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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 24, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Objectives Cited Cited For New Program At Linn-Mar "Everyone in an activity. and an activity for is one of the objective of Linn- Mar high school's new in- tramural profipmi. Intramural Director Wayne Miller said the program will be varied, including volley- ball, table tennis, bowling, track day and swim meets. .The program will be held ev- ery Wednesday after school. About 40 high school girls will begin league volleyball Wednesday. This sport will continue for six weeks, fol- lowed by basketball for hoys. The new program is de- signed to involve the student who is not participating in interscholastic athletics. However those students now playing varsity football, for example, will be able to par- ticipate in the intramural program when the football season ends. "Through this friendly competition, we hope to build school pride, spirit and good school explained Miller. The intramural program is looking for volunteers to help officiate and supervise the various activities. Anyone interested in assisting is urged lo contact Miller at the high school 377-7373. Homecoming at Linn-AAar Slated Homecoming is set for Ihis week at Marion high school. Activities get under way Thursday evening with a bonfire and tug-of-war at 7 p.m. in the high school park- ing lot. Events Friday include the homecoming assembly al p.m. in the gym and the deco- rating of the field and gym for the game and dance, respec- tively, at 2. The homecoming queen will be crowned during the half- time of the Marion-West Dela- ware football game which starts al 8. Sophomores play at (i. Final event of the home- coming weekend is the dance Saturday from to p.m. in the school gym. C.R. Man Charged In Marion Accident Charges of reckless driving have been filed by Marion pol- ice against Randy K. Coe, 21, of 2724 Meariowbrook drive SE, Cedar Rapids, as the re- sult of a mishap early Sunday in which two Marion youths were hurl. Coe is to appear Monday in magistrate's court mi the charge. Listed in good condition at SI. Luke's hospital are John Hunt, Fifth avenue, and .loo Schiipanilx, McGowan boulevard. Both are Hi. The incident took place in a field in the southwestern por- tion of the city. No other de- tails were available. Present Awards Cub Scout Pack 72 met Monday at Washington school and awards were given to Karl Lauben- gayer, Gary Bond, Robert SIrempke, Pat Lammers, David Durivage. Allen House. Richard Panek, Jeff Seemen. Malt llefel, Kurt Osbiirn. Brad Perkins, Eric Johnson. Jeff Kramer, Mike Simpson. Richie Strempke, Mike Can- noy, Chris Kalous, Allen See- men. Kenny McCleary, Scott Wilson, John Imgrund, Darren Long, Mark Willmsen, Mark Wright, Scott Painter.. Kirk Glessncr, Lance Bis- singer, Daren Vigcn and Mike Decious. New assortment pierced car- rings. Ray's YMl'A Wednesday's ac- tivity schedule al the Marion YMCA is: Non-aqualic -pre- school gymnastics II a.m., women's volleyball I p.nr, gymnastics 4 and 5, adult open gym 7, bridge lessons 7: pool -.school lessons !l a.m. and p.m.. lire-school les- sons anil I. adult open swim noon and youth Ics sons swim ieimi 11.30. (.'uses heard Monday magistrate's court were: Marlene M Dorsch, Ull Ejfjhth street SE Cedar Rapids, Chris It' Bcrggren, 382 Crandall drive NE. Cedar Rapids, Slop sign -Stephen J. Steepleton, 1223 Fourth avenue, Traff- ic signal Kenneth R Cornwell, 711 Thirty-f'mrlh street, No driver's license Ronald II. Lalhrop, Fourth avenue, Disturb- ing the peace Lloyd Henderson, 1425 Eighth ave- nue, W.E. Mohr Dies, Formerly of Marion Walter E. Mohr, 07, a form- er Marion resident, dLd unex- pectedly Thursday al his home in Irving, Texas. Born Feb. 3, 1907, near Losl Nalion, he was married June 29, 1931, lo Lillian A. Reink- ing. Mr. Mohr was a fire in- surance underwriter for 43 years being employed by In- terocean Reinsurance Co. and the United Fire and Casualty firm of Cedar Rapids. He retired two years ago from Millers Mutual Insur- ance Co. of Fort Worth, Texas. He was a member of St. Ste- vens Presbyterian church in Irving. Surviving in addition lo his wife are three sons, Cdr. Richard W., Bethesda, Md.; LI. William B., Fort Meade, Md., and Thomas' E., Dallas; a sister, Ruth Guyer, Ma- quokela, and Iwo brothers, Alvin, Monmuulh, and How- ard, Cedar Rapids. Services were held al St. Stevens church Saturday with burial at Smitntown cemetery near Lost Nation. (Jive Awards Cub Seoul Pack 58 met Monday at Emer- son school "and presented awards lo Steven Whilson, Robert Mead, Jeff Forbes, Matt Grundy, Mike McCul- lough. Ixmie Vaske, Jeff Clrawe, Brad Dalisman. Jeff Hennessey, Mark Hennessey, Brian Kelly. Mike Carew, Pat Collins, (iuy Wasliburn, Rick Dorff, Lee Wasliburn. David Kelly. Dean Chapman and Sieve Morgan. Weekend Guests Mr. and Mrs. Don Bowdish of DCS Moines and Dorothy Britten of Mt. Vernon were weekend guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. liosdish and Jeanne. 717 Sixth avenue. Buy House Mr. and Mrs. Robert II. Gore' have pur- chased the house at 2770- Norlhview drive from Mr. and Mrs. Donald llaugen. Posses- sion was given Sepl. 1-1. Sale was made by the Thomas E. McGowan Real Estate firm. Fun and games every Wed- nesday night at American Legion Hall, Marion. Public invited. Adv. Awards Given Cub Seoul Pack 185 mel Monday at the Linn County REC buiding and presented awards to John Calahan. Randy Ditch. Darin Laughridge, Jeff Hansel, Jeff Webster, Jeff Chrislcnsen. Chris Lent, David Deeney. Mike Lempke, Keith Miller, Greg Hansel, Scott Reid. Curtis Hall. Bruce Hansel, Harold Odeen and Doug Kolstad. Hickory smoked barbecued ribs, shrimp and chicken. Served Wednesdays Slick ncy's Scoreboard. Adv. Sol Open House The annual Vernon junior high school open house is sel for Thursday al p.m. i'arenls will have the opportunity lo follow their student's daily class schedule Teachers will discuss the program of stud- ies Need garden tools'.' Cheek today's classified ads for the best values anywhere! MEN-WOMEN Are you looking for a job in Communications? If you quolify, wo'll poy you S32A. 10 a monlh (Ixiforci doduelioi i (porn Communications. Join Hip pr wlio'vi? joinml Army. Coll Army Opportunities 365-8601 3712 lit Avo. N.E. An tqunl Oppoitunity fmployrr Unidentified Animal Sighted Near Pike's Peak MCOKRGOH-Ari animal, which some persons believe might have been a cougar, was seen Sunday night neai Pike's Peak state park. Scott Slaughter, 30, reported his nephew, Junior Slaughter 17, was alone at his family's home near the park when he saw an animal about 100 feet from the house. The animal growled for over an hour. Frightened, the youth called his uncle, who arrived with a shotgun. The elder Slaughter approached the animal, which he described as about four feel long, one-and-a half to two feet in height and tan in color. He said the animal had a cat-like appearance, but was unable lo identify it. He called McGregor Police Chief Frank Mullarky, and although the animal had dis- appeared when he arrived, a dead opposum was found in the woods wilh teeth marks in its neck. The opposum was taken to Park Ranger Paul Swanson, who has transferred it to an Iowa conservation official for examination. The two Slaughters could not find the animal in a Mon- day search. Last spring, animals des- cibed as cougars were report- ed in the area. Report Winthrop Rowley Breakins Over Weekend INDEPENDENCE The Buchanan county sheriff's off- ice is investigating several incidents which occurred at Rowley and Winlhrop over the past weekend. At Rowley, burglars, after throwing a piece of concrete block through the plate glass window of the front door at Boelter's Appliance, left with three TV sets and numerous jackets and gloves. The breakin was discovered Monday morning and appar- ently occured sometime over the weekend. According to the sheriff's office vandals were busy at Winllirop sometime Sunday night. A truck was driven from the Beck-Shriver Kquip- mi'nl (.'o. properly and parked in the lawn of the East Buch- anan school at VVinthrup. Another pickup truck was driven two blocks away from the firm and found parked. Both vechicles had been left at the equipment company wilh keys in the ignition. At the Great Plains Supply Lumber Co., Winlhrop, sev- eral incidents occured. A fork- lift truck was driven through a gate on the property, gas was siphoned from the truck, several fire extinguishers were emptied into radiators of some trucks, and the intercom was found broken off the wall in some buildings. All incidents remain under investigation. Youth Dies of Injuries Received in Crash GUTTKNBEHG-Knnald Klavitter. Hi, of rural Gut- tenbcrg, the son of Milton Klavitter, died early Monday of injuries he received Sept. 17' when he lost control of the pick uj) truck he was driving on a county road two miles north and three east of Coles- burg. lie had been transferrcd- from Hie local hospital to a Rochester, Minn. hospital where lie died. This marks the forth fatali- ty for Clayton county this year. Coggon Closing COGGON-The Coggon ele- mentary school was closed Monday and Tuesday due lo boiler malfunctioning, but classes will resume Wednes- day. DIIIVK SAFKI.Y Your United Way At Work "I'm Pam Schneider and your United Way contribution is helping me. I am a Junior Girl Scout. Through the Girl Scout program and budget work, I have learned many things about service in the arts, the home, and out-of-doors. We made pine cone wreaths as Christmas presents for our parents, Christmas cards for the children in Mercy hospitU. and de- livered food baskets lo the elderly. We've also ht-Ipud al our FFSA Ice Cream Social, participated in the United Nations program at Coe, and given a program for the children al the Linn County day care center. "Outdoors, we've cooked, hiked, camped, picked up trash and litter and come to love nature's beauly and pledged our- selves lo its conservation. While we are singing, laughing, playing and working, we are learning how to he useful Scouts and citizens. Won't you help us to help others? Give the United Way Thanks to you it's working through your United Way Campaign pledge. Qualifications Are Cited In Urban Renewal Suit IOWA CITY The opening day of testimony in a suit for an injunction to slop Iowa Cit- y's downtown urban renewal project centered mainly on the qualifications of the plaintiffs. The suit, being tried in the University of Iowa law school building, contends the envi- ronmental impact statement filed in conjunction with the project is inadequate. Federal law requires im- pacl statements be filed for all projects financed by federal funds. The statement is to consider environmental fac- tors and alternatives. Environmental Statement The attorney for Citizens for Environmental Action, and the Iowa Student Public In- leresl Research Group (IS- PIRG) are contending the cit- y's environmental statement does not lake inio account available mass transit or aspects of the project's financ- ing. The first witness called by the plaintiffs was John (Skip) I.ailncr. a representative of Cilixens for Environmental Action, and has been active in 1SPIRG. Lailner contended there should have been more consid- eration of a multiple devel- oper concept, as well as em- phasis on mass transit. Harassment In cross examination, a city attorney termed Laitner "part of pasl and present harass- ment of this project." Laitner was accused of not having formal training in the envi- ronmental and urb.'in planning fields. The plaintiffs also called Thomas Pogue, associate professor of economics al the I', of I., to testify (in an al- leged lack of cost benefit anal- ysis in the cily's environ- mental statement. rogue was admitted as an expert witness. The city, however, sharply attacked the qualifications of George Brown, a professional trans- porlation consultant. The defense contended Brown's expertise dnes not include urban transportation planning. Judge William Stewart allowed Brown lo testify, bill not as an expert witness. Benton County Board Is Asked To Aid SEATS VINTON The SEATS program in Benton county is asking for help from the board of supervisors to continue funds for the program. A meeting has been set for Wednesday between the board and SEATS personnel from the overseeing Area X office. The supervisors are being asked lo try and help the bus system, as one Jfaccl of the campaign to round up the nec- essary funds. About 60 people, mostly eld- erly riders of the SEATS bus, attended a meeting in Newhall lo hear the grant problems explained by Perry Hummel, a member of the Benton county SEATS board, and Area X SEATS Coordinator Rick Brass. According to Hummel, some means will be found to keep the bus rolling for Benton senior citizens. About 150 of the estimated people over the age of 60 in Benlon County have pur- chased memberships in SEATS, allowing them to ride for a 25 cent fare. Funds from the grant which started the transportation program for area elderly, including the program in Benton county, are due to expire Oct. 1. Negligence Is Charged in Suit TOLEDO-Mike Reuman. of Traer, has filed suit in Tama county district court seeking in damages against each of three defendants and against them jointly and charges them wilh neglig- ence in the construction of a storm sewer. In his petition, Reuman charges that Traer, Elmer Miller of Traer, hired by the city to relocate a sewer, and Cannon-Peterson, Inc.. Reinbeck. were ncgligenl in building the sewer which broke last June, with the wa- ter pressure causing his base- ment wall to cave in. The sum sought from the ci- ty would be the cost of remov- ing and rebuilding (he menl walls, while the dam- sought from the con- struction firm result from its failure to cross-brace the basement walls. ON THIS DATE in 1941, in World war II, Allied govern- ments pledged adherence to the Atlantic Charier. Violation Telephone Michael Dooley 377-8081 The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tues., Sept. 24, By Oswald James .lacony The old adage, "Then; arc none so blind as they who will not see" certainly applies in bridge. Kast came lo us wilh long story about how his partner let South make an ovcrtrick at three notrump. He described his partner's crime as follows: "South won the spade lead in his hand and led a heart to dummy's queen. Then he proceeded to rattle off five club tricks while my partner was obliging enough to chuck three diamonds. "Next South cashed the high spades, threw my partner in wilh a diamond and eventually made his tenth trick with the king of hearts." We didn't bother to ask East if he had contributed anything to the debacle, because he had already heard from West. It seems East had discarded two hearts and a diamond while the clubs were parading. East's first discard should have been a spade and his second discard another spade. That would have told West that he could throw spades with complete safety. As it was poor West had been afraid that South held four hearts and that he, West, just had to hang on to all his cards in that suit. MOUTH (D) A A82 VQ97 ,18 A Q J !l 3 WliST 4 J 10 4 VAJIO A 10 5 2 6 -I SOUTH KQ7 Q76 KAST 4653 10 5 East-West vulnerable West North East South 14 Pass 3 NT. Pass Opening Pass 2 NT. Pass Pass The bidding has been: West Pass Pass 24 North East South Pass Pass Pass 'You, South, hold: K843 VA2 What do you do now? A F'ass. Your partner lias heard your strong bids. TODAY'S QUESTION Instead of bidding four spades your partner has bid four dia- monds over your four clubs. What do you do now? Answer Tomorrow Bids Let for Addition To Lutheran Home STRAWBERRY POINT are scheduled lo be let for the new addition lo the Strawberry Point Lu- theran home which will be equipped with a new kitchen, therapy room, dining room, and chapel and will add 18 more beds to the present structure. The home now has 115 full and part-time employes. The final drive for this project will begin Sunday. Plans call for construction lo begin in the spring. Cohen Urges Ford To Take Steps For Accountability DES MOINES (UPI) Cit- ing what he called the "gener- al decline in President Ford's the executive vice-president of Common Cause said ths new president must take five steps to insure accountability and openess in federal government. David Cohen, of Washing- ton, D.C., was in Iowa this weekend to moderate a campaign debate between U.S. senate candidates Rep. John Culver (D-Iowa) and state Rep. Dave Stanley (R-Mus- "Given the general decline in President Ford's credibili- ty, there are some very imme- diate reform steps that Pres- ident Ford should Cohen said. "They would have the salutary of putting flesh on the president's early and welcome statements on openness." lie said the first of the five steps should be an executive order requiring the logging of outside contacts hy executive branch officials and (he regis- tration of lobbyists and clients involved in executive branch lobbying. Cohen said the second step would be the signing of the campaign finance reform bill when it emerges from con- gressional conference. Cohen said the president should "issue executive orders that overhaul our classifica- tion system, strenglhen Hie enforcement of freedom of information and place strict limits on the use of executive privilege." The last two steps call for presidential support of legisla- tion establishing a special prosecutor lo investigate and prosecure public officials' misconduct, and, a pledge to "lake Hie appointments of jus- tice department officials and U.S. attorneys out of partisan politics." 5SE EES Optometrist 8 Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted Contact Lenses By appointment only 395-6356 Closed Sun. ,tnd Mnn. Lindalc Plaza Just taste and you may never go back to your usual whisky. Windsor is the only Canadian made wilh hardy Western Canadian grain, with water from glacier-fed springs, and aged in ihe clear dry air of the Canadian Rockies.   

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