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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Saturday, September 28, 1974 - Page 1

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 28, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- cloudy fool lOHlghl, jSuniiy unil warmer Sunday. Ixiws (uuliiht in Sumluy jii 00S. VOLUME 92 CEDAK IIAPIDS, IOWA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1074 CITY FINAL 15 CENTS ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES UPI Tclcphoto o KIDNAPED Barbara Hutchison, kidnaped American diplomat, is shown being held under armed guard in the Venezuelan consulate in Santo Domingo. At the fright is guerilla leader Radames Mendez Vargas. Next to Miss Hutchison is Consul Jesus G regorio de Corral. NEW BULLETIN YORK (AP) A woman hostage in Santo Do- mingo said in a telephone call if (Eie terrorist demands are not met immediately "we will all die, In a matter of minutes of seconds." The woman identified her- self as Ambrosina Ares, a Do- minican secretary in the Vene- zuelan consulate. SANTO DOMINGO (UPI) Twenty-three leftist guerillas Saturday threatened to execute an American woman diplomat and seven other persons held hostage in the Venezuelan con- sulate unless the U. S. paid million ransom. The kidnapers said Ihe consul ate was wired with bombs ant they threatened lo blow it up with all the hostages inside i police or troops entered the building. They also demanded that the Dominican Republic free 37 po- litical prisoners. "If police try lo attack us, we will blow up the building, it is completely Radames Mendez Vargas, leader of the band, told UPI in a telephone interview. One Each Two Hours The guerillas sent word to President .1 o a q u i n Balaguer through a mediation team head- ed by Archbishop Hugo Eduardo Polanco Brito lhat they would start executing the hostages, one every Iwo hours, beginning at II. a.m. CDT Saturday, 24 hours after Ihe seizure. Later they extended the dead- line to 4 p.m. Police said lour men waving machine guns kidnaped Bar- bara Hutchison. 47, a Delaware native who heads Ihe U. S. Jn- formalion Service here, as she drove through a quiet street ir Ilic exclusive Naco scelion of Sanlo Domingo. The kidnapers forced her into another car and drove her to Ihe consulate, where they joined the rest of the band. Once inside, the commandos Today's Index Comics Church Crossword Daily Record Drains Editorial Features Financial Marion Mitvios Sports Television Ads .....2 2 4 ....II .....7 K n, ID 7 12-15 of the pro-Castro Jan. 12 Libera lion Movement seized seven other persons, including the Venezuelan consul, Jesus Greg- orio de Corral, and his vice- consul, Valdcmar Alvaradr.. "Fully Aware" "We are fully aware of Ihe implications of kidnaping Miss Hutchison. If this operation fails we are dead said Mendez Vargas, who was convicted of a 1970 plane hijacking to Cuba but later freed. He said the seizure was neces- sary "because the Dominican government has remained silent in the face of demands for democratization of the nation.' If demands were not met for the freeing of prisoners and million ransom from the Ameri- can imperialist the kidnapers said they would "eliminate all the hostages." It has been U. S. policy not to pay ransom demands. Balaguer said he was inclined to give safe conduct out of the 'country to the guerillas, but declined to release any prisoners. Cordoned Off U. S. Ambassador Robert Hurwilch met with Balaguer late Friday night but neither com- mented to newsmen afterward. Army sharpshooters occupied rooftops near Ihe consulate dur- ing the night. The area was cor- doned off by Iroops. The Jan. 12 Liberation Move- ment takes ils name from the day in 1972 when four leftist un- derground leaders and an es- timated 16 police were killed in a gunfight on the highway near Santo Domingo's airport. International ion Rock Loss WASHINGTON slumping stock (AP) markcl The cosl Vice-president-designate Nelson Rockefeller more than mil- ion in just Iwo months this slimmer, according lo comp-ara- ive figures for Ihe principal rust from which he gets in- Portuguese Chief Bows To Leftists LISBON, Portugal (AP) President Antonio de Spinola buckled under strong leftist pressure and called off a mass demonstration by his supporters Saturday. It was the first test of force between left and right since Ihe April 25 coup, and the left ap- peared to have carried the day. Spinola said the demon- stration, aimed at "leftist ex- would "not be conve- nient" because of "disturbances in public order earlier today." The left, with the Communists in the forefront, had issued call lo their followers "to take lo the streets to prevent the Fascist demonstration." Thousands of Portuguese from rural areas and suburbs of Lis- aon had poured into Ihe capital Jespite militant leftist attempts ;o isolate it with roadblocks. Tanks and armored units inged the presidential palace where the demonstration was scheduled to be held. The army was reported lo lave arrested scores, including some identified as extreme apparently trying to carry arms to the rally. Spinola reportedly has been engaged for weeks in a power struggle with Premier Vasco Goncalves' leftist coalition of Communists, Socialists and cen- rist Popular Democrats. The leftist had for days de- icunccd Ihe rally as a Fascisl ilot to launch an ultra-right movement. RENO (AP) Three men armed with revolvers and wear- ing Halloween masks robbed a downtown bank of more than million, authorities said. Police said the men, who were wearing aqua-colored overalls and were of medium build, dis- appeared after leaving their get- away van across the street from the sheriff's office. "It was a professional said Police Chief James Parker. "It obviously was planned very meticulously." An estimated was lakcn but the exact total will nol be known until an audit Mon- day, bank officials said. Virtually All The FBI in Las Vegas said the robbers took virtually alt the :ash the bank had on hand. Parker said the men ap- larcnlly hid in a downstairs area of the downtown branch of the First National Bank of Ne- vada until shortly after the closing time Friday. Then one of them jammed a weapon into the back of the as- sistant operations officer, Mary Cay Benndlt, and told her, "If ou say a word, I'll kill you." She was taken upstairs and lerded into a vault with eight thcr employes. They were 'handcuffed and hoglicd" but 10 one was harmed, police said. The men scooped cash from (Continued: Page 2, Col. 5.) WASHINGTON (UPI) Betty Ford, the nation's First Lady, underwent more than three hours of surgery Saturday for removal of a cancerous right breast. President Ford and the family were reported optimistic of the outcome. The breast was removed after team of doctors determined lhat a small, suspicious lump was malignant. Mrs. Ford, 56, was taken into Ihe operating room at Bcthesda laval hospital at 8 a.m. EOT, less than 48 hours after a rou- .ine medical examination. She was wheeled into the recovery room three hours and 45 min- utes later. "The operation concluded at approximately said a White House press spokes- man, Bill Roberts. "The Pres- ident visited briefly with Mrs. Ford immediately after the operation. "Are Optimistic" "The President and his family arc optimistic on the outcome of .he operation." A grim President left the hos lital a short time after seeing lis wife and headed for the eco nomic summit in downtown Vashinglon. President Ford learned lhat lie lump was malignant from Dr. William Lukash, the White House physician, who tele. Jhoned him in his Oval Office a! .ho White House. Ford flew to Bethesda by helicopter to be with liis wife after she came ou of surgery. "The results of the biopsy per- ormed on Mrs. Ford were unfa- An operation to remove icr right breast is now under- said Roberts in a brief jtatcmcnt to reporters an hour after the operation began. "AH Right" "I just returned from the hos- lital where I saw Betty as she Telephoto President Ford leaves Bethesda Naval hospital with his daughter-in- law, Gail, after visiting his wife. :ame f r o m the operating Ford told delegates to he economic conference. "Dr. jukash has assured me that she amc through the operation all ighl." That drew a round of ap- ilause. "It's been a difficult 36 Ford said. "Our faith rill sustain us. Betty would ex- icct me to be here." "Great Spirits" Nancy Howe, Mi's. Ford's :iend and. personal secretary, aid the First Lady was in 'great spirits" before the peration. It was performed by Navy apt. William Fouly, chief: of urgcry at the Bcthesda facility, (Continued: Page 2, Col. 5.) Federal Economic Efforts Being Executive Board WASHINGTON (AP) Pres'-iVhe Amcrtctm people anffVttf ident Ford Saturday announced congress a program of actio the consolidation of all federal government economic efforts under a new executive board and named a labor-management committee from outside govern- ment lo him solve the na- tion's economic problems. He announced the steps he is taking at the windup of a two- day economic summit confer- ence. He delivered the speech after visiting his wife in subur- ban Bethesda Naval hospital. Ford said Treasury Secretary William Simon would serve as lis principal spokesman on eco- nomic policy. Other members ol the executive board are cabinel officials, Budget Director Roy Ash, and Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Council of Eco- nomic Advisers. Execulive Order Ford said he has already is- sued an executive order consoli- dating all government economic efforts, domestic and intcrna- .ional, under a new Economic 'olicy Board headed by Simon. Ford praised the delegates for heir contribution lo Ihe slrug- ;le against inflation and said, 'Now it is my turn." "In the days immediately he said, "I will offer to On June ils portfolio, I he >ulk it in a dozen common slocks, was worth million. On Aug. it was worth nillion. And since I hen it may have Iropped another million. I'an Am Layoff HONOLULU (AP) Pan American World Airways is lay- ng off flighl ath'iidanls jiisnd in Ihe U. S., an executive if the financially-lronbled air- ine said Friday. iy Associated Press Federal agencies are inves- igaling complaints of faulty ome canning equipment, fol- owing reports from some areas f the West thai Ihe lids don't eal properly, causing food lo poil. An Associated Press survey howcd Ilic problems come on lop of a nationwide shortage of canning equipment that is frus- trating consumers trying to save money by pulling up Ihcir own fruits and vegetables. Officials of Ilic major manu- facturers of canning jars deny lhat the equipment is faulty and claim consumers aren't follow- ing directions. II o u s e w i v e s who've been canning for years arc skeplical. Recall Refused ,lanc Wyalt of Ihe Oregon de- partment of agriculture said that complaints were pouring inlo her office about lids thai fail lo seal properly and resull in spoiled food. luring Co. of Sand Springs, Okla., lo recall ils lids but. il refused. "This is terribly frustrating to said Miss Wyalt, who re- ported (hat consumers com- plained anywhere from 80 lo percent of lids in a given balch lurcr, said: "We find if lids aren't scaling, il's because peo- ple aren't following correct can- ning procedures." Tony White of the Washington stale attorney general's office said many of the problems were due lo inexperience and the list not seal properly. "The of unsuccessful canncrs includ- company refused to recall the lids and I don't know thai there's anything we can do about ii. I'm nol. sure we have any basis lo lake legal action." Harold Melskcr, a plant man- ager for Kerr, said: "We had' some problems. They seal for us, but Ihe women in Ihcir homes have had some difficulty Most of Ihe problems have been one of Iwo either they don't screw (lie bands down lighlly enough or they don't use enough heal." Melskcr said Kerr had amended ils instructions io rec- ommend Hint women lighten the lids a second lime after pro- cessing to eliminate Ihe (rouble. "Whole Hatch" ihe said Ihe department had A Utah representative of Ball asked Ihe Korr Glass Manufac-jcorp., another major manufac- cd his wife. "She lost the whole balch because she didn't tighten the lids at the right he said. At Ihe same lime, White added, "oldlimcrs say the quali- ty of lids is lower than usual." Helen Sisson, California liai- son officer to the U. S. Con- sumer Product Safely Commis- sion, said she had 400 com- plaints from Los Angeles alone. "That's Doubtful" "Women have complained lhat they have had as many as jars spoiled because of im- proper she said, ad- ding thai she had taken it up wilh Kerr, which claimed "Ihe women don't know how lo use" the equipment. "Thai's Mrs. Sisson said. "Many of these complaints are from women who seem to know what they arc doing, who have been canning for years." Mrs. Sisson said she was worried about the danger of hotul ism from improperly- sealed food, but Dr. George York, a microbiologist at the University of California, said lhat, as long as Ihe food is heat- ed properly, botulism is unlikc- y. Housewives won't accept statements lhat inexperience is responsible for Ihe failures. ''Everyone I know who luis used this year's supply of Kerr lids is hopping said Cleo Davis of Ulali. "They just aren't seal- ing and it's not because they are using incorrect procedures. Peo- ple who have been canning for 30 or 40 years should know how to process fruits and vcgcta- which will help bring balanc and vitality to our economy." Ford said he has also issue an executive order cstablishin a White House Labor Management Committee com posed of eight labor leaders am eight business executives whic will advise him on major eco nomic policies. "Man to Man" He said the committee recom nendalions "will not only b' sought but given lo me man ti nan and face !o face." He said John Dunlop, a Har yard university economics pro fessor, would serve as commit, tee coordinator. Another action announced by Ford is the appointment of Al- bert Rees, a professor of eco- nomics at Princeton, to aired the newly-established Council or Wage and Price Stability, which congress created at Ford's re- quest. Ford said he will send congress a plan for action to keep federal outlays for fiscal 1975 at or under billion. He said the administration is working on a national energy program designed to assure ad- equate internal supplies and re- New Type Ncal Ctisler, assistant attor- ney general in charge of Ihe Idaho consumer affairs agency, said he had received about 350 (Continued: Page 2, Col. 7.) duce dependence on outside sources. "At This Minnie" At this very he said, "Secretary Kissinger and Secretary Simon arc exploring with Ihcir counterparts from 'our major industrial nations a coordinated plan to cope with the world energy crisis and cco- lomic distortions." An additional appointment an- lounced by Ford was thai of L. William Seidman as assistant to Ihe President for Economic Af- 'airs. He said Seidman would :ilso be a member and executive lireclor of Ihe new Economic "olicy Board, responsible for coordinating implementation of economic policy. Ford said that in the final malysis, however, councils and lommitccs cannot win Ihe war igainsl inflation. Spirit of People "The mosl important weapon n Ihe fight against inflation is he spirit of the American pco- he said. "This spirit is no secret weapon. It is renowned ili over Ihe world." He urged the delegates and Ihe national television audience listening as well as all Ameri- cans lo .join him in becoming IntVatton-VigYiters and 'energy ivers. He said each family should draw up a list of 10 ways it can save energy and fight inflation and to exchange lists with neighbors. He would also be glad to re- ceive suggestions at the White House from individuals, he said. Participants in the conference argued earlier over which jrograms should be slashed as h e government cuts back spending to fight inflation. The defense department put in a strong bid to be spared fur- .her reductions. But two con- gressional spokesmen, one from each party, took exception. "Eyen Larger" "Were we not lo act Ash said of budget-cutting, "this ear's nearly 10 percent growth n federal expenditures would nevitably be followed by even arger growth next year and the after." Ash said he was not suggest ng any drastic slashes in im- )orlant programs. Later the de- ense department said it could land no further cuts in its fund- ig- "At the pre-summit confer- nces, we found sentiment gen- rally for budget restraint, and erlainly not for drastic slashes i all Ash said. (Eroded Power Defense Secretary Schlcsinger aid the Pentagon belt already pulled tight and the defense stablishment w a s suffering rom eroded purchasing power s much as industries or indi- iduals. "Further reductions cannot be lade in the defense budget 'ithout drastic effect on the orldwide role of Ihe U. chlcsinger said. Senator Muskie (D-Mainc) fol- 'WCd Schlesinger with the as- erlion that "Ihe defense budget one budget lhat represents a ibstantial increase over the 974 fiscal year budget." Rep. Anderson chair- an of the house Republican onfcrcnce, said he thinks the idgct can be cut billion id lhat half of thai can come .it of defense funds. Chuckle During his lOOth-birlhday in- crvicw, the sally centenarian old Ihe reporter: "If I'd mown I was going to live this ong, I'd have taken better :are of myself." cwyrhht   

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