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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 15, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 15, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                10A Cedar Rapids Gazelle: Sun.. Sept. 13. 1971 Cedar lower Combines Productivity and Ingenuity By Dale Kuctcr The Cedar River Tower in Cedar Rapids is constructive evidence that American productivity and Yankee inge- nuity are not dead. If productivity is waning, as economy experts say, then the 25-story apartment building is a standing exception. The first footings were poured in late October of 1973. By June of this year, the project was really getting off the ground. Sidewalk superintendents marveled at the building's skyward speed. Art Rin- Art Rinderknecht derknecht was pleasantly surprised too. Rinderknecht, of Atkins, is project superintendent [or Knulson Construction Co. of Minneapolis, general contrae- John Schick, laborer foreman: "There has been good job coordination and good worker morale." Ron Traut, carpenter: "When the job is going good, the men get along better." tor. All of the men working on the building, Rinderknecht points out with pride, are from the Cedar Rapids area. Not that he has anything against computerized critical path schedules, hut Rin- derknecht drew up his own bargraph timetable. "We have 18 months. Oc- cupancy is slated for next May Rinderknechl said. "That's.a tough schedule. By Thanksgiving the building must be closed in." The project Is ahead ol schedule despite the loss ol five weeis of work time four to weather and one be- cause of a shortage in steel reinforcement rods. What has been the secret in keeping the Cedar River Tower project climbing? "One of the said Cato Webb of Quasqueton, Rinderknecht's assistant, "is getting men to cooperate, tu get along. Sure, we have had some problems, but they were solved before they got out of hand. "I would say the Cedar Rapids worker is easier to work said Webb. "In fact, organized labor as a whole here is more coopera- tive than in other places. "There are closer ties between the crafts. In some places, it is dog eat dog. The ironworker hates the carpen- ter, and the carpenter hates the laborer." Not a single day's work has been lost so far because of labor problems. By the time the job is completed, nearly every building craft will have been involved. Rinderknecht, a seven-year veteran with Knutson after 17 years with Rinderknecht Construction Co., said there has been an unusual coopera- tive spirit on the project. "There has been no slough- ing off and there has been no said Rinderknecht. He and Webb agreed that the first rule Is to treat every- one fairly. "If you do said Rinderknecht, "then you can fire .someone who hasn't been doing the job and the rest will say, 'I'm surprised you walled so long.' That philosophy has appar- ently worked. "There has been good job coordination and good worker said John Schick, 358 Thirtieth street drive SE, laborer foreman. "The men have been treat- ed well. Another thing is that people just walking by and friends who aren't in the construction business have said, 'Say, you guys are really doing some kind of a job on this building.' That has really helped morale. "There has been good en- gineering on IMs Schick continued. "Everything has fi! the way it's supposed to. I've been in construction five years, and this has been the best job I've worked on." A similar appraisal was given by Ron Traut. Van Home, a carpenter. "The rela- tionship between the men has been better on this job than any I've worked on before. "I don't know if it's a good crew because of good manage- ment or Traut contin- ued. "1 know when the job is Goto Webb, assistant superintendent: "Putting up one of these takes a certain amount of close- ness between people." going good, the men get along better. "On many jobs you can't even trust those working with said Traut. "You lay a tool down, and the next thing you know it's gone. Here, you can put down a tool and it would still be there the next day." While the productivity of the crew, which peaked at about 30 men, has played a major role in the building's erection, the direction and savvy of Rinderknecht and Webb have allowed for the symphonic-like progression. It amounts to meshing the work of some two dozen sub- contractors and a dozen build- ing crafts into a time frame and budget. When Rinderknecht was making his time estimate for the job, he figured five work- ing days to pour one floor. "That was the norm for Knul- son on Minneapolis projects, and frankly we were worried about a one-week cycle." By the time workmen had the base ready, Rinderknechl had an idea for modifying the "flying form" system so that the sequence of operation left no one crafl wailing on an- olhcr. Everyone kepi busy. Tile overhead crane opera- tor was able to move Ihe forms for an enlire floor in ten Columns were erect- ed the day previous to pouring the floors. After the forms were in po- silion, another crew worked on placement of reinforcement rods and sheerwalls were formed from underneath. Once workers caught the rhythm of the sequence, "things went together like a said Rinderknecht. "It was a matter of job or- ganization, and an enthusiastic crew." Including time lost for rain, the sequence lowered the time required per floor from the projected five days lo an av- erage of 3.6 days. Conslruction superintend- ents from Milwaukee, Chicago and Albuquerque have come to Cedar Rapids to examine Ihe sequence syslem, use of foremen and the resiillant speed gained. Ordinarily, on a job Ihe size of Ihe Cedar River Tower, pre- cast installation and place- ment of reinforcement rods Orchestra Is Seeking Commercial Sponsors LONDON leading British symphony orchestra, feeling the chill wind of infla- tion, is asking commercial firms to sponsor its concerts. It could lead to a new era of music in Britain, where commercial sponsorship is al present confined almost en- tirely lo sport. The Royal Philharmonic, in an appeal aimed at all British business firms, says il cannot fulfill all its artistic plans and remain solvent. London has five full-time than any other cily in Ihe world. Only one of these, the British Broadcasting Corp. (BBC) Symphony, is supported en- tirely by Ihe state. The other Royal Philharmonic, London Sym- phony, London Philharmonic and New Philharmonia, each receive a subsidy of more than pounds or a year from Ihe government- backed Arts council. Bui the Royal Philharmonic is still not paying its way. i A spokesman said it needs another pounds or a year to avoid bankruptcy without cutting its programs. The orchestra, founded in 1946 by the late Sir Thomas Bcecham, plays regularly at (he Royal Festival hall beside the River Thames, gives concerts in provincial towns, makes at least one overseas tour a year and gives special concerts for children and industrial workers. Rudolf Kempe is principal conductor. The orchestra is appealing to business men's hearts and heads. In a specially prepared booklet it asked firms to sup- port its concerts "for reasons of social but also tried to sell the idea as an advertising proposition. A spokesman admitted that this is nol easy. "If a commercial company sponsors a sports event, il can drape advertisements around (he arena and get a lot of valu- able publicity on the spokesman said. "Yon can't very well put advertise- ments around a concert plat- form, and symphony concerts are nol television material anvwav." Gazette Photos bv Tom Mcrrymon Supervisors on the 25-story Cedar River Tower devised a sequence system which cut the project- ed time of five days for pouring one level to an average of 3.6 days. Sidewalk superintendents marveled at the speed with which the structure progressed skyward. Occupancy is scheduled for next May. 1. are sub-contracted. "We're keeps prodding the project, doing it ourselves, even Ihe After the May 1 deadline, (he said Rinderknecht. contract calls for a "This also helps the mo- day penalty, mentum cause il belter he said. "I think it says something' of the projecl he- gives you a litlle about the quality of workers in the Cedar Rapids area when a general contractor can come in and doesn't have to do much sub-contracling. II says something fnr the local crafts." There is one other incen- live. Rinderknecht says, that But, unless unusual cir- cumstances such as a materi- als shortage or weather in- tervene, he is confident the timetable will be met. "Pulling up one of Ihesc takes a certain amounl of closeness between said Webb, an amicable 40- year veteran of the construc- tion business. "It even amazes me." Blacksmith Keeps Busy With Restoration Work WELLS, Maine (UP1) said. "I worked an hour on It The Harvester tractor this morning, worked on the had spent its autumn days muffler, and I might not touch running a sawmill in Gorham it again for a week." before the owners drove her Chick is 71 and has had his into Ihe woods lo die 14 years blacksmith shop for 25 years aso. and he's clone cfuile a lol of The traclor was pretly well work for Stevens. "He has a corroded when Lester Stevens lot of farm and road equip- found it and hauled all seven ment over al Ihe museum, a Ions of it oul and lurneri il lot of steam-and gas-powered over to Waldn Chick, Ihe equipmenl, and I've done a lot blacksmith from Wells. of work for him fiver (he The machine is silting out- he said, side Chick's blacksmith shop When he's nol working on now and when Ihe restoration the Harvester, Chick does a work is done it will join other little welding and some wood- old farm equipment al Sle- working in addition to his vens' museum at Ogunquit. blacksmithing. "I started working on it last "I do a lot of customwork March, but I haven't worked for the he said. "I steady on it, only when 1 do one thing one day and a little lime lo put in." Chick something else the next. Gambling Urge Sweeps Sweden .STOCKHOLM (tiPI) Sweden is no Mnntc Carlo, neither is il a Las Vegns, bill gambling here is a mul- timillinn dollar business and miisl rif il is legal. There is hardly a restaurant in Stockholm and other cilics which docs not sport at least a one-armed roulette wheels spin in nlhers anil licensed bingo parlors operate from morning until night. A conservative estimalc drawn together through various sources, including Swedish tax authorities, the police and the lollcry board, shows that Swedes legally fork out about 'i billion krnnor fabout million) a year for g.imhling In a country whose popula- tion is H million, thai is about a year for each man, woman and child. The most popular forms of gambling arc Ihe soccer pools, horses, bingo and the number lotteries. Lagging somewhat behind are the slul machines and the roulette wheels. Reflection, Refraction Causes Rainbows Rainbows are caused by the reflection and refraction of sunlight from water drops in clouds or fog. Refraction caus- es light, passing from air to water and back lo air, to be broken into Ihe component colors which make up white light, the World Almanac notes. A secondary rainbow has its color sequence reversed. RATES PAID ON Airt Crrllficali' Mln. mo. Term Years All inlerest is paid quarterly. Monthly income checks available on all certificates. All accounts insured up by FSLIC. A SUBSTANTIAL PENALTY IS REQUIRED FOR EARLY WITHDRAWAL OF CERTIFICATES: savings loan association OUR MONTICELLO OFFICE IS NOW OPEN 1135 7th Avenue. MARION 111 East hi Street, MOHTICELLO 100% Acrylic...styled by Centerfold Sweater Knit Pant Suit 36.00 Check into this smart throo pioco pant suit for work or casual wear. Acrylic button down cardigan swoatnr lops a sloovnloss turtlonock sholl teamnd with chocked pant. Choicn styling in navy or groon. 8 lo 16, Cedar Rnplcli: Downtown Sacond Floor and Plata Iowa City: Mall Shopping) Cantor on Six at   

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