently had brought the boa from Vietnam and lost it in Ihe house, lie said he thought the snake had lived between an interior and ex- terior wall in Ihe kilchen. WASHINGTON (A1J) The Soviet Union will be allowed lo buy 2.2 million Ions of U. S. grain but will make no addi- tional purchases during the cur- rent crop year, Treasury Secrc- lary Simon announced Satur- day. The Soviels will be allowed to acquire one million tons of corn .and 1.2 million tons of vvhuil, Simon said. President Ford on Oct. 5 halt- ed a planned shipment of a total 3.2 million tons of U. S. grain, including 2.3 million tons of corn and tons of wheat. Midwest Weather The President acted in (he face of smaller U. S. harvests primarily brought on by ad- verse Midwest weather condi- tions in the form of spring floods, summer drouths and au- lumn freezes. Following the shipment, hall, Simon went lo Moscow on Oct. 12 to discuss His grain situation with Soviet leaders. Simon said Saturday the partial resumption U. S. grain sales resulted Irom those discussions. Simon's announcement said, "The Soviet Union also agreed lo make no further purchases in the U. S. market this crop year, which ends next summer. Fur- ther the Soviet Union agreed to work with the U. S. toward dev- elopment of a supply-demand data system for grains." Treasury officials said such a system would consist of an ex- change of information between Ihe U. S and Russia about prc- idieted crop harvests and anlici- paled grain demands. .Major Firms The grain sale aborted earlier (his month had been planned by Continental Grain Co. of New York and Cook industries, Inc. Memphis, Tcnn., bolh major exporting firms. Officials of both companies then were summoned to the While House for a weekend meeting wilh Ford. After the meeting, Agriculture Secretary announced that the pro- posed sale 'had been canceled. i At Ihc time, officials said the JFord administration wa.s con- jccrned that the planned ship- imenl might represent the first jslcp of a" massive. Russian pur- chase al a time when U. S. supplies were already low and retail prices for flour, beef and ill) the Sinai oilfields it in on Ihe oilfields for its the Iftli? Middle Kasl war. the industrial needs, acquiring mosl lh''. vnl Cox and F.lliol. Uiehardson. iwrmgmg my hands. say in hindsight they liail mis- judged Richard Nixon's reluc- tance lo release the While House tapes. "My original, premise was lhal his i Nixon's) most impor- tant objective was fo achieve some compromise that would resolve (lie issue of Ihe sub- poenaed tapes." Richardson, Ihe former attorney general, Chicago Daily News reported the rest ol its petroleum prod- Saturday, nets from Iran. The Abu Rli.ideis oil fields yield about MKi.'iOO barrels of "il ilailv worth >l million on the provide )i! '-on- wo'-lh ciirrcni market aboul hall of Israel's sumption. ilk1 rcporl- Hl. Tingmg my In urging your efforts in the 'next III Ford said "Ihe stakes are very, very high." In his prepared comments, hc Is of Kissinger's alleged agree- ment may have been verbal or written, ihc newspaper said, oiiling that it does tint jurged voters to send him lie- specify from where (he U.S. jiublican congressmen ''to guard would supply Iho oil. ,lhe public treasury from Ihe The Abu Khodeis oilfields II said Ihc fields, located on wm, managemcnl Ihc Gulf id just soulb (it Ihe largely-decimated city of Ihcrcfore are "a major faclor in (lie intensely corn- i deserl. c produces only butlgel-huslers." scries of slum] dclcarcd plicalcd peace negotiations." Khsingoi's secret promise was parl ol Ihc disengagement i I I 1 befoiv Ihe war, the lu's' ;ilsi1 in-in interview' ner s-iid lint "even'lhilt "arc gelling tl'i (I, (MHllIIJ-; I Mill n n 1- nf I (if Ml1 greater oil nches" are though, J "r" Gen. William Riickelshaus and Richardson said. "I came eventually lo Ihe con- clusion that il could not have been done. "I came lo that conclusion, really, only after several months when I decided ihe only way you could account for Hit' events of that week was on Ihe basis Ihat President h a d from the outset Ilia; what really wanted was to ,vi of Mr. Cox. "At any rale, he i Nixim i chose a strategy which in volvcd being forced back, step prccipilatei! a "lircslorm" of public protest which led di redly lo htiUM1 impeachment proceedings and evcnlually to Nixnn's (jix. mien icv.eil :tl bridge tinivei-ily S.'ixbe was sworn in last Jan- uary, lie then returned to the solicitor general's job. rcprc- Today's Index rr.int< I'olilKfll Notes Carolina, he flew lo the regional I'Jli.iMIO barrels of oil a day from ils olhtT oilfields, il said. Ki'vph.-ur. consider return lo tlicir control of Ihe Abu lihodeis area in upcoming ne- gotiation.', and sty il would pro- vide a hiilier ensuring operation of Ihe C.mal without as great ,i (car ol atlack from !el. (lie Morv y.i.id. mrport at (ireensboro when, he A door is whal Ihe iamtly dog is perpetually on Ihe wrong side ol. i lerviewcd by 1 versary of II1 cidcnt. Three i as to their lime, and explosive in-had no regrets at the fourth w as step, never yielding any more ground than he could prevent." 11 was the evening of (it1! 20. Ihat an thr i ra r 1 tl.iv puhhHv ahan OHIlt i s sci-rcl White 111 ing. the Rich. It'll   

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