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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, October 15, 1974 - Page 5

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 15, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Bilingual Interns Teach W. Liberty Chicanitos By M. Jounne Krucggr WKST 1JUKUTY man In a scrape directs pint- traffic in a lunchroom whore tacos are on (he school menu. The man has a special help some of the little ones commu- nicate. Children's names on a classroom blackboard include American traditional like "Emily" written alongside Mingled with the usual corridor chatter is the soft sound of Spanish brought by the Cliicanitos In West Liberty schools. The Chicanilos are Spanish- speaking children of Mexican or Mexican American descent. There were few here ten years ago. Now Mexican- Americans make up 12 to 15 percent of the town's res- idents, according to one esti- mate. Most are permanent residents. Speak No, English There are about 75 students in' West Liberty schools this year who speak little or no English. All but a dozen are in the lower elementary grades- kindergarten through grade three. Through a new project at the University of Iowa college of education, Spanish-speak- ing student of them Mexican Americans been put into class- rooms at West Liberty, Daven- port, Muscatine and Columbus Junction, communities with high Mexican populations. The program, called the Teacher Corps, is designed to increase the number of certi- fied bilingual teachers. There are 19 interns in the corps as- signed to learns In the four communities. Over a 15-month period, they observe in (he classroom, attend regular college classes and will eventually enter prac- tice teaching. They will gradu- ate with degrees in elementa- ry education with special certification as bilingual teachers. Most Challenging Debbie Caldwell, who has been West Liberty's bilingual teacher for two years and is a corps team leader, says the interns look forward to their rotation to West Liberty. She said it is considered the most challenging of the four participating school districts because of its high proportion, of children who don't speak English. For four years, West Lib- erty's bilingual teacher has been able only to work with small groups of Mexican- American children, for per- haps 30 minutes at a time, teaching them English as their second language. The remainder of the day was spent in regular classrooms, listening to their teachers and other students discuss lessons in English. Under the new program, classes are conducted in Eng- lish, but the intern is availa- ble to translate instructions for worksheets and occasional- ly read a story in Spanish. Clark Calls for Plan To End Food Shortages WASHINGTON The American housewife will continue to find food cosls high as long as there is wide- spread hunger around the globe, Sen. Dick Clark said recently in calling for estab- lishment of a grain reserve. "We will probably not be able lo curtail the rising price of food in this country as long as there is a world food the Iowa Democrat told Georgetown university undergraduates. "Thus a necessary weapon in the fight against inflation is a viable plan to eliminate this shortage. This plan must include a grain reserve." Positive Program Clark said he hopes that at next month's world food con- ference in Rome the United States "will present a positive program to provide food aid to those countries who need it, to develop a program for in- creased worldwide food pro- duction and a proposal for an international grain reserve. he said, "I am not very optimistic about this." Agriculture Secretary Earl our chief delegate to Ihe conference, has given no in- dication we have any such plan forthcoming, Clark said. "He has been too busy explaining why this year's corn crop in the United States will be less than three-fourths of what he predieled a few months ago and explaining why everything will work out if the government will just go away and let free enterprise and supply and demand take care of the world food prob- lem." Very Encouraged The lowan said he was "very encouraged" by Pres- ident Ford's declaration of support for an international grain reserve, but, lie added, he is "continually discour- aged" by opposition to any government-held re- serves. "We should act at once lo establish a Brain reserve, lo ensure an adequate food sup- ply and to prevent sharp fluctuations in food prices thai have plagued us Clark said. The chief objection, he said, to a grain reserve is Ihe fear it will hurt farmers by keep- ing grain prlc-os artificially low. "In the he conceded, "government-held supplies have been used to depress prices, but the current grain reserve proposals provide new protection for the farmer. They insure that grain can be sold from the reserve only when there is a shortage and only at a price that provides the farmer a profil." A grain reserve would make for grealer price slability, he said, because (ho government would buy grain when the price is loo low and sell from Ihe reserve when Ihe price is loo high. Clark, a member of Ihe senate agriculture committee, will attend the conference as a congressional adviser. DRIVE SAFELY The emphasis is on the lower elementary grades, Miss Caldwell said, bccauau-lt is Important to build a founda- tion on which Ihe children might continue -their educa- tion. She said Chicano children In American schools often drop out early in high school, parlly because of their lack of a working English vo- cabulary. Kindergarten students are the most challenging lo work with, Miss Caldwell said, because they have had no exposure lo cither English or school. The youngsters tend to be very shy at this level, said school principal Lewis Morri- son, and a prime funelion of a bilingual leacher is to help them build confidence. The children's self-esteem has risen markedly with the arrival this fall of (he interns, Miss Caldwell said. "You can just see their faces light up when they hear one of them (interns) speak- ing Spanish." Parents also respond to efforts made lo help their children, Miss Caldwell add- ed, noting the corps stresses community involvement. The exchange of cultural awareness which the interns hope to foster in the communi- ty center has already begun at the school. Tacos were added lo Ihe school lunch menu, Mexican Independence day was marked, as will be the Feast of the Virgin of Guadalupe. Financing Plan to Be Discussed by ISEA DES MOINES Tours, seminars, and an antic- ipated school financing pro- posal wait teachers, who attend the 120th Iowa State Education Assn. (ISEA) convention Thursday and Friday here. ISEA President Walter Galvin is expected Thursday night lo outline Ihe finance plan being readied for presen- tation to the next Iowa legis- lature. U.S. senate candidates John Culver and David Stanley will debate on Friday morning. Gov. Robert Ray and National Education Assn. President Jim Harris are lo speak Ihe same morning. ISEA officials number 000 educators among their members. The Cedar Rapids Gazette; Tues., Oct. 15, Committee of 11 Seen For Iowa City Program Jose Reynaga, an intern in the University of Iowa's new Teacher Corps program, leafs through a book with Juan Quiros, 8, son of Mr. and Mrs. Juan Quiros, West Liberty. The boy is one of about 75 Spanish -speaking students in West Liberty schools who are being aided in their education by the interns. The program is also being used in Davenport, Muscatine and Columbus Junction. Sfafe Accused of "Burying" Six Motions in Fitz Murder Case WATERLOO (UPI) The attorney for accused murderer Russell Monday charged Black Hawk County Attorney David Dutton of "suppress- ing" six motions filed in the case as public records. Robert Mahan, a Waterloo lawyer, accused Dutlon of ordering a court employe to "bury" six motions filed last week on behalf of Fitz who is accused of the slaying of Shelley Day, 2, last June. Mahan said he and oilier court-appoinled attorney filed six motions on the case last Thursday in the Black RSVP Event At Garrison Oct. 24 GARRISON A Retired Senior Volunteer Program recognition ceremony is scheduled for Oct. 24 at 2 p.m. in..The Old Creamery Theater in Garrison. The public is invited To attend. The program will begin with a performance by The Old Creamery Theater Co., "The Mime an original col- lage of pantomime sketches. Following the show will be a recognition of RSVP volunteers and social hour. The Relired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) is a part of ACTION, the agency for older American Volunteer Pro- grams including VISTA, Peace Corps, SCORE and Foster Grandparents. The local sponsor is the Four County Benevolent Non Profit Corp., Belle Plaine. The local director is Donna Ford, Belle Plaine. Over 130 older adults enrolled in RSVP donate approxi- mately hours each month in volunteer service in the Benton, Iowa, Powcshiek and Tama counties. Hawk county district court clerk's office here. Mahan added that when no Waterloo news media reported the motions being filed, he asked an employe of the clerk's office why no reporters had seen the documents. "She told me Dutton was upset with the motions and had told her to 'bury Mahan said. "I feel public records were suppressed by the county attorney." Dutton, who said he didn't want to make public state- ments on the charges by Mahan, replied he told (he employe in the clerk's office to "hold the motion" [or Judge Joseph Kcefe of De- corah who was to hear the arguments Monday. 27, accused of the strangulation death of the Day child, is slated to go on trial Monday in Fort Dodge. Judge Kcefe Monday denied all but one of Mahan's mot- ions which soughl lo have Ihe case dismissed, Ihe trial de- layed until Nov. 18, and Ihe names of additional prosecu- tion witnesses made available to the defense IOWA CITY The Iowa Ci- ly council took a major step Monday toward creation of a steering committee to gather citizen input on how the city should spend approximately In federal funds. The council decided the committee should consist of 11 persons from low and middle income groups. Nominations for the com- mittee should be submitted to the city clerk before the council meeting Oct. 22. Mayor Edgar sug- gested a persons suppori'.ng a family on less than a year would probably be con- sidered qualified to serve on the committee. The housing and community Child Guidance Session in Sigourney Mo- rain, estension specialist in human development at. Iowa State univcsity will conduct a session on child guidance Oct. 24 at p.m. at the Keokuk county extension office in Sigourney. She will discuss readiness for school, sex ed- ucation, and guidance or dis- cipline. All parents are invited to attend. development act, under which Ihe city will receive funds, defines low income as persons making less than 80 percent of the median income of (heir community. To receive the the council must file an applica- tion with the federal govern- ment by April 15. The city must have a municipal plan with low and middle income input approved by the Johnson county regional planning commission. Johnson Eligibility For Aid Is Cited DBS MOINES Johnson county is eligible for in disaster assistance from the federal government in accord- ance wilh the federal-stale disaster assistance agree- ment. State Auditor Lloyd Smith, who announced the eligibility said the federal government requires the auditor to audit disbursements for disaster as- sistance and verify that the expenditures are wilhin the approved work categories es- tablished by the Federal-State Funds are not distributed until the audilion is satisfied all federal requirements have been met. lay AT THE NEW CENTER FOR TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION 4245 1st AVE. SE: "Doctors Court" WEDNESDAY, OCT. pm Refreshments Free LECTURE: "TM AND THE PROGRESS OF CEDAR RAPIDS" Learn of the potential ap- plications of TM to business, governments, and rehabilitation in Cedar Rapids. ALSO: PUBLIC INFORfnATORY LECTURE THURS. OCT. 17, p.m. Tuckar Realty, 613 2nd Ave. SE "TM: WE BASIS OF M.I.U." paid for by Cadar Rapldt aroa meditators. '-for :'fhie: Finest More Security FALSETEETH At Any Timo Afrniil filllWl Wi" rtirnm A uciiiiin1 mi TO TUCKER? BUDDY LEVAUGHN TUCKER FOR INFORMATION WRITE: BUDDY TUCKER P.O. BOX 200 k DES MOINES, IOWA 50301 Above, Rick Poldberg at work in his studio. Above right, your choice free when you open a new account of Right, your choice free for saving When you open a new account of or add or more to an existing account at Merchants National Bank, you'll receive a free original metal sculpture by Rick Poldberg, one of the midwest's leading young artists. Different selections are available, JcpmiJing un ii'ie amount you save. These charming, whimsical pieces are perfect for home or office. To get yours stop by any MNB office and open a savings account or add to your present account. Offer while supply lasts, so hurry. Om1 per family. Mont'y on tor 6 months or longer. Merchants National Bank A HANKS Or IOWA BANK M.lin H.mk Moloi ll.mk VVrimn Otlur (Itlicc Am.m.l Olliic   

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