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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 26, 1974 - Page 6

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 26, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Turnover lessens alienation very little Editorial Page Thursday, September ?6, 1974 Gumption: good word HARD-PRESSED Republicans can win this fall if "we get up our gumption." That's what Ari- zona's Congressman Rhodes, leader of house Republicans in Washington, told Iowa Republi- cans at a fund raiser the other evening in Des Moines He went 01 to explain that "gumption" was something peo- ple had in the early days of this country; that "no one knew exact- ly what it meant but you could tell people who had it they got up, got going, looked the odds in the eye and did what they set out to do." Somehow, it is difficult to accept that the people back then, including the hardy pioneers, didn't know the meaning of the word gumption. Presumably the congressman really was aiming at today's generation, which finds it a strange word if only because it. is seldom heard any more, at least in political circles. No slavery brewing By Louis Harris The Harris Survey the resignation of President Is Nixon from office, disenchantment and alienation remain high among the American people. A majority of 55 percent of the adult public still expresses disaffection with the general state of the country, down from the 590 percent high recorded a few days before Mr. Nixon's departure from office, but at the same level of a year ago in September, 1973. Here is the trend of alienation as measured by the Harris Survey periodi- cally since September) 1974 ....................................55 June ...............................................................59 September, 1973............................................ 55 1972............................................................. 49 1971............................................................. 42 1969 1968...... 1966...... Webster lists a primary and secondary meaning for the word, giving preference to "common sense, shrewdness." But in the context it was used by the con: gressman, its secondary meaning "enterprise, initiative" better served his purpose. His purpose, obviously, was to try to persuade Republicans to came out of the doldrums of Wat- ergate and "the to shake off the apathy that seems to be permeating the political at- mosphere today, and to get out On the hustings and go to work. 1 In other' words, Rhodes was urging Republicans to cheer up and get to the business of beating Democrats at the polls in Nov- ember. Republicans, he said, By Congressional Quarterly "need a lot of gumption right now." Or, to translate "enter- prise, initiative" into more common language, the party needs "a lot of get up and go" as the campaign works toward its climax. .....36 36 29 Back in less than a third of the public felt alienated from the main- stream of American life. By 1972, this number had jumped 2C points to percent. By 1972, this number had jumped 20 points to 49 percent. With the Watergate disclosures and intensified inflation, i( rose to over a majority for the first time In 1973. Then as demands for Mr. Nixon's impeachment increased this past summer, this disaffection reached a record 59 percent. With Gerald Ford's ascension to the presidency, there has been only a slight easing of the country's sense of aliena- tion, and it is still far from drawn to- gether. Any quick recovery of a'national spirit and unity simply does not appear imminent. The greatest improvement in public attitude appears to be in the belief that "the people running the country don't really care what happens to which has declined from 63 to 48 percent since last June. However, the number who feel "left nut of things going on around them" has remained at an all-time high of 32 percent. And the number who feel thai "most people with power try lo take advantage of people like yourself" has decreased only slightly, from lo 5li percent. Underlying these resulls, of course, is (he public's deep, abiding distrust of both public and private leadership, and its reluctance to believe the pronounce- ments of people in high places. Evi- dence of this skepticism is reflected in the high 77 percent of the people who still believe thai "the rich get richer and the poor gel down only 2 poinls from 79 percenl in June. Earlier this month, a national cross- section of adults were asked: "I want to read you some things some people have told us they have fell from lime lo lime. Do you lend to feel or not that (read Sept. June 74 '74 73 '66 79 Rich gel richer, poor get poorer 77 Moil people witfl power try lo take advantage of people like yourself 56 60 What you think doetn't count much any moro 54 60 61 37 running country dsn't roally care wlrat hoppcmi to you 48 63 55 26 You (eel left out of thing! going on around you 32 32 29 9 X Not oiked In 1966 Those groups that feel most alienated are lower income people, those over 65 years of age, blacks and big city resi- dents, all of whom suffer most from escalating prices and rising unemploy- ment. The increased disaffection of high-In- come and college-educated. groups stems from the collapse in leadership credibility. With the emergance of the Ford administration, some hope existed for a rapid turnaround in American morale. But after the pardon of President Nixon, which greatly dampened the country's spirits, it now seems almost certain that restoring national confidence and eradi- cating this pervading sense of disaffec- tion will be a long hard route. Cnlcaoo Trlbune-Now York News Syndicate vl' i-y-.y.-; Should congress vote Nixon for transition? By James J. Kilpatrick WASHINGTON Charles McC. Mathias, the senior senator from Maryland, is catching a touch of the old higli life these days from Liberty Lobby. The senator's sin is that he has been a Bilderberger, not once but several times, and to be a Bilderberger is to be a "Secret Conspirator." Several weeks ago, Liberty Lobby published an ad in the Washington pa- pers, asking the senator what he was hid- ing. "With all due said Liberty Lobby, in a lone of voice suggesting little respect is due, "we find it strange that you refuse to disclose any information concerning your trip to the Bilderberg meeting in Megeve, France, April 19-21, 1974." Liberty Lobby went on to ask what was discussed at the secret meeting, and to remind Mathias that his loyalty lies with his Maryland constituents, not with international bankers. asked Lib- erty Lobby, putting a little spin on the ball, "do you feel your senatorial oath of office is superseded by your oath to the The senior senator from Maryland, now up for re-election, doubtless can take care of himself. He is a high-toned gent, civilized and soft-spoken, with a voting record that runs from medium to meaium-rare. His response to Liberty Lobby is to raise a defense of innocence by association, or maybe fuzzy-wuzzy- ness by association. Many of his best friends, he says, are Bilderbergers. And so what? These Bilderberg meetings have been going on since 1954, when a group of global thinkers gathered at the Hotel do Bilderberg in Ooostebeek, Holland. Ordinarily about 100 participants arc invited. They include politicians, bank- ers, industrialists, journalists and acade- mics from Europe, Canada and the Unit- ed States. In the jaundiced view of my friends of the Far-out Right, their purpose is to promote the Secret Conspiracy that soon will enslave us all. Senator Mathias says thi-ir purpose is to discuss problems con- fronting the Atlantic community. Last spring they talked about inflation, ener- gy and natural resources. Tht- Secret Conspiracy, as is well known, operates from several locations. Henry Kissinger is manager in charge of the Washington office. David Rockefeller runs the branch in New York. The Bild- erbergers have the European franchise. (Actually the North American Conspira- cy is in charge of the Council of "Foreign Relations, which secretly manipulates governments through a small clique of power-mad billionaire bankers whose goal is world domination through a new socialist order.) knows this. Being a Secret Conspirator used to be an exclusive kind of thing. To judge James J. Kilpatrick from a rollcall of recent Bilderberg meelings, Ihe Conspiracy is gelling a lil- lle down al Ihe heels. Among Ihe participants over the years, one finds such United Slates sena- tors as Edward Brooke; Clifford Case, Frank Church, Ralph Flanders, William Fulbright, Fred Harris, Bourkc Hick- cnlooper, Henry M. Jackson, Jacob .lav- its, Gale McGee, Mike Monroney, Hugh Scoll and John Sparkman. Most of Ihese are sinister types, of which anything could be believed, bul Hickenlooper? The lale senalor from Iowa? Say il ain't so. Gerald Ford has been a Bilderber- ger. So have Congressmen Richard Boll- ing, John Brademas, Chel Hnlifield, Peter Frelinghuysen, Danle Fascell, F. Bradford Morse, Henry Reuss and Brooks Hays. Nol surprisingly, column- isl Joe Krafl is a Bilderberger; no plol lo promote slavery is beyond Mr. Kraft. Barry Bingham of the Louisville Courier- Journal also is a Secret Consoirator. And Scotty Reslon of Ihe New York Times. And Bill Moyers. How do you like that? Moyers! Well, all I can say is that the Bild- erbergers never have asked me to their annual convention. I. am just as ready lo plot, conspire, manipulate, dominate, control and enslave the world as Scotly Reston or Barry Bingham. If Liberty Lobby would just give me a lillle en- dorsement, maybe 1 could caddy for Mathias next year. Washington Star Syndicate Arguing in vain Finds minds fixed By Jim Rebig 'UOW TO argue and win" ethics pro or con, right or wrong it didn't mailer. As long as there was a good argument lo be had. Jhal was the headline over a ad in The Wail Street Journal of- fering a new hoik entitled, "The Art of For just plus 50 cents for handling, Ihe reader was promised a basic guide lo spoiling "the prejudices, emotionalism and inappropriate analo- !'ifs in the other fellow's argument." Ten years ago I would have snapped i! up. Fresh from college and armed with a course on logic, I was an argu- rncnlalive fool, swaggering about cock- .tail lounges and coffeehouses just plead- for someone to knock a syllogism off my shoulder. Poised like a praying mantis to pounce upon and devour every nun scqiiitnr, fallacy and generality. Religion, politics, philosophy, sports, I never kept a record of how many won or lost, but I did keep (rack of how many minds my argumenls changed: none. And how many friends they earned: again, zero. I finally concluded that (he only thing worth arguing about is who picks up the check. Today, you can walk right up to me and beg the question and slap me around with a faulty premise until I'm blue in the brain. I won't raise a single analogy in my defense. You think what you want. I'll 'hink what I want. Let's not argue. Let's be friends. WASHINGTON The Ford admin- istralion's requesl for to pay for former Presidenl Nixon's expen- ses during his firsl year oul of office has slirred up a hornet's nest on Capitol Hill. The funds are being sought under two statues: the presidential transilion acl of 1963 and Ihe former Presidents act of 1958. Under the transition law, 000 is authorized to cover expenses of the new president and former Presidents for a six-month period. Ford, who is not asking for his half of the appropriation, has requested 000 covering 11 months for such expenses as safeguarding files and tapes from the Nixon presidency and providing equip- ment and staff for answering mail. The General Services Administralion (GSA) argues il will cost another to complete Ihe Iransition in six months rather than 11. Another has been requested for such items as Nixon's annual pension office space and staff, furnish- ings and cquipmcnl. The proposal is running inlo heavy opposilion as it makes its way through congress. Much of the criticism stems from widespread anger and frustration over Ford's decision to pardon Nixon for issue follow: any crimes he might have commitled while in office. Opposing views on bolh sides of the Proposed Nixon August 9, 1974 to June 30, year Personnel compensation Office of presidential p THE ADMINISTRATION argues that the funds would serve two impor- tant needs, which congress acknowledged when it passed the two laws; the personal welfare of the former President and the orderly conclusion of his official affairs. ject to subpoena in the upcoming Wat- ergate trials; "ic GSA has worked out an elaborate security arrangement includ- ing deposit of the boxes in a locked vault, to be guarded around-the-clock for five years. says Arthur F. Sampson, admin- istrator of the GSA. "The stature and special experience of the presidency follow an individual from dial office, and these characteristics make him a figure of public attention and a figure in public service." In recognizing this "special role" of a former President, Sampson noted, has authorized such benefits as a pension, office space, staff, travel funds and other support "so that he can maintain a'creative presence as an ad- viser in national and international public life." Moreover, argued framers of the legislation, it would be a national dis- grace to allow a former President who was not independently wealthy to suffer economic hardships. While funds under the former Pres- idents act would provide for Nixon's per- sonal well-being, the requested under the transiton act would give Nixon until June 30, 1975, to lie up the loose ends of his five-plus years in office. To a suggestion thai the transition budget be geared to six months instead of II, Sampson argued that the cosls for that would be "far greater." A six-month job would be a "physical he said, no matter how much money was appropriated. A major item planned under the proposal is for transporting the voluminous cartons of Nixon's files and tapes from Washington, D.C., to a site near the former President's San Clum- entc, Calif., home, and for security ar- rangements for the material. Since much of the material is suh- forum Top issue cited To the Editor: The similarity between Richard Nixon and John Culver in the area of campaign financing is incredible. John Culver has accepted thousands of dol- lars from a special-interest group: or- ganized labor. He voted to continue The gazette's opinion Ax-swing necessary TTiVEN IF the whole impeachment buildup had not JUjinuddied Richard Nixon's exit from the White House, a taxpayer tab of nearly million for his transition out would seem inordinately high. The sullied circumstances of his exit and the public mood nn what is simply fair in such a case make il alto- gether unacceptable. Few dispute that sizable expenses follow from a presidency's closeout legitimately even one beclouded as the recent change was. No one can contend supportably that such expenses ought to be a burden on the man who held the office. Hardly any- body would begrudge a reasonable funding of Mr. Nixon's transition from the nation's highest office to civilian life. But more money than most of us earn in a lifetime? Including some for staff help at salaries as high as a year? At levels that would average a month, according to Senator Montoya, when former President Johnson's transi- tion-spending averaged only For a comforta- bly pensioned Chief Executive who, had he nnt. re- signed, unquestionably would have been removed through impeachment? Whose being "pardoned" since departing doubtless saved him from immense additional expenses that the trial process would have brought? It is inconceivable that most Americans could possibly consider as anywhere near a fair and legitimate burden on themselves for the Nixon change of scene. For congressmen who fail to pare it drastically, the people's wrath is apt to come down hard. WILL accord every considera- have been receiving from their conslitu- V tion lo Ihe former President" enls about the requesl. says Sen. Joseph M. Montoya "But we don't want to indulge in any ex- Sen. Mark 0. Hatficld's (R-Ore.) re- cesses." Thai position is mild compared to ports that his mail and telephone calls some of the advice members of congress from constituents is running "99 and 99- one-hundredths percent" in opposilion lo furnishing food stamps to labor strikers for four more years. The September issue of The Nation's Business reveals thai COPE the polilical arm of the AFL-CIO gives Culver an 82 rating for favorable voles. He likes lo compare his voting record H. R. (iross got a 4. Nixon was accused of raising price supports for milk producers because of campaign donalions, and Culver has done Ihe same Ihlng by his voles lo ben- efit a special interest group. What's the difference? Wouldn't John Culver be a little more credible when he tells us almost daily that he is a vanguard of reform if he set an example without having lo wait (or a law to keep him in line? I Ihink special-interest money in the Culver-Stanley race is THE issue in (he aftermath of the Watergate revelations. Klalne E. Smith Route I, Monliccllo Fast service Trt Ihe Kdilor; I noticed the letter of Frances Gun- (Forum, Sept. 18 commend- ing Tom Riley for his assistance to her congress allowing all of the requesl. "Many thought the Nixon admin- islralion was a costly Halfield says. "And they ask why addilional mon- ey is needed particularly when Prcs- idenl Ford is asking the nation to hold down spending. Hatfield says most of his constituents regard (he requesl as "un- necessary and extravagant." Many members of congress recall the millions of dollars spent by the eov- crnmenl on Nixon's home at San Clcm- enle and Key Biscaync, Fla. Nixon would receive more under the administration's proposal than any other former President. The request is more than doubled the that went to for- mer President Lyndon B. Johnson. According to Ihe GSA, (he increase is due partly lo Ihe expense of (he securi- ty arrangement, partly to the fact that Johnson completed some of his transition activities while slili in the While House, and partly lo inflation. The security provisions Ihemselves, which hinge on passage of the request, also are .being se- verely criticized. Under an agreement signed by Nixon and Sampson, Nixon will donale his tapes and documents to the National Archives in 1979 on conditon that lie can destroy any tapes he believes could in- jure or harass anyone. Another conditon is that all the tapes will be destroyed in 1984 or on Nixon's death if he dies before then. I'm concerned whether the people are gelling Iheir money's says Rep. Tom Bcvill Bevill and others say Ihe agreement provides no assurance thai Ihe tapes will ever be available lo the public or historians in obtaining a passport to fly to Ireland for her father's funeral. This type of service is a way of life for Tom Itlley. Several years ago, my wife was discharged due lo a mixup in personnel records of a former employer I called Senator Riley and expected Ihe notes he made on my call to wind up in his waslebaskel. Instead, within (wo hours my wife was reinstated at her job nml Im's been working there since. I'm not a Repub- lican, but I Ihink Tom KMoy Is the per- son who car, represent everybody. Dunne Klsbnry Route 2. Cedar liapids   

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