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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Friday, October 18, 1974 - Page 9

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 18, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                10 The Cedar Rapids Gazelle: Krl., Oct. 18. 1971 Vice-Presidential-Designate Nelson Rockefeller and his wife, Happy, are shown attending a GOP dinner last month. Happy underwent a modified radical mastectomy Thursday after she discovered three lumps in her left breast which proved to be cancerous. The surgery differed from Betty Ford's in that Mrs. Rockefeller's chest muscles were left intact. Doctors said no evidence of cancer was found in her lymph nodes. Society Bishops' Vote Many Couples Fear Counselor Soys Women Must Wait By Alfonso Chardy OAXTEBEC, Mexico (AP) Bishops of Ihe Episcopal Church say (hey support the principle of ordaining female priests. A vole on Ihe issue stipulaled. however, that such ordinations must wait until Church law is changed. At their annual conference, the bishops rejected a bid to hold a special meeting next yoar on ordaining women but approved the subject for the agenda of Ihe next general convention. The Church's policy-making body, comprising laymen and clergy, next meets at Minne- apolis in 197ti. It would have to approve a change in Church law. It narrowly rejected a proposal last year for accept- ing women priests. Thursday's vote in the house of bishops was !I7 lo 35 with six abstentions. It reaf- firmed a position the bishops look al their last conference in 11172 to recommend ordaining women lo the general conven- tion. About of the Church's 2211 bishops attended this year's conference al this re- sort 411 miles south of Mexico City. Controversy on the issue was fueled in .July when four Episcopal bishops defied Church canon and ordained as priests 11 women deacons in Philadelphia. The ordinations were overruled in August. Former Pennsylvania Bishop Robert Dewitt, who look part in the Philadelphia ordinations, expressed "terri- ble disappointment" at Ihe outcome of Thursday's vote. lie said ill an interview Un- church was still "loo preoc- cupied with its own rules rather than with issues." However. Bishop .lose An- lonio Kamos of Cosla Rica, another of Hie Philadelphia ordination bishops, said Ihe church is "beginning to roc- o'.'iiixe the question." lie said he is pleased that the bishops affirmed their belief thai Momi'ii can be priests." During the debate. Bishop Stanley Atkins, of Fan Claire. Wis.. urged the bishops "not in make this great bread) in tradition only because the la- nics can't wait." He said that (ind presented Himself in the image of a male and hnst's apostles were men. lints priests must be male." But Bishop Kilmer Meyers n[ Sau Francisco, countered. I have concluded that the ordination of women will en- rich our Church with the lib- eration of humanity.' SOOTHING SOAK A baking soda foot-soak Aliens as it cleans. Use one al Ihe end of the day to ease away tensions and prespira- (inn odors. NOTE: Following is Ihe last in a series of three articles written in with this week's Family Project week activities. The including a series of programs to focus the attention on the family, is sponsored by a coordinated group of church people and people from various local service agencies. By Ken Torno Family Service Agency Many couples fear going to a marriage counselor. They believe Dial it's a sign that their marriage is failing and about to break up. Though this is a false stigma, it keeps many couples from seeking help. Marriage counseling is a preventive ed- ucational process that provides enrichment and growth for a couple. A marriage is to the family tin1 same as a foundation is to a build- ing. As a marriage becomes shaky the vibra- tion can be felt through the entire family. When silent periods become longer, when contradictions over child care become sharp and more frequent, or when one male spends an unusual amount of lime with work or hobbies, il may be time lo prevent a dissolu- tion of marriage. Prevention is given a high priority in the areas of physical health, juvenile delin- quency, anil eu-n in the c.irc of the r.iiuil) automobile and other properly. that is unique: therefore, a is difficult. During the first interview, most counselors will help Hie clients become comfortable by a iitieslionitig and listening process that finds out what problems caused them to come to Ihe agency and what they hope lo get from counseling. Counselors rare- ly give advice, but instead suggest and help to find new ways of solving old problems. Problem Is Communication Marital Maturity Couples who give the marital relationship comparable recognition by seeking help al the earliest signs of discord discover new awareness uf marital maturity. Reconcilia- tion is still possible, but more difficult, when such problems as verbal abuse, an extra marital affair, or separations have occurred. What happens in counseling'' Fverv counselor has a style of working Communication is often identified as a major family problem. Bui what does this mean? Some say. "If 1 have to tell my spouse what 1 desire, forget it. 11 real love exists, lie (or she) would know what I want." This is a ninth that causes ninny marital conflicts. It's very "all-knowing" for one mate to believe it is possible to know all the other mate's desires or displeasures. It is true, however, that il one lislcus and looks for the dues being given, many opportunities for giving consideration can be discovered. Maybe this is why we have two eyes and Iwo ears and only one mouth. It is as important lo communicate "what, how and when" you want as a receiver, as it is to be a giUT. Helping couples learn lo have fair fights rather than dirt> fights in p.ul uf tin- educa- tional process. This means that each male is asked to identify a "low blow." This is a statement or phrase that really hurls. Al least then, cad) mate would know one way how to avoid hurting the other. As a couple develops more effective ways of communicating their feelings, values and attitudes between themselves, they will also become belter teachers of family life educa- tion to their children. What does counseling cost'.' Most social agencies in Linn county charge a fee bused on a sliding scale according In gross income, number in the family and special circums- tances. Militant Housewife Starts Group BOCLDER. Colo. (CPU Ililma Skinner, mother of three, would rather bake ap- ple crisps than' burn her bra. She's a militant housewife and proud ill it. She is working to an anti-women's lib group in Colorado called Happiness of Womanhood "They uattl lo undermine Ihe family by te.idiiim housewives that Iliere is some- thing wrong will) you if you don'l get mil into the working world." she said ol women's libbers. Tile former part-time door- lo-duor cosmetic saleswoman says housewives are becoming disturbed with Ihe message. "They are like lionesses." she said. "Ynn disturb a lion- ess in her den and she will fight hack Housewives are being forced oul of Ihe home and they are going lo fighl to stay home where they be- long The Best Carpet Buys Are At Carpettand U.S.A. Mrs. Skinner said she isn't opposed to women working. She did object, however, to attempts to erase the image of the feminine girl and the motherly housewife. "They don'l want to show Ihe mother al home cleaning ami baking, but ue do." said Mrs, Skinner. "We don't want girls lo grow up with the that there is something wrong with staying home and doing those things." Mrs. Skinner said a working mother cannot do justice to both her job and Ihe task of being a mother. Skinner said one of her major efforts is opposition lo the Equal Rights Amendment LOSE FAT OR MONEY BACK Bridge West Side Club llowell movement winners in the game played Thursday al Welly-Way were Mrs. U. W. Valor and Mrs. Nate Fnnk. first, and Schroder and Nick Lillios. second. The next game will be played Sunday at al Welly-Way. Collins (lul, llowell movement winners of the duplicate game played Thursday al Collins were Tom Pearson and .lack Murphy, firsl. and Ray Beasoit and Cliff Hlllmgton, second. Looking for a house painter? ('heck today's classified ads. X it l.lllil-K X II iti'iliinni! I'l.ni rn S'l fir' X I n'. .IN, IIKllll'V ll'hlll'll'll hv H! Mill! l< I Inli I IliM' II ,i-h'l Ftcsb Fruit Buckets For Any Occasion. Gill cello wrapped I a Cheery Always Free Delivery lo [litter Hospital DALE'S FRUIT MARKET 3338 Ctntar Pt. Rd. NE 364-3314 A 7 Dayi Mrs. Rockefeller Prefers Quiet Family Life to Public Spotlight By Ann Bluckiimn WASHINGTON (Al'l Till' secrecy (hut surrounded Happy Rockefeller's breast cancer opoi ation is typical of tin1 woman. She likes IHT privacy. While appearing perfectly al home on a recepliun line or sipping champagne, Mrs. linckefeller is known In prefer the, intimacy nf a family life In the public spotlight. "The operation was a very close-kept secret in keeping with Mrs. Rockefeller's desire fur privacy." said the Kockefeller family spokesman, (leorge Taylor. Tempered Reacfion When President Ford asked A. Rockefeller last August In accept the vice- presidential nomination. Mrs. Rockefeller suid at the time. "As a concerned citizen. I'm thrilled." But observers suspected she might have felt differently. Margarelta Filler Murphy Rockefeller, known by her childhood nickname of is a healthy-looking, athletic wom- an of 48 who likes to ride, sail and play golf. When reporters tried to stay close to the Rockefellers this summer at their pictur- esque Seal Harbor. Maine, vacation spot, the cuuple ufteii escaped for hours al a time on one nf Ihe family's two sailboats. Mrs. Rockefeller was concerned him her husband's new job would affect their two young sons. Nelson, jr., 10. and Mark. 7. One afternoon last summer when Nelson, jr., was playing in a tennis lourmimcnt. his mother turned down an invitation to dinner at the White House to watch him play. "It's important fur her to keep the family together." said Washington hostess and close friend, .loan Uradcn. "During all this excite- ment, she wants to provide security for the kids. letting them know this won't change their whole life." Reportedly fearing kidnaping, she also has forbidden news photographers lo lake pic- tures of Ihe children. Mrs. Rockefeller was born June !l. 111211. in Hryn Mawr, PH.. to a prominent and wealthy Philadelphia family. She is descended from families whose members base played signifi- cant roles in founding many institutions in the country, including Princeton university. She graduated from the fashionable Shipley school for girls near the end of World war 11 and served as a volunteer hospital worker and driver for the American Women's Volunteer Service in Philadelphia. Four years later she married Dr. James Slater Murphy, who has a research job al the Rockefeller Institute. They had four children but were divorced after 14 years of marriage. Marries Rockefeller In May. she signed away custody of her four children and married Rockefeller, who had divorced his wife of HI years. Later. Mrs. Rockefeller lost a bitter custody baltle. won visitation rights lo her son and three daughters. Today with a First Lady in the White. House who was divorced and a President whose parents were divorced the issue may seem remote. But al the time, it was a tremendous scandal, and Mrs. Rockefeller was subject to much public abuse. "She's a warm, sensitive and unpreten- tious woman." said a close family friend. "But there's no doubt about it. She doesn't want to live in a fislibowl. And it she has to. my bet is she'll retain some privacy." Bream Proves Virtuosity By Les Zachies The' music of another age was heard for a solid hour Thursday evening in Handier auditorium in Iowa City, as Julian Bream, the world's leading performer on the lute, brought out this virtually ex- tinct instrument and exploited its possibilities. Bream lias al- most two dozen records to his credit on this interesting and intimate instrument. Renaissance For the first half of Ihe concert. Bream confined him- self to the lute and music of Ihe Renaissance, a time when the instrument knew great popularity. The sound was very soft and the audience hushed to catch every inflec- tion of Ihe music. High Point After intermission, Bream played the classical guitar. He quickly demonstrated his vir- tuosity on tills instrument with a stunning display of finger and fret work on the .1. S. Bach "Chacoune" from the Partita No. 2 in D minor. But the greatest applause was leseru-d for thf following number, a remarkable put- ponrri of aria and themes entitled "Le This was scored for guitar by Manrn Giuliani, an Italian guitar virtuoso and contempo- rary of Rossini. The complete- ly captivating work boasted variety from brisk martial London Post Office Appeals for Mail LONDON UTI) The post office appealed Friday for a hall to letters and parcels mailed in two of central London's busiest postal dis- tricts. It s'lid a backlog of two million pieces of mail had piled up in the two west central districts because nf an ban by sorters and fit her post office workers CALENDAR OF I'TN CLUt CKLKURATKS VKARS Calendar of Fun club members celebrated Ihe club's h anniversary Tues- day evening with a dinner al the Sirloin V Brew restaur- ant. Mrs. Melvin ('ooloy is president of the Marion club. melodies tu haunting and lyri- cal love songs. The high point of the even- ing was Bream's tender strok- ing oul of Lindoro's great ar- ia. "Languir per una be.Ha" from Ituliana in Algieri. The work was enthusiastically applauded by the Handier audience. The closing number. "Homeiiage pour le Tombcan de Debussy" (Homage for Ihe lumb of Debussy) by DoFalla. was a dark and moody num- ber. Bream played it with effective use of contrasting tones and occasional angry chord bursts. The man is a gifted and sensitive artist, equally at home on both the line and guitar. ORAL DISEASES Oral diseases are as old as man. Evidence of decay of the teeth and periodontal disease lias been found in the most an- cient nf human skulls. Tour of Homes Sef in Wellman The first annual lour of homes In Wellman, sponsored by the Business Woman's dub. will be Sunday from 1 to 5. Proceeds from the tour will be used for a community project. Homes included in the lour are those of: (lunther Chris- tiansen, 415 Sixth avenue; Stanley Fash. Circle drive; Harry Wenger. 14111 Hilltop court, and Mrs. Oclmar Yod- er. Fairview drive in the Ma- plowood Park addition. Also open for tour will be the re- cent addition lo the Shenk nursing home. Tickets are and may be purchased al the Town anil Country (lift shop, the Sowing Center and Lewis' department store or al any of the homes the day of the tour. ON THIS DATE in 15411. the Spanish explorer, Hernando de Solo, was fighting Indians in southern Alabama. Evening Ensemble A model shows an Emilio Pucci evening ensemble including a black silk jersey skirt and print silk twill blouse in pink and brown. Spring and summer fash- ions were shown in Florence, Italy, this week. r By Abigail Van lluren OEAK AliHY: 1 am being married soon. My fiance's favorite brother, who was asked to be our best man, has just undergone Ills third op- eration. He will be out of the hospital in lime for our wed- ding, hul he'll be in a wheelchair for several months. My fiance insists that his brother be In the wedding parly, wheelchair or no wheelchair. Abby. there will be over 51111 people at Ihe wedding and reception. I'm having a pro- fessional photographer lake pictures of the whole thing, even movies, and I just know that wheelchair will ruin ev- erything. Imagine, the best man going down the aisle in a wheelchair! I'm afraid people will laugh. Please don'l get me wrong, Abby. I love my future brother-in-law and am sorry for what he's had to go through, but 1 think someone else should take his place as best man. Am I wrong for wanting everything to be perfect? PHOENIX BR1DK DKAR BR1DK: If by "pcr- fi'i'l" you mean appcaranees over Ihe feelings of yoar fian- ce and his favorite brother, you are indeed wrong. A best man in a wheelchair (or not, for that matter, any member of (he wedding in a wheelchair) is not unique in Ihe annals of wedding ceremo- nies. And it's not apt lo be laughed at. DEAR ABBY: I'm a III- year-old girl. I'm writing this for my brother (he's 1'2) and myself because we both have the same problem. It's our father. He refuses to lake a vaca- tion. Dad says he can't spare the time. He's in the insur- ance business and he makes a good living, but what good is the money if he works himself lo death? Mom is a housewife. We live in a nice home in Ihe suburbs, have two cars, nice clothes and my brother and 1 go to a good camp in the summers. Mom and Dad haven't hail a vacation together since they've been married. Other families lake a vacation every year. All our Dad knows is work. Is (here some way we can get him lo lake a vaca- tion? MILWAUKEE KIDS DKAIt KIDS: You might tell Dad that heeause you love him you want him to live a long lime, so he'd better lake eare of his health. Being in Ihe insurance business he knows that all work and no play may make a lot of jack, hul it also makes Jack a poor insurance risk. Everyone has a problem. What's yours? For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, tos Angeles, Calif. 90069. love is... not bitting to her btiikhiiml too Do someone a f Recommend Vern Jackson The Quiet Realtors that Everybody Is Talking About KREBS Flower Shop 2424 18Hi Stroet SW 363-2081   

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