Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 16, 1974 - Page 8

Share Page

Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 16, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                8 The Cedar Rapids Cyclic: Moa.. Sept. IS. Senators Gef Letters lowans Protest Nixon Pardon By Dorothy Williams WASHINGTON President Ford's pardon of former President Nixon has touched iiff a protest from lowans'un- like anything to reach capitol hill since the ouster of special Watergate Prosecutor Ar- chibald Cox last October. In (tie first four days after announcement of the pardon Son. Dick Clark (D-Iowa) received 227 telegrams and letters opposing Ford's action with only two in support of the move. Sen. Harold Hughes (D- Iowa) counted 103 communica- lions with only three of these endorsing Ford's stand. Outrage and frustration characterized the attitudes wilh many asking, as did a Vinton couple: "Please, please tell us what do we tell our young people. Why should they believe in the system? Why should they This couple added in a postscript, "We all feel that this deal was made before Nixon ever quit." Their letter, like most, was handwritten. Some communications were accompanied by a copy of a letter sent to Ford. Such was the case with the handwritten letter signed by five Cedar Rapldians who Identified themselves as lifelong Re- publicans. Kcgard Actlou They told Ford they regard- ed his action as "most despic- able" and that it "could be considered an act of coward- ice. "The American people are entitled to know the truth which can only be obtained by a they said. They add- ed, "One can only conclude from your action at this time that you have also lied to the American people when you say no deal was made with Mr. Nixon.' "Ford just shot this country and law and order down the a Cedar Hupids man telegraphed. "Nixon's crimes were against us all and our hard- won another Cedar Rapids man wired. "Pardon Is an outrageous, dangerous Insult." Also from Cedar Rapids came the letter from a man who wrote, "I don't Ihink my God would treat people dif- ferently because of their posi- tion in life. I've always be- lieved he would show mercy equally with a former presi- dent or a Mr. Nobody that steals and goes to prison for it. Suffers "He too suffers because he gets the letter went on. "His family also suffers." "How could he get a pardon wilhouteljeing indicted or tried Dean, "who (old Hie trull in a Cedar Knpids very early and the opponent 'rovides Dignitary Security By Jerry Murscner DBS MOINES (DPI) The deputy commissioner of public safety said Monday the agency will provide security for high- ranking dignitaries making campaign appearances in Iowa although the trips are politically oriented. Robert Holetz, who dis- state troopers often provide security for Mamie Eisenhower when she visits relatives in Iowa, said if the protection is sought for a pub- lic official or visiting politi- cian (he department would review the request and prov- ide assistance if it was deemed necessary. "As far as I am con- Holetz said, "we will play them all the same." Butz Trip The question of providing state security for private polit- ical trips arose earlier this month when Agriculture Sec- retary Earl Butz made a two- day swing through northeast Iowa to support. Republican candidates. Butz told news- men his travel expenses were lining paid by the candidates and his trip was political rather than official in na- ture. However, two Iowa highway patrol cars and troopers were assigned to accompany Butz during the trip. Additional troopers were also on hand at a GOP fund-raiser in Mar- shalltown and at a community festival in Crcsco. Holcls said Butz was pro- tected regardless of the politi- cal nature of the trip to ensure there would be no problems. Hard To Argue "What would happen if some farmer had decided to stab him (Bulz) with a pitchfprk or whatever? It would be pretty hard to argue after the fact that we should not provide security for said Holetz. "It was justified in this case and I don't think we have any choice in the matter." Holetz said the public off cials should be able to receiv protection "regardless of wh; we are doing in Iowa." He said troopers frequent! meet Mamie Eisenhower "a Ihe border when she conies t the slate" to visit friends an relatives in Boone. In addi lion, he said the trooper make frequent checks to en sure her safety. Holetz said, however, tha requests for protection o dignitaries would be made or an individual basis depending on the importance of the indi vidual, the person's low; schedule and whether Ihi events he would be attending arc in the department's "ju risdiction" whether tin visiting official would be mak ing appearances in rural areas where other law enforccmen agencies would bo unable tr provide protection. He said the major factor would be whether the officia: or his hosts made a request for a security force. "We're not going lo force ourselves on anyone; but if we get a re quest and it's in our jurisdic lion we would probably do he added. Holetz said he was unaware of any requesls for slate prot- ection of either Republican California Gov. Ronald Reagan or Sen. Edwarc Kennedy (D-Mass.) when they make campaign appearances in Ihe nexl four weeks. He said "if the circumstances are the same, they would get the same treatment" as Bat at That Bat, Kill It IOWA CITY Bats in the house? People at the state hygenic laboratory who study the nocturnal fliers suggest that they should be allowed to escape not slain. "A bat found flying around inside a house is just trying to find a place to spend the explained Dr. Franklin P. Koonlz, assistant director of the lab. "Normally, it is he added. Rabies Fears To people worried about rabies-bearing bats, Dr. Kocmlz said lhat a bat "flying around in a house is invariably nega- tive for rabies. "The rabid bat is the one found flapping around on the sidewalk at noon or the one which attacks without provoca- tion." Lab officials said they have been asked by several lowans in recent weeks about how lo cope wilh Ihe crealures. Dr. Koontz suggested that people trying lo rid Iheir homes of bals should open a window or door and shoo the bat away. A tennis or badminton racket is sometimes helpful. Sonar System "If you use anything solid, the bat will just sonar awuy from Dr. Koonlz said. Bals employ a lypc of echo-loca- tion mechanism to guide them in flighl. The lab suggests that people bitten by bats should, as in the case of any animal bite, try to capture Ihe assailanl so it can be examined for rabies. Decorah Has Eight Visitors (WORM! Eight visitors from Japan are guests cur- rently of four families and several Lulheran churches in the Decorah area. The visitors are among a firoup' of 179 Japanese resi- dents who will bo observing church and community life as p.'irt of the Bridge of Fellow- ship program of Ihe Iowa district the American Lu- theran church. Arriving in Decorah Friday, (he visitors will join the re- mainder of the party for a banquet Wednesday at Iowa Stall; university Decorah hosts include Mr. and Maynard Aaker Dr. and Mrs. Vincent Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Kvame and Mr. and Mrs. Or- villc Halvcrson. ON THIS DATE in 1973, democratic Senator William Mondalc of Minnesota urged congress lo create a study commission lo recommend methods to Insure that the While House would he ac- countable lo the American people and the congress. Cars Collide On Dusty Road INDEPENDENCE Fail- ure lo control his vehicle was charged against Randal Charles Steffen, 21, of rural Winlhrop after his car rammed the rear of another auto just north of Independ- ence on a Buchanan counly gravel road Sunday evening. Steffen told sheriff's officers that dust prevcnled him from seeing a car driven by Ken- nelh Earl Gosse, 38, of Marion on Ihe road ahead of him. Following the impact, the Steffen car left the road and hit a farm fence. Neither driver required medical treatment. Damage to Sleffen's car was estimated at and Gosse's car, Barn Burns INDEPENDENCE In- lependcnce firemen were :alleri at p.m. Sunday to a fire on a farm owned by Donald Higgins four miles north of Independence on highway 150. The land is armed by Higgins' son Tom. 'he barn, which was being orn down, caughl fire when lames spread from a nearby ubbish fire. woman asked. Another woman, also writ- ing from Cedar Rapids, said Ihe pardon continues "the coverup and further obstructs justice." Still another Cedar Rapidian usked her senators to "work to right this greut wrong." A Cedar Hupids couple, recalling the pledge of allegi- ance, asked "'with liberty and justice for Then answer- ing their own question, they replied, "Obviously not." There are many communi- cations from Iowa City, too. One woman from there said she know of no better way lo silently but publicly protest "than to hang the American flag at half mast." Political "Impeach wired one man from Iowa City, while a part-time student from (here called the pardon "purely political." He added it "Smacks of a deal. It is an act of unfairness to all Americans and weakening of the govern- ment of their country." "Do we the citizens, have any recourse to demand that truth and justice an Iowa City-couple asked, while a man writing from there said thai there was time enough for a pardon if Nixon were found guilty. "This premature act sug- gests the possibilily that Mr. Ford himself might be con- vinced of Mr. Nixon's the letter continued. "Other- wise, why close off inquiry now." A Ml. Vernon man said he was "appalled, shocked and exceedingly depressed" by the pardon, while a couple, writ- ing from that community, called for a pardon of John of the Vietnam war who acte( out of conscience." "I can't beliove he did because of Nixon's Ml. Vernon woman said, "ills ealth was alright when h was in the White House." She asked if Ihe pardon was "jus lice and obeying the law." Also from Ml. Vernon was the couple's letter calling OIL pardon an "arrogant act o! insensitive cronyism." "Does all (he (ruin-reveal- ing of Watergate mean no she asked. "Are not entitled to The presidency "requires higher standards and hoick the greatest rewards, there- fore, penalties for misconduct should be most i Marshalltown couple wrote while another couple wrote from Ihere, "Is forgiveness wilhout reconciliation Chris- Development Another Marshalltown cou- ple sees this development as another Walergate. "Please do not vote any money for his leaving Ihe White they pleaded. "If any of us would cheat on our income lax, plus lie to the courts, we would be put away so fast wo would wonder what they added. A Washington, Iowa, at- torney said Ford should have delayed the pardon at least unlil the Haldeman and Er- lichman Irial was under way and the jury sworn and sequestered "so (hat jury could not be possibly preju- dicied by the news of this pardon." He said Ford "should have waited until aft- er conviction or acquittal so fads both for and against Mr. Nixon could be established." Expect No Immediate Ridgewood Division Action MARQUETTE No inline- testified before Judge Petcr- diate decision is anticipated in son that Ridgewood residents the separation action which are getting no snow removal ddition and no trash collection. He lodged also pointed oul his residence is three miles from the Marquetle fire slalion. ID addition, he said, his Roger Peterson recently, but a electrical service is provided decision will not be handed by McGregor municipal utili- down until the judge has had an opportunity lo study all the residents of Bickcl's addition to Ridgewood have against Marquette. A hearing was held before Clayton county District Judge ties. Marquette's Mayor Bill malcrial submitted to him and Dickey, in his testimony, said judicial preced- to research en Is. Eleven of the 12 Ridgewood Ihe community has made no effort to maintain l'ic road to Ihe development in the belief properly owners have asked it was a private road, lhat it that the development be sepa- rated from Marquette, claim- ing lhat while it is located on i hilltop overlooking the the only road to :hc addition is from McGregor. In order to provide normal community services, the resi- dents claim, Marquette facili- ies must cross a portion of VIcGregor to 'get to Ridge- vood. As a result, according o the residents, they do not normal n .-vices. One resident, Bill Gruvcr, had been so time. marked at one inton Gazette Plioto by Nolle Hopkinton residents are about nearer their rjonl of for a town swimming pool after a benefit car wash Saturday. The money, which must be raised by January 1975, will supplement a donation from the Meda Crose estate and be matched by federal funds. More than has already been raised through various projects including a walk- a-thon and auction. Wiping off this pickup camper are (left to right) Paul Hunter, 10; Danny Larson, 13; Brenda Coggins, 15; Melinda Welter, 17; while Butch and Kay Dettbarn spray and supervise. All are from Hopkinton. By The Associated Press Four persons died in traffic accidents in Iowa over the weekend. Gary Mueller, of Gran- ville, was killed Sunday when his ear collided with a loaded cattle truck on highway 18 east of Hartley. Authorities said the truck driver, John of Carrington, N.D., escaped injury but 12 of 118 Franchise Vote Set In Postville POSTVILLE A special el- ection will be held here Oct. 9 in the issue of whether to renew the electrical franchise with Interstate Power Co. Ac- tion scheduling the election was taken recently by the 'ostville city council. An ordinance passed by the council makes it possible for he firm to seek a 25-year ranchisc. Previous franchises ivcre approved on a ten-year >asis. Interstate has agreed to make permanent repairs lo he portion of the underground viring system on the down- own street lights. The compa- ly also has agreed to conlrib- ite to a street light im- irovcment fund. Polls for the franchise vote will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 .m. Oct. 9. Police Chief Assumes McGregor Duties McGREGOR Marvin Dunford, former Marquetle police chief, has assumed dulics as a 40-hour-per week patrolman, assisting Police Chief Frank Mullarkey. Named to a six-monlh train- ing period, under a federal program administered by Ihe state, Dunford has been employed recently at McGregor Municipal Utilities. In that capacity, (he town of McGregor has been paying his salary to keep the town's emergency communications systems, which arc located (here, in operation from mid- night to 8 a.m. His salary during the police officer training period will be paid by the state. head of cattle he was hauling were killed. Randall Clark, 57, of rural Algona, suffered fatal injuries Saturday when his motorcycle went out of control on a Winnebago county blacktop road south of Thompson. Two other persons died in separate accidents Friday night. Ricardo Hall, 17, of Guthrie Center, was killed when the car he was driving struck a farm tractor on a Guthrie county road three miles south of Guthrie Center. The tractor driver, James Bradford, 40, of Guthrie Center, escaped in- jury. Glen Visser of Sanborn died Friday night enroute to a Sheldon hospital of injuries suffered in a car-train crash at the edge of Sanborn. Authorities said Visser was one of five young people rid- ing in a car driven by Dennis Holtz of Melvin. Holtz was hospitalized at Melvin. Transferred to a Sioux City hospital were Sue Schurrer and Jerri Patcrson, both of Sanborn. and Mark Mayer of Melvin. All three were listed in critical condition. Schaben: Establish Rail Mediation Boarc CRESTON James Schaben would work to estab- lish a Railroad Abandonment Mediation board if he were elected governor. "The possibility of Iowa los- ing thousands of miles of railroad lines through aban- donment is more acute today than it ever the Demo- cratic1 gubernatorial candidate told guests at a fund raising affair here Sunday. The board, Schaben ex- plained, would act as a stopgap against abandonment. He said the board would meet wilh railroad companies to develop "working alternatives in an effort to avoid abandon- ment." Senior Citizen Buses Cedar Rapids System Telephone 363-8244 Area Ten (SEATS) In Cedar Rapids 398-5605 Elsewhere 800-332-5996 Distress Signal Sparks Search For Aircraft WINFIELD dis- tress signal of the type emit- ted by an aircraft in trouble sparked a search by state, county and local police in the Winfield area. The effort began Sunday afternoon, hut searchers suspended operations until Monday because of darkness. Henry county Sheriff Ri- chard Droz reported that a plane in the Winfield area late Sunday afternoon received a distress signal. Cedar Rapids and Bur- lington flight service workers were notified that the crash site was believed to be in a 10- 15-mile radius of Winfield. Henry and Jefferson county sheriffs' deputies, stale troopers, local authorities and conservation officers who searched were aided by a state aircraft and a plane from Jefferson county. Droz said a Winfield resi- dent told of hearing a plane, then what sounded like an explosion. can winters cold be far behind? Then the time to check with us. Cedar Rapids' Glass Screen Repair! Hqrs. We Repair All Makes of Metalf Doors Windows. and don't forget those great P.USCO WINDOWS and DOORS to make your house a real home! 1 6 Beautiful Colors! Baked-on finish lasts for years! o Doors available in safety-glass You get a dependable Full warranty! A woll-saaled home Is a good way to cut air conditioning and heating costs, up to RUSCO stool window, and doors glvo added insulation. And RUSCO windows feature the only burglar-proof installation, and a full war- ranty. Ask for RUSCO the loader slnco 1937. IOWA ON THE COSTS OF COOLING EATING A BETTE! HOME INCREASED VALUE The Quality Loader Since J 937 "Folks who arc Still Quality Mlndod" "There Jte a Difference" Phone 364-0295 INC. 515 8th Avenue S.E. Wofro a great Staff of to Mjt Evenings, call; DON AMEHT, 363-tIM JERRY WILUAMSCH, COOQON 435-2273 HARK UPREE, 362-2733 RICH F.TSCHEIDT, NEWHALL 223-5438 BIU YOM, STWWOOD 945-3992   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication