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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 23, 1974 - Page 6

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 23, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Congress gains ground, still stands short Editorial Page Monday, Seplembor 23, 1974 Hughes papers to Iowa U, CONGRATULATIONS to Sena- tor Hughes of Iowa for setting an example for other public offi- cials with his decision to turn over materials he has accumulat- ed in public office to the Universi- ty of Iowa library. The collection will be a verita- ble gold mine of background in- formation for historians and students of Iowa history. It will contain letters, copies of speech- es, documents, pictures, record- ings and other memorabilia the senator has piled up during 16 years of public service four as a member of the commerce commission, six as governor and six in the U.S. senate. That span covers an era which saw Iowa begin to modernize its antiquated state government structure, thanks to Harold Hughes who, from his first day on the commerce commission, re- jected the idea that there could be no change "because we've always done it this way." For the most part, moderniza- tion hinged on restoring to Iowa the basic, fundamental concept of majority rule through a truly rep- resentative legislature. Hughes, against the advice of virtually all of his advisers, put his neck on the line as governor in favor of a fair and honest plan of apportion- ing legislative seats. Once that was acomplished, it was possible to bring about other necessary changes. To Hughes also goes much of the credit for establishment of the area school system, with its fine community colleges and vocation- al-technical training courses. These are only two of his many accomplishments. Presum- ably his public papers will pro- vide a vast background on all of them. Unlike Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon, among others, Harold Hughes does not seek to benefit in any way by giving possession of public papers to the university where they will be available to the public which elected him to office. "I do not consider this a he explained, in announcing his decision. "So far as I am con- cerned, these papers properly be- long to the people of Iowa, and it was always my plan to place them permanently in an official state repository where they would be in safekeeping but available to the public." Well said. Fiscal restraint rejected S IF THE JOB of slowing idown inflation were not tough enough already, President Ford apparently must devise retardants guaranteed not to lose congress- men any votes. How else can one explain the senate's rejection (64 to 35) of Mr. Ford's proposal to defer for 90 days an October pay increase for 3.5 million federal employes? As the President explained the proposal last month, the saving of some million in wages would not single-handedly cure the country's economic ills. But at least the move would demonstrate that the federal government aims to carry out its promise to hold down the national budget. Senate approval of the pay-increase de- ferment would "set an example of restraint for the rest of the na- said Mr. Ford. When they axed the idea last Thursday, certain senators not- ably Wyoming Democrat Gale McGree wrote it off as "a gimmick, a cosmetic approach." (Iowa Senator Clark voted for the pay deferment; Senator Hughes sided with the majority.) The de- scription is grossly inaccurate. By delaying pay adjustments for one of the largest groups of employes in the country, the federal govern- ment could have inspired similar restraint in private industry. Granted, the recommended withholding of raises would have been a keen disappointment for governmental employes (includ- ing 2.2 million military person- even though civilian federal job holders' average yearly earn- ings exceed private industry's norm by some But that is the very point of the Ford administration's first initial economic thrust: If inflation is to be checked, sacrifices must be made. The senate's rejection of Ford's fiscal restraint pitch sug- gests that no sacrifice will be tougher to achieve than prying congress loose from its cherished political expedience. An ex- congressional warhorse himself, the President realizes the strength of that bond. Judiciary unit's good work helped By Louis Harris Tho Norm Survey ALTHOUGH S3 percent of the Amer- ican people give the congressional impeachment proceedings high marks, the over-all standing of congress remains negative with the public by a margin of 54-38 percent. The public is basically looking for some initiative from congress in control- ling inflation and in bringing (he econ- omy out of its slump. Up to now it has found such action largely lacking. The over-all rating of congress was measured in a survey of a nationwide cross-section of households conduct- ed earlier this month, in which people were asked: "How would you rato (he job congress is doing this year excellent, pretty good, only fair or Sept., 1974 July Jan. 1973 1970 1969 1968 1967 1966 1965 1964 1963 POM. 38 29 21 38 26 34 46 38 49 64 59 33 54 64 69 45 63 54 46 55 42 26 33 60 Not sure 7 10 17 7 9 10 Since January, the number of people who give congress a good-excellent (pos- itive) job rating has nearly doubled from 21 to 38 percent. However, a per- sistent majority of 54 percent continues to be critical of the congressional per- formance this year. The Harris Survey has measured public reaction to congress every year since 1963, and only in the period of 1964-1967 did a plurality or majority of the public give a positive assessment of the house and senate. Back then, of course, a Democratic congress had a honeymoon with newly-elected Presi- dent Lyndon Johnson and passed a spate of legislation in the areas of social and human rights. Over most of the last 10 years, the public has viewed congress as having no better than a mediocre to poor record. It was during this period that the execu- tive power of the White House was growing, chiefly at the expense of congress. One of the most significant develop- ments of 1974 was the reassertion of congressional power. But these latest results show thai the public feels congress still has a long way to go to redress the balance between the legisla- tive and executive branches envisaged by the founding fathers when they wrote the Constitution. During the course of 1974, public re- spect for the way congress was handling Ihe impeachment proceedings agi'inst former President Nixon rose sharply. People were asked: "Now let me ask you some specifics about Ihe job congress is doing. How would you rate congress on handling the impeachment proceedings forme: President Nixon excellent, pretty good, only fair or Posi- Nega- Not five live sure Septembei July January 59 27 37 65 7] 18 There is no doubt (hat (he decisive- ness and conduct of the house judiciary committee set well with (he American people. Almost all of the gains regis- forum 'cm films To the Editor: We are writing to protest the presen- tation of such violent and deplorable films as "Born Innocent" (Sept. 9 on NBC) via the television medium. In our opinion, such productions severely hamper the general public's righls and privileges to view malerial that is posi- tively beneficial, pertinent, informative and pleasantly enterlaining. As teachers (at Wright elementary school) we feel that movies such as "Born Innocent" are in definite conflict with educational and suitable moral goals and cannot be justifiably deemed supportive of healthy, virluous atti- tudes. The film's very scheduling during prime time denied many the opportuni- ty to view this network, as it was not aimed toward the young or those who sought something enlightening or crea- tive. Relatedly, its momentary fore- warning of suggested audience restric- lions hardly seemed an adcquale dis- couragement for viewing. In surveying a wide variety of per- sons who witnessed at least a sufficient substanlial portion of the film, we find lhal we are far from being a minority in these beliefs. We, therefore, support any formal or personal attempts by others lo prohibil further presenlations of such meritless and base caliber from lelevi- sion. Cindy Lundine 2066 Eastern boulevard SE Mary Jo Kelly 1300 Oakland road NE Objectionable To the Editor: I am writing concerning the movie ads section of The Gazette. I feel Ihe pictures and words used in advertising X- and R-rated movies are objectionable and in bad taste. We recently received a copy of The Daily Report, Ontario, Calif. The movie ad page of Ihis paper was done in a much better way (not all the pictures and wordy I feel The Gazette should refuse ads for X-rated movies, adult book stores and massage parlors. If H-raled movies are advertised, only Ihe litle should be shown. I feel The should sland forth in setting good moral standards for our community and not be a lool used by ex- ploiters to undermine the decency of our town. Also, concerning Ihe eyesore al Ihe corner of Sixleenth avenue and Sixth slreet SW (Danish Book pas- sers-by must think we have a real cool town, a good place lo rear children. Likewise the garbage shown consis- tently at our drive-in thealers: Why not a drive-in thai shows family I join the others who are protesling Ihe showing of "Born Innocent" on TV. I also protest the ads for R-rated movies shown on television al such inappro- priate limes. Ed Aubrey IOCS Eisenhower street, Hiawatha LETTERS The Gazette's editorial page welcomes readers' opinions, subject these guidelines: length limit; 400 words. One letter per writer every 30 days. All may bo condensed and edited without charging meaning. None published anonymously. Writer's telephone number (not printed) should follow name, address and readable handwritten signature to help authenticate. Content! deal more with issues and events than per- sonalities. No poetry. The view will be beautiful from the top' (oral by congress this year can be traced to the committee's deliberate and fair investigation and its historic votes, witnessed on television by the public. But Ihere has been no perceptible rise of public confidence in the job congress has done with Ihe economy. People were asked: "How would you rote congress on (read list) excellent, pretty good, only fair or Posi- Mega- Not tive live sure Keeping economy healthy September U 80 6 July 12 82 6 January 13 80 7 Handling taxes, spending September 12 81 7 July 8 85 7 January XX X Controiimg inflation September 10 85 5 July 7 88 5 January 6 88 6 asked in January There is little doubt llml congress receives as much blame for Ihe current state of the economy as any other major Publisher's prune-out American institution luday. Pc-oplo are fed up with high prices, sluggish em- ployment and high interest rates, and congress will not regain majority con- fidence unless and until it acts as deci- sively on inflation as it did on the im- peachment proceedings. When it comes to a kind of bottom line on congress the pivotal question of "inspiring confidence in govern- ment" the public's rating is still neg- ative by better than 2 to 1: Nega- tive 63 75 82 Not sure September 31 July 18 Januory 10 The number of people who- feel congress is now inspiring confidence in government has tripled up from 10 to 31 percent since January. But to achieve majority public appnnal, thu house and senate must continue lo make the strides in popularity they have from IDIil! to the present. Clearly, the job of restoring faith in government has just begun in this country. Chlcogo Tribune-New York News Svnrflcote Contributors to low estate reviewed By Roscoe Drummond WASHINGTON Why congress' Image suffers: 1. Because congress makes different rules for Itself than It docs for others. Example: The senate rules committee voted to "require" vice presidential-nominee Nel- son Rockefeller to make a full public disclosure of his financial assets. Slated reason: The vice-president might have to cast a deciding vote on legislation, and congress wanted to be sure there would be no conflict of inter- "cst. But congress requires no such disclosure for its own members although they often cast deciding votes without disclosing their financial conflicts of interest. 2. Democratic critics of clemency for Richard Nixon say that Mr. Ford's deci- sion "shatters the that is, shatters the prospect of congress and the President cooperating to deal with infla- tion. Why should it? Inflation is the na- tion's greatest anxiety. Why should hon- est dissent over the pardon reduce the imperative need of Congress to work with the President to develop a biparti- san anti-inflation program? Why not put first things first? 3. The United States has been with- out a vice-president for six weeks and will be for a considerable period to come. Reason: Congress is dallying with Ihe confirmation of Nelson Rockefeller. Several influential Democratic leaders arc saying that the confirmation hear- ings cannot likely be completed by Nov- ember. Purpose: To keep Rockefeller from campaigning for Republican congres- sional candidates. No wonder the Demo- crats didn't relish the Rockefeller nom- ination. 4. Members of the house of repre- sentatives are trying to rig the new campaign spending reform to give in- cumbent congressmen an advantage over Iheir opponents. They are doing this by seeking to keep the ceiling on congressional cam- paign spending to the senate set the ceiling at Incumbent con- gressmen do not need to spend as much as challengers because they get free mailing privileges, staff aid and oilier advantages. Roscoe Drummond Desexing the language: touchy By Hoyt Gimlin ONE CAN'T be loo careful what one writes these days. Please notice that the sentence did not read: A man can't be too careful what he writes these days. That masculine noun "man" and pron- oun "he" would have exposed him to the women's equality movement as foolishly ignorant or disdainful of its aim to rid the language of sexist words and idioms. Sexist never to be confused with sexy is a word of recent vintage, an- alogous to racist, used to characterize the male chauvinist who discriminates 'on the basis of gender. Thus a person (not please) who has had their consciousness raised a notch or two has to stay on guard (never on "his" guard) whenever exercising the native tongue (never, never "his" native To aid the unwary or unreformed, the McGraw-Hill Book Company has issued a set of guidelines for its legion of nonfiction writers and editors on pruning their copy of telltale sexisms. For in- stance, "mankind" is lo be peneiled out of Ihe wayward author's text and replaced by "human be- "human race" or just plain "people." We may henceforth read of primitive people but not primitive man unless woman gets equal billing, in which case it will be permissible to speak of primi- tive men and women in the same breath. A man-made lake? Not a person- made lake, surely? it should be re- ferred to as artificial, synthetic, manu- factured, constructed, or of human ori- gin. An artificial lake, well, okay. But just try the sound of "We went swim- ming in a lake of human origin." Extreme examples perhaps, hut revealing of (he problem of trying to make English usage conform to a new set of rules. Jacques Barain, the authnr- professor at Columbia university, sug- gesls that all this could load lo such absurdities us calling a seagoing man-of- war a "war person" or leaching future students of the French Revolution about "liberty., equality and sorority." And will historians of tomorrow speak of the colonial militia on Lexington Green, or perhaps Paul Revere and his guerilla band, to avoid using the odious Minuteman? There is no end to the possibilities. McGraw-Hill suggests thai slatesmen, whoever they are, be known as public servants or leaders. The busi- ness man, whether he runs the shoe- repair shop on Ihe corner or General Mo- tors, will become a "business execulive" or "business leader." "Sex is a source of chaos in lan- guage generally, as it is in Baram observes in The Columbia Forum maga- zine. He wonders if, in the attempt to expunge sexism, Ihe language docsn'l get wrenched out of shape and misun- derstood. "The eslhetic sense, not to say the arl of lilerature, is implicated in Ihis sil- Wofergafe ad infinitum ly Barzun goes on to say. "Per- son is nol a word lo cherish and ubiqui- tize (he word is disagreeably hoity- loily: 'There is a person at the door'? In Ihe classic English novel Ihe young per- son holds an ambiguous place always a she, bul now unsavory, now requiring protection." Lesl the professor stand in danger of having his own words wrenched out of shape or misunderstood, it must be said (hat he is not opposed lo the goal of mak- ing Ihe language beller express the idea of equality between the sexes. He has obvious reservations about -trying to reach that goal by edicl. Besides, a man can't be loo careful what he wriles these (lays. 'Wallowing" is right By Don Oakley IT MAY all be water over the gale In most weary Americans, but his- toricans, and certainly future Americans, are going lo be "wallowing" in the subject for generations to come. The way things are going, lltey will have whole libraries devoled to it The first issue of a new review published by Harper's Maga- zine Co., listed a partial Watergate bllili- ography of 4B titles. Those swelling the "W" card catalogue file include: "Walcrgale by Ihe "Walergale: Chronology of a "Watergale and Ihe While House" "Walergale: Crime In Ihe "Walergale "Watcri-ule Portraits" "Walcrgale. Hie View from the "Watergate and the Myth American Democracy" and simply Interested researchers will also find such intriguing tilles as "Klrcsldc Wat- ergale" "Watergate "Wat- ergate Follies" and .siimollmm railed "Watergate That's just the W's. Olhcr lilies include biographies of Richard Nixon Sen. Sam Krvln and other Watergate personalities, examinations of the im- pcaelmiBHl process and the doctrine of executive privilege, Ihe Agnew scandal and Ihe conslllulionnl and'hislnrical impllenllmis of Watergate In general. t Tills is not even m nienllon all (he I'mimlrs Unit are oxpeclcd lo come nor (hi! thousands upons thousands of pnm II_ government dncumrnls, such as (lit While House lapo transcripts and Judici- ary rnmmlMeo henrini-.s   

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