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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Wednesday, October 9, 1974 - Page 7

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 9, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Safety step-up urged The Cedar Kauids Wed.. Ort. II. 7A By John E. Homer WASHINGTON Traiisporlalion ol canines In air. sea. rail road iind waterway is a maior iind ino, probli'in in the Culled Slab's Tli risinK frequency nf mishaps uivolvini: dangerous malcrials has caused wide- spread public concern aboiil (he pnlenlial lor ii catastrophic accident. materials shipments present an increasing danger In public safely." Ihe General Accounting Office said lasl year in a special report to congress. "Kaeh year, hundreds nf new' malcrials are developed. Ihoiisands of shipments are made dally, and annual volume is expected lo reach l.f> billion Ions by lilKII." Actually, nn one knows exactly how much hazardous is beinj; shipped today. William .1 Hums, director of Ihe transportation department's Office of Materials, estimates lhal the figure may already lie two billion Inns a year. Airline passengers have been aston- ished iind iiiiLjered In learn (hat radioac- tive materials are rnulinely carrier! in the baHnaKc compartments of C. S passenger flights. Last April, a radioac- tive industrial isotope shipment leaked iluriiiK a flight from Washington. C.. to Hilton KOIIHO. La., exposing mure than -HO airline passengers, crew members and erouiid handlers to excess radiation The airlines also carry other ous materials such as chemicals and acids, compressed cases, explosives or animiimtinn, disease viruses, poisons and corrosive nr flammable liquids none nf which is allowed In he carried nn passenger trains or buses. The Air Line Pilots Assn.. in nne survey, found that !lll percenl of all C S. passenger fli.uhls carry male- rials. The Kedoral Aviation Administra- tion contends that the correct figure is only percent, lull the KAA's survey methods have been widely criticized. Hep. .lack Hrooks chair- nf Ihe hnuse subcommittee on u'ov- ernment activities. said that "KA.Vs Testimony precedent clouded on ol The safely record can largely he atlribuled In luck and il is just a mailer nf lime before lhal hick is [n run nul and a disaster involving hax.ardnus materials aboard a passenoor-earryine, aircral'l will injure nr kill many people." Railroads are also carrying an in- creasing amount of dangerous cai'Lin, yel rail accidents reached a Ill-year liiHh lasl year, due largely to deteriorating tracks and eipiipmenl. Tile aeeidenl rate is run- nin.e, even higher Ihis year, to a reeenl report from Ihe house intervale iind foreign cnmmeree commillec. II said lhal the Federal Railroad Admin- istration had only inspectors for over .'IIIII.IIIIO miles nf track. malcriais are passing hourly over poor tracks in Ihe mnsl heavily populated region nf Hie country, literally exposing millions nf people to potential danger without their even knowing Hie dancer the report said. About one nl oven. Ill trucks on the highway today is carryiim cxplnsive. llammalde nr I'loisniinus and ac- cording to Ihe transportation depart- ment, there are "ill.null accidents every year. In Ihe Federal Highway Administration received more than li.lKJII reiinrls of incidents invnlvino. earnnes. which thai year killed people, injured and caused S-l.ll million worth of properly damage. Abonl -a iH'rcenl oi' all materials shiiiped in the I'mled Slates u-o by water, with petroleum inakinu' up the bulk of these shipmenis. There are more than 211.Illlll liarees plyino; Hie nation's in- land and onaslal waterwavs. and tral'lic is expecled In increase by nearly 'ill percent ill Ibis decade acci- dents involving malcriais have more lhan doubled in reeeul years, .vcl barr.ino, is considered atjinno, Ihe saf- est means of transporting ha-'ardnus cargoes The buri'cnninr. shipments nf nil and liquefied natural aboard tankers and supertankers have spurred new anxiety ahnul spills nr explosions al sea or in purl. The ncwesl supertankers are tin sell-propelled vessels ever bnill and when fully loaded they have aboard as much potential thermal energy as a two-megaton hydrogen bomb. Yel these ships are mnsl dangerous when empty as hydrnearbnn vapors fill their hnlds and can lie touched off by Iho s.liuhtest spark. Charges are lhal federal transportation safely regulations either are no! beiiiii enforced nr are no! slrici ennmdi to ensure public safety The (Icn- era! Accniintine; Office lol'l congress Ihe dciiartmenl of transportation needed to improve Us inspccdon and enforcement program, and to gather more basic data on shipments The KAA has been severely criti- by Hie An- Line Pilots Assn. and Ralph Nader's Aviation Consumer Action Project for lax eiiforcemenl and weak rcuul.ilions. The pilots have called for a ban on cargoes aboard pas- senger flights, wilh Ihe major exception of radinpharmaeciilicals intended for medical use. Some pilots have taken mailers into Ilieir nun li.iiid. lights until all cargoes are removed. The Nailer Kroup is that airline pas- seiiKors demand In know if any hazard- ous is on board, and refuse In fly or change lilxnls I! lilere Is. While (here seems to be nn way In guarantee lhal accidents invnlviim haz- ardous cargoes will not happen, there is much that can be done to decrease Ihe chances lhal Ihey will happen. Bill as dangerous materials continue In prnlifer- and sliijniients of hazardous cargoes mullipfv. leehnnlo.uy and safely may both be increasingly hard pressed. By Ted Vaden WASHINGTON rven I hunch Ihe While House denies il. President Kurd's ilecisinn to appear before a house subcommittee inqiiirini; into his pardon nf Richard Nixon may indeed set a new precedent. II may be the first lime in hislory a President has formally testified before a congressional committee- While House spokesmen have been careful to point out lhal Kurd's appear- ance before the house judiciary siih- cnmmittee nn criminal justice, scheduled for Oct. III. will be voluntary Thus, they say. Kord will not be erodini: executive powers by subjcctiiit; himself In future demands that he testify on oilier mat- Bui White House officials are on less substantial .urouml when Ihey cite two other limes Ihcv say Presidents have appeared befnre cnimressional cnmntil- tees. One such appearance, involving (lenrse Washington, probably never happened. The other, by Abraham Lin- coln, is mil well documented and nimhl not have taken place, cither. The White House claimed Hint CienrKC Washington appeared in 17112 be- fore a special house committee invcsti- KiitiiiK an "ill-fated military expedition" led against a small body nf Indians by Maj. Ceil. Arthur SI. ('lair. Al the re- finest nf congress, Washington "ad- dressed Hie mailer." presumably before a committee, accnrdnif; I" Hie White House. The second a While llnnsc spokesman maintained, came in ISII2 when Lincoln wen! before the house judiciary commillce to explain the leak of Ins Stale of the I'ninn message to Ihe New York Herald. Rumor had linked Ihe disclosure to Lincoln's wife and led to charges thai she sympathised with the confederate cause. The While House spokesman said bolh precedents were uncovered in re- search by Ihe Library' of However. Harold ficlvea. a peci.ih-l on exeiutiu privilege .1! lln lahrar. s re- eat eh -en i> ipiev- linned Ihe validity of these appearance's as precedents ('ilnn: a sludv bv Slepheii Horn. "The Cabinet anil said Washington not only never appeared bi'fnri1 Ihe linnse or a house lommillce, bill thai he never was asked to appear The house had requested nnlv lhal tun; ever -.our document-, ri'lalcd In the SI flair cxpeililion The lirsl President did -.0 aflei delcrmniini: their release "would not iniuie Hie pub- lic 'Ihe l.ibrarv aiialy-i ol no other eviileiKe that mild Hie While House's I'llalioii nf Ihe incident as pfeedcn! "faille Ihe eonlr.irv he s.nd. "il's ofti n cited a- the lirsl Illlla- WASHINGTON Waslmmlnn did appear before tin' full senate not a committee in In seek "advice and consent" nn his Ireatv neuntialions with Hie Creek Indi- ans When the senate balked at Ins proposals U'ashin'rlnn stormed out in a "violent fret" and never a.nain consulted wilh the senate before ratification, tlius sellini; annlher precedent. There is -Iroiiu'er evidence for Ihe Lincoln precedent cited, bill Relyea said il was larsely unsubstantiated. Hislnnans I'nnnd no official records of Ihe meeting. The Herald and al leasl four other papers rc- ill l-'cbruary. !Hli2. lhal Lincnln appeared befnre the house .judiciary committee in an effort to prevent the "disgrace" threatened by clamor over Ihe leak. Hut Relyea noted lhal an ac- cnunl nf Ihe incident by Hen IVrlcy I'oore. a hi.uhly regarded diarist of the period, indicated lhal the appearance was more in the nature nl an informal moetiiiL: vvilh house members. sources had Lincoln appearing before a joinl commillec on Ihe conduct of Ihe war lo explain his war policy, but those accounts alsn are subiecl In iiiieslion. The cnmmillee was a panel formed in INIil by anti-Lincoln Radical Repub- licans In press the adminislralinn inr military action and emancipation nf Ihe slaves. Accnrdino, In newspaper aecnunts al the lime, Lincnln met wilh Ihe lamely, al leasl five times in ISIil and 1KB2. bill each lime with his full cabinet and al leasl once a! Ihe While House. Modern Presidents regularly have appeared before congress lo deliver Stale of Ihe t'nion messages. The difference belwoon those and Knrd's scheduled appearance is lhal Ihe President will he subjected lo posed by sub- committee members. "I would hope we will nut be intim- idated ill performing our job" nf qnes- linniim Ford, said Hep. Ilollx- man a member nf Ihe panel who posed some of Ihe sharpest (pies- linns lo witnesses when Ihe judiciary committee held hcariims on the impeachment. "I've taken an oath of office, and J [eel my job is. wilh all due respect and courtesy Inward Ihe President. In try lo obtain answers In our questions." Rep. told Congressional (Juarlcrly. "We've had experience with witnesses Way with words By Theodore M. Bernstein Tf A I'KHSn.N was called a soorh- I (and lo forestall a likely lvpocriiphic.il error lhal word will he here repealed would von sav he is a 1 la r.' Thai's vv hal l-'ran kiln W I'nwers. a punster of Cdetlsidc. Pa wauls lo know The answer is, surely The archaic word means truth or fact and one who kills the Irulli obviously is a liar Now if Mr. Powers will hack to play- no- on br. Ivre msle.nl of plav on: on his liar, we can on to more import.ml business A Col inelsv Several weeks a ii-l- nmnisl vvnite, "Mr Xixoii's various have stressed a strict rather lhan a broad rc.uhin: of Ihe Constilu- and lhal caused Owen Kiddle, an alleriiev. nl Hrvn M.tvvr. Pa to pose Ihe ijUestlon vvhellier (oonsels is I-10: lish One dictionary Hie Heritage il is; nlhers indicate lhal both the singular noun and Ihe plu- ral are counsel. The bio; (Ixfnrd dictionary does cite one quotation IISIIIK Ihe jilural counsels. Hy Thomas .lefferson ol all people anil dated I7K1I. it reads as lollovvs' "They have one of Ihoir ablest counsels wilh Ihe preparation of a memoir to establish this." Mr Kiddle says thiit sounds awkward and he is nc.lit. The awkwardness derives from Hie extreme ran'; of the word, Knth Ihe quoted ahine and Mr .Icffcr- snn would have been well advised In use lawyers, nifornoy; or loaol rather lhan counsels. On the oilier hand, a recent nil a incline of a hearniL: u! Ihe lioic.e in- diciarv coiiimillce reierrcd to half a men represcnlno: diflcrenl prin- cipals in Ibis wav "Al Ilic' lable in Ihe foreground are Ihe counsrl.v" Neither counsel nor one of Ihe synonyms just mcnlinned would ilo Ihe in this 1111- ir-.n.d llislalK c Reg. 42.95. Our 100% lex- turized blazer-slyle Styled with center venf and patch pockets. In a handsome selection of solid colors For -azes 38 lo 46 46. Reg. Men's polyester dou- ble knit slacks with flare leg styl- ing and wide belt loops. In crisp patterns for sizes 30 to 42. Q 3Q Reg. The classic shirt in polyester. Peach or lilac print. 8-1 8. Re9- Button front R'eg. Poll-on plaid acrylic boucle sweater in ponts in peach-white or peach or lilac. S-M-L liloc-while polyester. 8-1 8. Reg. Shirt jacket of polyester in or 8- 18. Recj. Pull-on pants in peach or lilac polyester 8-18 A great buy for all the boys, from biggest to smallest. Now's the time to boy a bundle and save. Choose briefs, T-shirts or polo shirts. All cut for comfort and easy wear. Polyesler-cotton blend or all cotlon in sir.es 4-20. Reg. 3 for 2.89 3 for 3.25 3 for 3.98 Sale 3 for 2.31 3 for 2.60 3 for 3. IS aave 584 654 RCK 20% off these curtains .J--S1 i! j 'bi'-l :4.'K ICE 3.69 Sale 2.55 6Bi30" lit 3.J3 Sale 3113 ICR. Sale3B3 Valance 2.95 Sale ?.39 Rayon airlains wilh cot- ton ball fringe ac- cessor ics. 80i24" fE6. 3 99 Sale 3 19 8Di30" IBB. 4.29 Sale 3.43 i 8IM6" IBE. 4.49 Sale 3 59 Vabticd tef, 2.89 Sale 2 31 i Certom', of Dnnon'S) flocke-rl dots. 3.99 Sale 3 19 top, 4.49 Sale 3 59 ICB Sale 3 99 Valance ice 3 99 Sjlc 39 Cilllciins die polyeslu- loyoo with knilted hot- toni Sum of i-oiton- nc'vlk 'oyon Von qel nreni qiont f.! And n looi< fnr lendy nrule bom cvei 70 700 p.nit'., ..bi'ei ill ei.il.. loil.iw (lie i.ie.r.onn.i lio.v, below, bring ir, Ibi; To mccisure: Wuiib me, iso, r from lo iflj. ni simply the I 1. 1. ir ll-'i'l I1 1) ..I I Add d Charge it at JCPenney, 109 Second St S '-I. Ojjen 5 Wightr. 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