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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 18, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 18, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- I? a 1 r tonight and Thursdiiy wllli lows lu- nlght Jn the mid Highs Thursday, around 80. VOLUME 92-NUMBER 252 FINAL 15 CENTS CEDAR KAPIDS, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1974 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES Terrorists Surrender To Palestinian Group LONDON (AP) Prime Min- ister Harold Wilson Wednesday called a national election for Oct. 10 dial is virtually certain to be fought out on ways to con- trol Britain's soaring cost of liv- ing. An announcement from Wil- son's office at No. 10 Downing St. said Queen Elizabeth II BULLETIN DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) Three Japanese terrorists who occupied the French embassy in ihc Hague landed in Da- mascus Wednesday and sur- rendered lo Palestinian gueril- las, an airport spokesman an- nounced. DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) Three Japanese terrorists who occupied the French embassy in The Hague for four, days landed in Damascus Wednesday. A government .spokesman said hey were considering a Syrian day for the paign. three-week would dissolve parliament Fri-offer to surrender in exchange, cam'ifor safe conduct to any countryj The new parliament will con- vene Oct. 29 and the parly with the most members in the 635- seat house of commons will form Britain's next government. Wilson's "Laborites, former Prime Minister Edward Heath's opposition Conservatives and Jeremy Thorpe's small middle- road Liberals Monday will begin a daily round of nationally- televised press conferences. Rival Approaches Spokesmen for all three par- ties agreed that the major issue would be rival approaches on how lo arrcsl. Britain's rate of inflation, now Hearing 20 per- cent annually. In calling the election, Wilson is gambling with his political life. Opinion polls arc in- conclusive, with some showing a narrow lead for his party. He is aware that public opin- ion can shift radically during of their choice. Tlie terrorists flew from Am- sterdam after releasing their- nine remaining hostages. A vol- unteer crew of two Dutchmen and a Briton flew the Boeing 727. In The Hague, the French am- bassador, Jaques Senard, said he and 10 other hostages "lived at gunpoint" during their four days of captivity. the campaign and is fond of saying "a week is a long time in politics." In 1970, Wilson called an elec- tion when enjoying a comfort- able lead in the polls, only to be upset by Heath's Conservatives four weeks later. Heath fell into the samo trap last February, calling for a ballot when polls showed him ahead, only lo lose on election day. Indecisive Vole The February vote decisive, giving Nixon Tapes Pact Tested By Jaworski WASHINGTON (AP) Spe- cial prosecutor Leon Jaworski is about to test the limits of an agreement for delivery of White House lapcs and documents to Richard Nixon by seeking some of them for Watergate prosecu- tions. A list of requested documents and lapcs is in preparation at I the prosecutor's office, a spoki was m- Labor the iViGSi commons scats but depriving it of a working majority. Wilson now seeks a mandate to push through his party's sial program of economic recov- cry, including higher taxes on for ,1 a w o r s k i said Wednesday. The request is to bo delivered lo President Ford's counsel. Philip Buchen when the list is completed. The request marks the first lime since the tapes agreement with Nixon was announced Sept. 8 that Jaworski has sought some of the materials scheduled (o be sent to a vault near Nixon's San G'lemente estate. "For CO hours we had no food, no water and no bed. It was a horrible Senard told newsmen Wednesday. "In all they shot 25 bullets at the office ceiling and into the floor right next to my Senard said. In Damascus, a spokesman said that a rarnp requested by the gunmen was put at the aircraft's front exit, apparently touching off a premature sur- render report. But the doors remained shut and the ramp was removed again five minutes later at the terrorists request, the spokes- man said. Batteries Recharged The spokesman said negotia- tions continued with a Syrian general and the terrorists while the planes batteries were being recharged. Dutch Justice Minister Dries van Agt said one of the terror- ists was wounded in a gun bat- tle with police Friday, and it was believed he was rapidly getting worse. Van Agt said that was probably why the trio agreed lo accept in- stead of the SI million they demanded. The three Red Army men who invaded the French embassy in the Dutch capital Friday took Senard, eight other men and two young women employes hostage. They demanded the release of Red Army in France seven weeks before, and a Boe- ing 707 jet lo lake the four of them lo a destination of their choice. Added Demand Furuya was brought lo Schi- phol airport and Ihc plane was promised, but the terrorists on Sunday added Ihc money de- mand, saying it would be "com- pensation" for Furuya's time in jail. A While House spokesman in- dicated that Jaworski is seeking a compromise with Nixon's law- yer over access lo the matcri- Yu'laka Furuya, member arrested Tclepltolo INTEGRATION VIGIL A boy wearing a riot helmet offers some of his popcorn to one of the policemen keeping vigil around South Boston high school, where black pupils are being bused by court order. Attendance continues low. Although the French govern- ment refused to pay, Ihc terror- ists released their 'two women lioslagcs early Monday and con- tinued to negotiate with Dutch officials by telephone. Tuesday night a police bus .vilh barred windows drove up :o the four-story embassy, and six of the remaining nine hos- ages came out, followed by WASHINGTON (APJ-Defcnse officials acknowledge that Presi- dent Ford's conditional amnesty plan leaves a loophole through which returning Vietnam-era de- serters could escape alternate I public service. They concede it would be pos- sible for such deserters to get off with no greater price than an undesirable discharge. The same loophole does not exist for draft evaders, who would remain subject to prose- cution under federal civilian had the rich and more nalional-is '3 ix.alion of nrivatc industry. one in Jaworski's office known jn advance of ihc law if they reneged on pledges to perform alternate service. It is unclear whether Penta- terrorists IS011 lawyers were aware of Ihe The men boarded Hie bus and cscaPc halcn for deserters, or izalion of private industry. The parlies differ in Ihcir ap- proach lo inflation. Labor wants voluntary wage controls and some statutory price controls. The Conservatives say statutory control of both wages and prices may be needed if voluntary re- straints fail. The Liberals, who have not held power since World war I, between Benlon Becker, a pri- vate Washington lawyer acting for Ford, and Nixon's attorney. Herbert Miller. Tlie agreement calls on Nixon to provide any materials sub- poenaed for criminal or civil court trials, but places them al- most completely under his cus- tody and permits him to chal- lenge any subpoena in court. seek to build a middle ground. Tnc arrangement was cri- Thcy trebled their vote to six as "disaster" by one million in February, largelyjprosecution source. "What if "Nixon says he can't find what we wanl. or gels seriously ill or from public dissatisfaction with Ihe two major parlies, bill won only 1-t scats in commons. In another close election they----- could be the balance of power and form a coalition with cither Labor or Conservatives. even the source said. were driven along a heavily guarded highway lo Ihe airport. The oilier Ihrce hostages were quickly taken from the em- bassy. whether it was overlooked in Ihcir haste to meet Ford's re- quirement for a program de- signed lo provide an opportunity ifor "earned re-entry." ing legally enforceable to have turned himself tracts. Under the Ford program, a deserter who chooses to return must turn himself in to his military service. If found elig- ible, he is required lo sign a rcaffirmation of allegiance lo the Unilcd Slates, and a pledge lo faithfully complete a period of public duty of 24 months or less, as determined by his mili- tary service. At this point, his service fore- iocs prosecution and hands the man an undesirable discharge. The plan next calls for the man to report lo his stale se- lective service director within 15 days of his discharge "to I in on Tuesday. John Barry, 22, turned him- self in to federal authorities in San Francisco. Barry, who had never registered for the draft, (Photo on Picture said, "This whole mess is not going lo be a stigma I'll carry lie rest of my life." Doug Billle returned lo San Francisco from Canada to take a look at Ford's offer, but he was cautious. Bittlc said, "I want to look at it a lot more closely. If they want reasonable service, reasonable work, I'm interested. I wouldn't mind Border stations have been (ok lo allow any draft dodgers 01 deserters on their wanted lists to enter the country after giving them a copy of Ford's amnesty proclamation. arrange for performance of al stafe At the airport, the terrorists boarded the plane and then re- leased the six hostages one by one as the flight crew boarded. The ambassador was the last to leave, as Furuya was brought aboard. Chuckle The Unilcd States is slill the land of opportunity anyone can become a taxpayer. Beyond Reach Tlie problem arises because returning deserters would be beyond the reach of military law once discharged. And law- yers say they know of no fed- eral civil law the deserters would violate if they then either failed to report for service or left their alternate assigned tcrnate service." But, by that deserter turned or doing anything in which point, the re-felt I was helping someone." officially has jobs before their time was up. become a civilian, and defense officials say they cannot cite any applicable legal penalty if the man does not report for or walks away from the job he is given. Prisoners Freed Ford's clemency program has; temporarily freed most of the! 95 Vietnam-era draft evaders in! federal prisons, but some may' be back. The justice department'said draft evaders like Bitlle may re-cnlcr Ihc country without fear of arrest for 15 days. Pass (o U.S. The grace period is aimed at giving them time to apply for amnesty, but the FBI conceded it could be used as a loophole lo allow exiles lo visit their families and friends without fear of apprehension. However, attorney John Liss, a 27-year-old draft evader from New York who has become a Canadian citizen, said in an in- terview on Tuesday that draft dodgers and deserters still ran a risk in making such a visit. And the staff at AMEX-Can- ada, a magazine published here by U.S. exiles, counselled draft rcsisters and deserters who UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. AP) President Ford, pledg- ng increased food shipments broad, told the U. N. General Wednesday that "a lobal strategy for food and nergy is urgently required." In his first appearance before lie world organization, Ford aid the alternative lo coopera- ion is confrontation. "Let us not delude 3 said. "Failure to cooperate n oil, food and inflation could pell disaster for every nation cprcsenled in this room. The nitcd Nations must not and eed not allow this to occur. A lobal strategy for food and nergy is urgently required." Ford departed from his pre- >ared lext to underscore sup- wt for Secretary of Stale Kis- inger, who was disturbed Tues- ay by reports that a "Iransi- ion recommendation" to Ford irged that the secretary be Gripped of his role as the Pres- dent's assistant for national se- curity affairs. "H should be Ford declared, "that Ihe sec- retary of state has my full support and the unquestioned backing of the American peo- ple." There was a scattering of ap- plause. Discussing what the U. S. is willing lo do to lielp hungry na- ions, Ford said food aid abroad vould be increased this year by an unspecified amount and (he U. S. is "prepared lo join in a vorldwide effort to negotiate, iSlablish and maintain an inter- lalional system of food rc- erves." Ford added thai "each nation lust determine for itself how it lanages its reserves." The President said the U. S. 'ould "set forth our compre- ensive proposals" lo meet resent and future world needs t the November World Food inference in Rome. The President set forth four rinciplcs which he said should luide a global approach to food nd energy problems: First, all nations must suh- tantially increase production, ust to maintain the present tandards of living the world nist almost double its output of asked about Ford's program not food and energy (Continued: Page 3, Col. 5.) S ice Pentagon officials say signed I Because to some, Ford's offer Nuclear-Curb Talks ResumedN" in" WASHINGTON .senate Wednesday passed a billion appropriations bill curb- use of federal funds GENEVA (AP) U.S. andjahorlions or school busing for Soviet negotiators The vote was 77 launched a new e f in r I lujto 12. achieve, possibly by next year, I The bill, providing funds for i vivo Ihe senate-house a wide-ranging accord liniilingimost of Ihc government's on Ihc legislation, each other's nuclear overkill social was pacitics. million below Ihc 50-34. The rider then was adopt- The Iowa supreme court (Wednesday suspended the law iilerl0es In eomnlclc nitnrmtrli v" (license of former Second district pitagcs lo complete altenwic (0 allcrnalive service in n n u service arc not considered bind-Of jail was no different tirm1 g Biomwcll i .1 u iciem in.m Jn connection with Ins failure to what they refused to do j d iwhethcr either rider, would Ihcy were imprisoned. They said they owed the nation no refusing to fight in called an immoral service for what they war. Mainly Mcdicaid The Busing Hitler busini; After a half-year recess, they had a opening lwo-hoiir-and-10-minute session in the new round of their super secret stra- tegic cirms SALT II. (ration budget request and T'10 abortion ban would Sen. Helms lli-N. and Report Selassie Is Hospitalized million below Ihc house total. Such reductions have been un- precedented in recent years. Normally I lie senate has voted considerably more than the I President asked and Hie house I allowed. 1 Addeil as Hidcrs principally to Mcdicaid, Ihc health program for welfare re- cipients and other poor families. .Senator Barllelt returns for the years 19G5 through 1972. In a seven-page opinion, the justices noted their decision fol- lowed precedent in similar cases but that revocation ot a law license may be necessary in Ihe future "if Iliis action fails as Bromwell, of 1920 Kidgc- Vay drive SE, pled guilty in ;Ccdar Rapids federal court to a Several others who did leavejchargc of failing to file a fcder- sponsorod said would return return for 18119. a year the In- Ihan accept alternative service.jlcrnal Revenue Service claims Steve Bczich of Chicago was one. lie refused lo leave Ihc federal reformatory at El Heno, Okla., saying he wouldn't accept anything .short of amnesty. lomary senate stand on this issue. Busing foes hailed it as at least a symbolic victory. sponsor of the rider, said he 1111- But supporters of busing pro- riersiood Medicaid paid for [abortions in M or 15 stales. Bill a spokesman for Planned Par grams noted that the Nixon ad- ministration said repeatedly thai virtually no federal funds nlhcod said at least 2C> stateslwere used to implement roiirl Attorney General Saxbc had ordered Ihe imprisoned draft evaders released Tuesday on 30 day furloughs to give Ihcm time lo appeal their sentences lo a newly created clemency board. Presumably thai board might rule that some inmates must spend lime, doing public service he had gross income of Bromwcll conceded, in a writ- ten stipulation lo Ihe court's grievance committee, that he willfully and knowingly failed lo file slate and federal returns for the eight years. IS Months Jarncs Bromwell Although he admiltcd he failed lo file in those years, Bromwell contends he owes no taxes. "Neither (his committee court makes any finding whether lax is owing in any of Itlio above the opinion I Second, all nations must seek lo achieve a level of prices which not only provides an in- centive to producers but which consumers can afford By confronting consumers with pro- duction restrictions, artificial pricing and the prospect of ul- timate bankruptcy, producers will eventually become the vic- tims of their own actions. Third, all nations must avoid the abuse of man's fundamental needs for the sake of narrow na- tional or bloc advantage. The attempt by any country to use one commodity for political pur- poses will inevitably tempt other countries to use their commodities for their own pur- poses. Fourth, the nations of the world must assure that the poorest among us arc not over- whelmed by rising prices of the imports necessary for their sur- vival. The traditional aid donors (Continued: Page3, Col. -I.) lint this year the bill's spon-j allowed abortions under Hie pro-ihusing orders. Normally in lien of completing Iheirl "'s begins inline-] ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia said they were (IIIKIS have paid for the busing, Isontcnees. ;dialcly. He will be eligible lo; Unconfirmed reports Wcdncs-ilo hold down federal Tile federal government pays. They also said that several Karly reports indicated Iho rein.slalenicnt after IS day said deposed K m p r r n r and help the on inflation. lilt lo It'l percent Ihe cost of senators who would have "p-'clemciicy offer wasn't hrhm Ilaile Selassie is in weak clinch- The busing and abortion see- Medicaid. II pays the biggest posed Ihc rider were absent. .much better with those who had Today's Index Comics ...................7D Crossword ................71) Daily Record .............3A Heaths ....................3A Editorial Fo.aturfs ...liA, 7A lion from a hunger strike and timis were added Tui-s has been admitted lo a military riders lo Hie original bill. hospital. He is 112. One rider would bar .Spokesmen of Ihe niili-Y'iny lederai iuncis for lar> er.lllleii denied the I'rni-r.ille. .ulileil .ii uU'l lay as share in low-income slates. Also Tuesday, the senate avoided Senator Hathaway I Il-Mainet. turned back three attempts to'miinlrv. u.-e of opposing Ihe amendment, said it exempt larj.e numbers of small; Imsing'disrriminalrd against the poor. ;businesses Ircim the ifli'i) job 1 lie M'lljit ii> kill tih" I'iliei' lie.mil ,ihd ,Hl .n (II.V prison by leaving "f a .Sioux City Strong Words The court added strong woril.-i regarding Bromwell, although ,puinting mil that under bothl !so f. .attorney. Donald Sylvester. Hisi suspension begins Oct. 1, and he ;may apply tor reinstatement 'rll'lCr SA llllli'.ili.V lax return is Farm Finanrial Marion Movies Society Sports Stale Television Ads .......70 ...101) .......1C ......ISC .1211-1511 IC-3C 111! .120-151)   

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