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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 10, 1974 - Page 3

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 10, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                DEATHS Rain is "forecast Thursday night in the northern Plains in southern Florida. Clear to partly cloudy elsewhere. and the La The Weather Inflation Rate In Industrialized Countries iPoland Hopes To iSpend Billion U.S. Goods Joo C. Bolt Joe C. Holt, (ill, of 3701 Six- leenth avenue SW, died Wednes- day afternoon following a long) Communist I'arty leader illness. Morn Sept. 15, I'JOii, in Ham- >f Cedar Kapids since 1919. lie was an employe of Northwes- tern Dell Telephone Co. for 39 years before he retired in lie was married to the former Alierlon. lie was a member of Sharon United Methodist church the Telephone Pioneers club. Surviving in addition lo bis wife are two sons, Ronald and David, both of Cedar Rapids and one granddaughter. Services: Turner chapel west at 3 p.m. Friday, by the Rev. Everett K. liurnham of Sharon United Methodist church. Burial: Cedar Memorial ceme- tery. Friends may call at Turner west until p.m. Fri- day. The casket will not be open after the service. Friends may, if they wish, contribute to the memorial fund of Sharon United Methodist church. (Continued from Page 1.) mi across-the-board surtax "is not a just way lo raise funds." Kurd also said at Ills news conference: He liclicvcs a one-year surtax of American industrial products sufficient, instead of a i ward Gicrck says his country tile next few years. I two-year tax suggested by Rep I'he Cedar Kapicls Gim'Uc: Tliurs.. October 10, 1U7-I "Wi> are interested in veryj Ullman acting head of serious purchases of capital j the ways and means committee goods from the American mar- There lias been "nothing to (lierek told a National change" his inclination to run Press Cluh luncheon Wednes-jfor presidency in 1976. day. "Our program for the next few years entails the purchase of complete industrial plants, technological lines, licenses and He will meet Get. 21 wll'.i Mexican President Luis Echcv- crria in Nogales, Mexico, his first trip outside the continental U. ,S. since becoming President. equipment to the tune of nearly ,hink thorc was 5 hdhon he added. u h jn m b Later in the day, he and Prcs- ident Ford signed two joint statements on cooperation be-1 tween the two countries. Ford said the first statement on prin- nything improper Nelson Rockefeller individuals. He would meet with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev prior to a scheduled summil meeting C.R. Student's Art Entry in UNICEFShow A piece of artwork by a St. Ludmilu's sixth grade student will be included in a special exhibition 200 pieces of uii by children in Chicago. The abstract drawing by Hulh Skvor, 1117 Nineteenth avenue SW, will be on exhibit in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry from Nov. 5 through Jan. 5. Her entry, a red heart con- taining a profile of people shaking hands, was selected from entries. The contest was sponsored by Parade magazine and the (Continued from Page 1.) >opular decision of the executive iranch to fulfill its legal obliga- ion." U. S. District Judge W. Arthur 'iarrily, in turning down the for federal aid, told White to seek aid from local law enforcement agencies. "The problems here are no different from those which have been solved in 200 other cities, and they arc going to be solved here. It is just a question of how long, and how much heartache, it will said Garrity, who had issued the busing order. In Washington, Ford lold a news conference that, although lo several j U.S. Committee for UNICEF to promote understanding of the world's peoples. he personally disagreed witl it should he Ciples Of U. S.-Polish relations11 sunnna uteuuuB our nexl lf lhcre ls nced for an High temperatures Wednesday temperatures overnight precipitation: night and inches ot Anchorage 37 38 L Angeles 73 58 Atlanta ...7547 Miami ....87731.10 Bismarck ..79 36 Min'apolis 6346 Chicago '...5646 N. Orleans 8054 Denver ...8J 46 New York 63 5] Sulutn .....61 47 Phoenix ..93 71 onolulu ...M MM Seattle 51 Houston Be 70 Wash'gton 48 46 M-Missing. Extended Forecast Partly cloudy and colder Saturday. Mostly fair Sunday and Mon- day. Lows in the 20s and 30s. Highs in the upper 40s and low 50s Saturday to upper 50s and low 60s Sunday and Monday. C. R. High Wednesday .............GG ..........45 ..........G5 ..........G9 .......None ........0.2G Low overnight Noon Thursday 2 p.m. Thursday Precipitation Total for October Normal for October ........2.2G Normal through October ..29.39 Total for 1974 ..............40.23 Barometer, falling Humidity at neon 30.1G 55% Magistrate's Court Speeding: Dwight Hcitman, Marcngo; fined and costs. Scott Kaccre, 1G58 Thirty- second street NE; fined and costs. Patrick Benesh, Walker; Carlin Blake, 3035 Sixteenth avenue, Marion; Davie Clemen, 1603 Washington avenue SE; Jeffrey Frankel, 1621 A avenue NE; Charlotte Johnson, 3107 Johnson avennc NW; Robert Whitters, 2100 O avenue NW; Michael Serbouselc, 1001 Orrian drive SE; Deborah Knight, 1501 A avenue NE; Allan Knowles, BOO G avenue NW; Steven Thurslon, 2112 Twenty-ninth street SW: Donald Richards, route one, Cedar Rapids; Ti- mothy Boyle, 2GO Twenty- seventh Novak, avenue SW; 2320 Mallory Steve street Clarence F. Curtis Clarence Fancher Curtis, 71, PARIS (API Sixlh aVCnUC SW' died prices in the non-Communist in- Wednesday after a short illness. Wind direction and velocity at 2 p.m. S at 17 mph. Sun rises Friday, sun sets, Year Ago Today High, 72; low, 05; rainfall, O.G1. Traveler's Forecast Friday Weather, Tli-Lo Bismarck Chicago...... Cincinnati Cleveland DCS Moines Detroit Indianapolis Kansas City Mpls.-St. Paul Omaha St. Louis Sioux Falls .....Fair 78-58 .Fair 72-57 Cloudy 73-46 ..PtCldy 73-51 Fair 75-57 .PtCldy 83-55 ..PICIdy 73-50 .PICIdy 71-45 .PtCldy 75-38 ...PtClcly 82-54 ..PtCldy 73-40 SW; each fined and costs. James Williams, Walker; Ste- ven Eincs, Western drive SW; Donald Jacobscn, Hia- watha; Barbara McCool, 700 Thirty-fifth street, Marion; Jesus Saldivar. 367 Seventh avenue SW; Robert Zamastil, 13GO Hillside drive NW; Mark Norton. 2135 North Townc lane NE; each fined 520 and costs. Attempting to elude police Kenneth Hcpkcr, fiOti Second avenue SW; fined and costs. Reckless driving Kenneth Hcpkcr, GOG Second avenue SW; lined and costs. Driver's license violation Gary Schulzc, 370 Seventeenth street SE; fined and costs. Gene Bemcr, 1409 Fourth avc- iliC Tamment'a. R2S Fourlh street Cloudy 00-38 nuc SE; fined S15 and costs. Fair Improper turn Lcs' Mississippi Stages (Flood stilKcs in brackets) LaCrossc (12) 5.0, no change Lansing (18) 7.0, rise .1 Damfl (18) 12.6. fall .1 McGregor (18) (i.8, no chance Guttenberg (15) 4.1, no change Dllburiuc (17) 7.3, fall .2 Davenport. (13) 4.3, no change Keoltuk (16) 2.3, rise .1 Cedar at C.K. (13) 3.52, full Coralville Lake Pool level Thursday ....683.61 Births St. Lbke's Oct. To the families of Duaiic Funk, route 3, Marion, a daughter; Elias Nassif, 4501 Regal avenue NE, a daughter; Norman Goodcll, 5517 Sharon lane NW, a son; Timothy Nemcc, 1611 Park Towne lane NE, a son; Rick Kctchum, 811 Thirteenth street NW, a daugh- ter. Marriage Licenses Janet Voss, Walker, and Charles Collingwood, Center Point. Marriages Dissolved Michclc J. and Paul F. Seharff. Pamela Johanna and Douglas Alan Thomson. Sandra A. and Colin R. Howrcy. Thom- as and Rose M. Kennedy. Fires p.m. Wednesday. Un- known to leaves at 1611 Eleventh avenue SW. p.m. Wednesday. Mis- taken alarm at Fourth street and First avenue NE. p.in. Wednesday. Nui- sance cull at Twelfth street and Twenty-first avenue SW. p.m. Wednesday. 1'i'r- son or persons unknown to tree at Forest drive and Collage Grove avenue SK. a.m. Thursday. Slinrl in transformer at ninth street. NK. Drive Safely NW; fined and costs. Improper passing- Carol Bowdish, Central City; fined and costs. Traffic signal violation Michael Jordan, Swishcr; Jo- seph Ritchie. 1055 Tenth street, each fined and costs. Kenneth ITcpkor, (i06 lecond avenue SW: Daniel 450 Nineteenth street NW; each fined and costs. Ovcnvcishl Gene Croy, Swisher; fined and costs. Wayne Campbell, Todd- villc; fined and csots. Faulty equipment Jerry Franks, Springvillc: Daniel Matheny. 2553 N avenue NW: each fined and costs. Prohibited parking Goldic Horn, 1554 Eighth nvcnuc SE; lined and costs. Iowa Deaths Karlville Margaret S. Or- cutt, 83. Sunday at 2 at Clif- ton's where visitation will be licld after 7 Friday. Burial: Fairview cemetery. Memorial fund established. dustrialized countries rose an average of percent in the year ending Aug. 31, the Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development reported Thursday. "The continuing rapid price increase in most countries re- flects strong cost pressures on manufactured goods emanating from (lie wholesale it said. Amone OECD members. Ice- land had by far the highest inflation rate with a 41.1 percent average during the 12-month period. Four other countries Greece, Turkey, Portugal and Japan had rates just over 25 percent. The lowest rales were record- ed in West Germany, G.9 per- cent; Sweden, 9.2; the Nether- lands 9.8; Austria and Norway 9.9 each. In all countries, inflation was running two to three times as high as the average increase in the 10 years prior to 1971. The annual rate in the U. S. was 11.2 percent; in Canada, 10.8; in Australia, 14.4. Rates in other European coun- tries were France, 141-i percent; Italy 20.4; Britain 10.9; Belgium H.G; Denmark 1C; Ireland 17.9; Finland Spain 15.3; Swit- zerland, Boys Charged in Theft of 12 Watches Three juvenile boys we Born Dec. 14, 1902, in Win- neshiek county, he was a retired employe of Wilson and Co. and :iad been employed by Jack Cookman's detective agency until recently. Mr. Curtis was a 50-year member of Crcsco IOOF, Cresco Rcbekah lodge and the Methodist cliurch in Cresco. Surviving are his wife, the former Marian Rose Manuel, to whom be was married June 12 at Harmony, Minn.; three daughters, Mrs. Marvin Lukes, Cedar Rapids, Mrs. Edward Bouska, Waterloo, and Mrs. John Gladwin, DCS Moines; a son, Manuel Curtis, Cresco, and 19 grandchildren. Services: Friday at 10 a.m. in Kuba funeral home cast, by the Rev. A.J. Stokes at 2 p.m. in Crcsco Methodist church by the Rev. Wayne Wasta. Burial: Kendallvilic Eddy cemetery. Friends may call at Kuba funer- our determination to continue and expand coopera- tion and make a joint contribu- tion to peace." The second statement was on the development of economic, industrial and technological co- operation. nent on his pardon for Pres- dcnt Nixon prior to appearing icforc a house judiciary subcom- mittee Oct. 17. Even though many economists jolh in and out of government rccl the economy is at recession levels, Ford said, "I do A fund-raising candy sale by the Cedar .Rapids chapter of the National Federation of the Blind is currently uriderway through- out the area. Floyd Moore, chapter pres- ident, announced that represent- atives will be at the Collins plant Friday to sell the candy at a box. The sale, Moore said, is statewide venture, undertaken to earlier conference. He declined (iarrity's order, carried mil. have consistently opposed forced Ford said. Violence Spread Boston has been wracked by arrests and injuries in racial in- con" told by another woman that she  rogram every consideration jut much more needs lo be con- sidered. "The economic summit is bc- lind Mansfield said. "The .'resident's recommendations are before us. I regret to say, lotwilhstanding, that the twin crises for the nation remain and loom at least as large as ever." By twin crises, Mansfield said lie was referring to "an unre- lenting and intolerable rate of inflation and a deepening reces- ion." lie told a conference of Demo- cratic senators that required ac- tion "encompasses more than 10-poinl programs which begin with Ihe imposition of grcalei lax burdens on families with an- nual incomes of "What has been advanced as a remedy for our situation bears too close a resemblance to the fiscal and monetary policies of Ihc previous administration, pol- icies which havc long since proved to be inadequate to meet the he said. Votes Agency To Monitor Grain WASHINGTON (UPI) The house has approved a federal agency designed to monitor and block, if necessary, such foreign deals as the Russian grain con- tract President Ford balled Sat- urday. The house voted 375 to 4 Wednesday to set up a five- member commission with power to require daily reports on coin- 111 cjv.i voo the Potomac, river from the cap- Wednesday as police dispersed crowds of rock-and-bottle-throw- ling black youths. Police said Black Lyes, Stripper pcrsms were jnjurcd, The Washington Post one, a white man, was hospital sources as saying MrsJbadly hurt. He was hospitalized Battistella, 33, had two black.in fair condition with head inju- eyes and had identified herself Iries. to officials there as a stripper. School attendance Wednesday Bcrtrap. said she has accom- dropped lo 63.5 percent city- panied Mills to the restaurant wide, compared with 72.3 per- on several occasions in the cent Tuesday and a peak of 80.8 three months that he has been percent last Thursday, manager of the night club. She White House Press Secretary Ron Nessen, speaking before news of White's statement reached Washington, ruled out federal intervenlion in the Bos- ton controversy unless and until "resources available at the local and state level'1 are fully used. Nessen said Ford believes the judge acted correctly in reject- ing White's request for U.S. marshals. Nessen said "There are no second thoughts" about the President's comments'Wednes- day and Ford docs not consider he in any way gave "aid and comfort" to busing opponents. The secretary said Ford con- siders the order on busing to be the law. r d j g lo Bcrtran, a j silver-haired Cuban, the night View c'ul) caters primarily lo Amcri- cans during the week and to members of Washington's Latin American community on Sun- days. It is fairly expensive, with drinks costing each. He said Mills and his parly of four others were joined briefly by two other women whom he didn't know. The group drank one bolllc of champagne and some oilier drinks and the two bills SCO-plus and werc paid in cash by Mills. In Little Rock, Ark., Mills' op- ponent for re-election, Mrs. Judy Petty, said, "No comment. It's a personal problem and 1 have no comment." Everett Ham, Mrs. Petly's campaign manager, said, "We felt we were going to win any- way. Wo felt like we had a win- ning candidate before any of these circumstances occurred." Exxon Increases Heavy Oil Price HOUSTON (AP) Blaming a iax boost in Venezuela, Exxon Co. USA has added 40 cents per barrel lo all its domestic prices for heavy fuel oil. Development Fund Prospects Good: Aller Prospects for complete feder- al funding of the new communi- ty development act look good, according to Tom Aller, Cedar Rapids intergovernmental coor- dinator. Aller represented the mayor Wednesday in Kansas City at a briefing for elected officials and staff members from cities in modity futures trading. It now goes to the senate. The commission could seek court action lo block contracts for future deliveries of agricul- tural and other commodities i which could bring shortages onj IhcU.S. market. An 'Exxon spokesman said Nebraska, Missouri and Wednesday the Venezuelan gov- ernment levied a 3.5-pcrcent tax ncrease on Exxon suppliers Oct. 1. Rules of the U. S. Federal Energy Administration allowed increased costs of foreign sup- plies to be passed on .to con- umers. Exxon said heavy fuel oil is used by industries and big apartment complexes, but it is not ordinarily used by individ- uals. Bui the spokesman conceded that because it is an important source of industrial energy, the new price adds to the cost of certain products and eventually is paid by the consumer. '6- Many Undecided As British Vote LONDON (AP) Britons, plagued by predictions of eco- nomic woe voted for a new gov- ernment Thursday. Opinion polls showed undecid- ed voters might swing the elec- tion. The polls gave Prime Minister Harold Wilson's Labor party lends of between 5 and 10 per- cent, over Edward Heath's Con- servatives. Hut each poll contained a large portion of "don't knows." Voters in this category said they would not make up their minds until Ihe last minute. (Continued from Page 1.) avoid the possibility that any party will have a "final say in the selection of the final panel." It would require the defense at briefing by Don to exercise two or three and Bob (ijrcc. lengcs in each of Ihe first .md director of rounds lo the government's one. aml redevelopment. A second procedure advocated I_____J___________________. by the government would be to reshuffle the names of prospec- flowers can say everything 3G4-8130 Phone Answeiert 24 Houts Emy Kansas. Chief speaker at Ihc briefing was James Lynn, secretary of housing and urban development. "He indicated to the partici- pants that he felt very con- fident" about the funding, Aller said. The legislation, designed to replace programs such as urban renewal, among others, authorizes billion nation- wide during fiscal 1975, plus million in discretionary funds. If the full amount is appropri- ated, Cedar Rapids will receive approximately in en- titlement funds, in addition lo any funds that may be received under other sections of the bill. Aller said the briefing offered "no surprises" regarding the legislation, just a clarification and explanation of the act and estimates of when the regula- tions governing its implementa- tion will be published. Cedar Rapids was also rcpre- order be known in advance so that Ihe defense "would not be able lo pick the "known individ- uals." For Any Occasion FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS FLOWER ir F.T.O. Flornt 1800 mils Blvd. NW FI.OWF.lt IMIOMi; _ faithful service since 1847 MARION SPRINGVILLt-CENIER POINT WALKER'COGGON'CENTRAL CITY and in Cedar Rapids THE BEATTY BEURfE CHAPEL   

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