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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 4, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - October 4, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Delaware County Targets Landfill Opening for Nov. I By Larry Tanner Marion's council Thursday night approved the Marion airport advisory coiiunilUM1 report which reviewed Ihe Mirkham Miehael. consult- iinls. airport professional study. The eomiinltee report re- jected tiie consultant's suggos- IIIIM Ihal a new airport be located north of the city on prime agricultural land. The committee, instead, recom- mended the city develop (he existing private airport on the eastern edge of Marion. The consultant evaluated four potential sites. The committee report said: "Phase II of the report ova! nates four potential sites for airport purposes and recom- mends Site No. 2 north of the city should be acquired for the Marion airport. "We have reviewed this rec- ommendation and find that in our judgement Site No. could be an excellent airport site. However, we do not feel that it is reasonable or practi- cal to develop this site which is located north of Marion and on excellent agricultural land. "It is nur recommendation that Site 1. an existing airport. located on the east edge of Marion, be renovated and improved to serve our cnmmunitv. We feel Ihe loca- The Marion Independent school board Thursday even- ing took action to move junior high classes to the educational areas of the First United Methodist' and First Presby- terian churches. .lohn Fowler, junior high principal requested this ac- tion, noting that Ihe building temperature Thursday was M degrees, with more cold weather predicted. Fmvlcr said classes would begin in the churches on Tues- day and hopefully could return !o Ihe junior high building in 2 to weeks. Half Attend Only half of the students will attend classes at a time. Half will attend from 8 a.m. until a.m. The other half will attend classes from p.m. until 4 p.m. No hot lunches will be served In jun- ior high students during this Only essential classes such as English, math, science and social studies will meet during this period. Seventh grade classes will meet at the Methodist church and Kighth grade classes will meet at the Presbyterian church. The band will hold individual les- sons only and will be held as arranged at the junior high building. Boilers Ready Tom Bowker Plumbing and Heating has been told that the boilers will be ready for ship- ment Oct. 15. He will send his own truck for them which will require about two days travel lime and then it will require three to four days to install the boilers. In additional action regard- ing the new building and re- modeling of the existing build- ing, the board approved about SKl.OfKI worth of change or- ders. Herb Stone, architect, re- ported that most of the rock is now removed. It was found to be in larger quantity than originally thought but it was easier to move then expected. The firm removing the rock has agreed to submit a bill for Mine and materials rather iiiiiii Ihe originally agreed to v7fi per cubic yard, which should result in a savings to Ihe district. Footings have been poured as well as Ihe foundation walls next to the building. Work is approxi- mately weeks behind schedule at this point but Stone expects some time to be up now. The Best Carpet Buys Are At Carpetland U.S .A. tion of Site 1 provides excel- lent access to our community anil one north-south runway that is hard surfaced will provide a practical runway configuration. "The location of Iho site also would permit orderly land use planning consistaut with Marion's newly adopted comprehensive community plan "We feel Marion should develop an airport that can provide most of these faciities. However, it is more important Ihal Mariuon have an airport in the immediate future that is practical and within our capabilities." Salt Supply Domlar Chemicals. Inc.. was low bidder for the city's bulk salt supply for the 1974-75 winter. Domtar bid per Ion. Other bidders were: ('argil Salt, Marlon Salt Co. Diamond Crystal Salt Co.. In- ternationa! Salt Co., American Salt. S18.HO: Inde- pendent Salt Co.. Domtar's bid was accepted by Ihe council. City Attorney Robert .1. Stone reminded property own- ers with 1974 paving project No. 1 assessments lo pay that they have until Oct. 25 to pay all or part of their assessment at the city clerk's office al the city hall. After Oct. 25. they must pay their assessment in Fowler reported that roofers arrived on site Thursday aft- ernoon to start work on the old 'building. Sheets and Son Insurance reported that il could not ob- tain legal liability insurance within the guielines set by the board. Since present legal lia- bility insurance runs until Feb.. 1975. Ihe board will readvertise for bids for legal liability insurance only. Hal Van Nest, representing St. Joseph booster club, in- quired about purchasing the four folding bleachers present- ly in the junior high building as they will no longer be used after the new building is completed. The board told him that they would be using the bleachers probably through Ibis school year but that they will inquire a to how St. Joseph's could obtain them. Family Passes Los Dnllinger. activities director, explained about complimentary tickets. Fami- ly passes are given to profes- sional staff who work at least line event. Custodial and non- certified staff are given passes for themselves and spouse. It was suggested that next year they also be asked to work al one event. Hoard passes are issued for families of board members. Senior citizens passes are also availale at the high school or they will be admitted free to all school events nn their medi-care cards. Interest has been expressed for opening school gyms on Sunday afernoim. Dnllinger re- ported that the Marion Mill- islerial Assn. is in favor of this. No professional staff was interested in supervising this activity but the booster club indicated (hat it might be. There is a need and a desire fur Ibis service, he said. the Linn county treasurer's office. The assessment also will have seven percent inter- rate attached lo it al Ihe court house Stone said the clerk's office also has had calls concerning what effect Ihe conversion to a fiscal year will have on the property owners lax pay- ments. Stone said Ihe first in slallmenl of taxes will be due in March, 1975. A mailing from (lie treasurer's office of payment notices for Ihe first installment will be made. Park Fund Approval was given to a park board request to pay 81.- 500 from the park fund ac- quisition and development account for survey work on Ihe Krumboltz property purchased by the city from the Marion Independent school district. The park site is 17 acres ill size. The contract and perform- ance bond for Ihe F and S Electrical Contractors. Inc.. for the underground wiring work in city park was ap- proved. Contract is for Work is expected to begin Oct. 14 on Ihe projecl which will require several days for com- pletion. Approval was given to the payment of tn U.A. Westbrock Construction. Inc.. for remodeling work al (hi1 public library, and lo the Applcby and Horn. Inc.. firm for library carpeting work. Both were final payments. Second reading was ap- proved for the ordinance amendment vacating street between Marion hull- levard and the Milwaukee Railroad tracks. Monlc Carhi Night. Kun and (lames. Music by "The Madd- ness" formerly members of the Brass Unlimited. Saturday. October 5. K p.m. to 2 a.m. Exhibition Ilall-Hawkeye Downs. admission. Tickets al the door. Proceeds go hi Boys Acres. Bertram. HH II. Cedar Kapids. Iowa, A (iroup Home for homeless and troubled boys. Monlc Carlo Night is sponsored by Independent Order of Foresters. Celebrating their I lltlth Bookkeeper mornings 5 day week, must be able lo type. Boston Kites T. Sloan, II a.m. Saturday at the Cedar Memorial Chapel uf Memories with Ihe Rev. Fdware Mails of Alburnett United Methodist church officiating, liurial: Cedar Memorial cemetery. Cedar Memorial has charge. Need volunteer help Satur- day October 5, 9 a.m. lo work on Granger house. Remove porch, wallpaper, clean carriage house, etc. Dale Miner. (larage night Saturday and Sunday 9-5. 2420 12th Avenue.-Adv. VMCA Saturday's activi- ty schedule a! Ihe Marion branch VMCA is: Non-aquatic Saturday fun club a.m.. junior high gym cheerleading II, adult gym noon, family gym 3, gymnas- tics club 4; pool pre-school lessons 9 a.m., youth recrea- liona! swim junior high recreational swim noon, adult and family recreational swim I p.m. New Low Bids For Linn-Mar Bus Building By Pal Peterson The Linn-Mar school board, after months of Irving to re- duce costs of a bus garagc- mainteiiancc building lo a level the district could afford. Thursday night accepted low bids totaling for construction of the building Successful bidders were Kl View Construction, general contractor; Modern Piping, mechanical contractor, and Fowler Flectric. electrical contractor. The bids do not include site work, bus heaters or a fence, estimated to add about lo Ihe project's cost. When original bids for the building were submitted, they came in al more than Board members and the district architect pared speci- fications lo an estimated cost of and decided lo rebid the building, measures which resulted in the lower bids. A public hearing was held prior to the opening of bids, bill no one spoke for or against Ihe projecl. After an hour-long executive session, the Linn-Mar board voted to extend the leave of absence of Sandra Brown for Ihe remainder of (he school yejr. C.arago Sale: Sal 8-4. furni- ture, clothing, toys and mis- cellaneous. IB5 Will SI. Court. Gordon Kites Services for Hugh F. Cordon. 73, of 925 Fifteenth avenue, who died Thursday, will be at p.m. Saturday in First Presbyteri- an church. Friends may call al Murdoch chapel until 9 p.m. Friday and at the church after 11 a.m. Saturday. Memo- rial contributions may be made lo First Presbyterian church. Thanks lo many friends for cards, flowers, gifts while I was a patient al SI. Luke's hospital. Kspecially lo Ihe Kev. Mr. Miller. Bertha Miller. Adv. Beautician, full or part time, Wilson Beauty Salon. 377- Liquor Decanters DFS MOINFS (CP1) State liquor officials say they have received applications from persons who want a chance lo buy liquor de- canters in the likeness of the University of Iowa's "llorky the Hawk" and Iowa State's "Cy tin1 Cyclone." The names will be placed in a lottery conducted by the state beer and liquor control department Monday to decide who will get the decanlers. The department has received of both mascots. The "winners" of the lot- tery will still have lo pay for Ihe hollies, officials said. Director Koland (iallagher said Thursday (hat numbers used for Ihe drawing were chosen by Polk county Asso- ciate District Judge Luther (ilantnn. (Jallagher said (ilanton chose the numbers 4. 7 and 10 and they will hi1 used by Ihe state's computer when il goes through the lists of persons who line applied for Ihe de- canters. SINGLE VISION CONTACT LF.Nnr.s DOWNTOWN CEDAR RAPIDS 106 FIRST ST., S.E TELEPHONE 364-2122 lly .Mary Hello MANCHKSTKK After Ihe Delaware county landfill offi- cially opens, all cities in Ihe county will have ,'HI days to finalize contracts for garbage- hauling operations lo the new facility, members of Ihe landfill commission decided Thursday night. t'nunty Supervisor Hill liurbridge said after Ihe garbage-hauling arrange- ments have been completed by the cities, the board of su- pervisors will permanently close all of the county dumps. That could be as soon as Dec. 1. according In informa- tion presented at Thursday's meeting. Opening Date Philip Mellol, president of Nishna Sanitary Service, op- erators of (he new landfill, said construction began Mon- day on the site and Ihe landfill One Fatality In Buchanan Road Crash WINTHHOP A car-truck crash three miles south of Wintbrop proved fatal Thurs- day to Helen Adeline Scott, HI. of rural Winlhrop. Mrs. Scott was dead on ar- rival at Peoples hospital. In- dependence, shortly after the II a.m. crash. It was Buch- anan county's eighth traffic death of the year. State troopers said Mrs. Scott's car collided with a straight truck driven by Bill Allen Postel. 21. also of rural Winlhrop. at Ihe intersection of two Buchanan county gravel roads. Both cars landed in the ditch following the crash. Passengers in Postel's truck were his wife. Charlotte, 19. and son, Jamie, nine months. Most seriously hurt was Mrs. Postel. who had chest, back and possible internal injuries. Her condition was described as serious Friday al Independ- ence hospital. Postel was in fair condition at Ihe same hospital with back injuries, and the baby, who had head injuries, was listed ill good condition. Troopers noted that the intersection where the crash occurred is not marked by stop signs. No charges were filed. Fawccll funeral home of Winlhrop has charge of serv- ice's for Mrs. Scott. Oelwein Host Saturday To 22 School Bands OKI.WKIN Twenty-two high school bands will partici- pate Saturday in Oelwein's annual band festival. Following an II a.m. pa- rade, participants will be served a luncheon at Hotel Iowa, where crowning of the festival queen will take place. The queen will be chosen from candidates from each band. Competition will begin al 1 p.m. at Ihe high school stad- ium. Winners should be an- nounced at about GAZETTE TELEPHONE NUMBERS Newi, Sporu, Bookkeeping, General Infor- malign and Office! Nat Listed Below mtm ifotion-Subiinptian Dept. 398-8333 Mon IhtuSol 8 o m In Sundnyi Until 12 Honn Holiday! 1! n.m ID 7 p m Wont 398-8231 Mon Ihru fn 8 n m to 5 p m Satutday until I? Noon Dniloy idviitnmq 3988222 n Ollite 398 8430 should be ready [or operation by Nov. I. weather permitting. If Nishna meets its target date, all of- the Delaware county communities should be using the landfill by Dec. I. and all dumps in Ihe county should lie chised al Hie same lime. During Thursday's meeting, attended by about III) persons including commission mem- bers and invited town repre- sentatives. Karlville became the final Delaware community to be accepted into the landfill program. "All the towns in Ihe county have now signed lo use the said Bur- bridge, chairman of the meet- ing. Garbage Hags Garth Arnold, city manager nf Manchester, said first read- ing of an ordinance allowing the use of approved plastic garbage bags in unijunction with use of the new landfill will be read at the regular meeting of the Manchester council Monday night. The city of Manchester plans lo discontinue hauling garbage and will contract with a commercial hauler, said Arnold. If the ordinance is approved, the hauler will then pick up only Ihe approved garbage bags, which will include the cost of his opera- tion in their purchase. Arnold said the city council had decided (his method would be Ihe fair approach lo lake considering Ihe differing amounts of garbage in various households. Karlvillc representatives said each household in Ibeir city pays per month for garbage hauling service re- gardless of the size of the family. Earlvlllc residents will continue lo pay a monthly charge, even afler the city starts using the landfill. Drive Benefits Fire Victims at Anamosa ANAMOSA A drive for clothing and money has opened in Anamosa benefit- ling members of Ihe Louis Siebels family, who lost all possessions when flames lev- eled their house southeast of Anamosa Thursday. (See sto- ry on page 5.) Money may he left al Citi- zens Savings bank; SI, Paul Lutheran church is collecting clothing. The' family also has need of workable appliances. Mrs. Siebels wears size IB clo- thing and her husband size .'18. Their son is 15 years old. Richardson, Armstrong At Convention DES MOINES (UPI) For- mer U.S. Ally. den. Elliot! Richardson and former Astro- naut Neil Armstrong will be among the speakers at week's Iowa Bankers Assn. convention. The convention will be the HBth annual gathering for the group and will run from Sun- day through Wednesday. Armsterong. the first man on the moon, and Richardson, who also served as secretary of defense and health, educa- tion and welfare, will address the more than delegates expected lo attend. Other speakers include Iowa's Iwo major party U.S. senate candidats .John Culver and David Stanley and former track star .lesse Owens. ON THIS DATE in HMO, dur- ing World war II. Adolf lliller and Benito Mussolini conferred al Brenner Pass in the Alps. Bremer Deputy Swears He Saw A Loose Moose KIOADLYN County Sheriff's Deputy Uich Lampe turned in a strange re- port (his week He says he spoiled whal he thought was a huge along highway .'I close to Ihe Wapsipinicon river bridge near Iteadlyn Tuesday night. The animal was about seven feet tall, with a big rack on Lampi'. Later Ihal night, a farmer near Dunkerton, south of Iteadlyn, also reported seeing something Ihal looked like a mouse. Hut (ilenn Angel, a state conservation officer al New Hampton, said it would be highly unusual for a moose to be in Iowa. He said he has looked around but has been unable to find any moose tracks. "I won't believe it till I see he said. Oktoberfest Begins At Amana Colonies AMANA (UPI) The An- ana Colonies' annual Okto- berfest begins here Friday (today) featuring German food, beer, entertainment and carnival booths. Friday's events include an authentic German stage show and dance. The Saturday features include a parade followed by entertainment, arts and crafls displays, and an evening dance. Winneshiek Site of Two Farm Fires DKCOKAII Deconih fire- men were busy Thursday night fighting two farm fires which broke out within an hour and a half of each other at widely separated points in Winneshiek county. Their first call was to Ihe Ciirsten ('lenient farm, four miles east of Decorah on the Old Stagecoach road, where a wumlshed. Iwo large pine trees and another small build- ing were ablaze. According tii the fire de- partment, buildings were ig- nited by flames which spread through the grass from a trash fire. The M. by woodshed, smaller building and trees were destroyed. Firemen were able lo keep flames from spreading to the house, al- though one side nf the slruc- lure was blistered by heat. The second fire occureri al p.m. Thursday on the Stanley Lensing farm south (if Decorah on the Middle Calmar road, about 10 miles southwest of Ihe site of the first fire. At Ihe Lensing place, a 15 by 30-foot hog house, seven sows and 65 young pigs were lost lo the fire. When the fire was first discovered by Mrs. Lensing, the hog house was al- ready engulfed by flames. According to the fire de- partment, damages at the Lensing farm are covered by insurance. Flames apparently broke out when some bedding in the hog house was ignited by heal lamps. 21 "Deluxe Seff-Propelled Easy fingertip starting Lawn-Boy engine Sately-guarded all-gear drive applies power lo the rear wheels. Safely interlock system prevents starting ol engine when drive is engaged Snap-on grass bag with pivoting support md lor close maneuvering Exlra quiet under-the-deck muffler Patented safety features 6 cutting heights 1-year warranty. 21" Solid State Pushabte Solid Stale Ignition with a hotter spark lor Quick starts new simnlitieri carburetor with tewer parts for Sure starts. Solid State means no condenser or points lo. replace. iwp-on grass hag with pivoting support rorl Patented safety features Under-the-deck muttler. 6 cutting heights I -year warranty. See your local Lawn-Boy dealer and check for availability of '74 models. 2180 7th Ave. Marion, Iowa 377-9064 Highest bank savings rafes allowed by law! "5 Passbook savings 5% will) No Miniumum MATURITY RATE 3-month 5 1 S? i VI M GUARANTY BANK TRUST CO. 3rd St. 8, 3rd Ave. Downtown 1819 42nd St. NE 191 Jacolyn Dr. NW Phone 362-2115 Momlvi F.D.I.C   

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