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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 13, 1974 - Page 8

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 13, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                8____Tne Odar Rapids Gazelle: Frl., Sept. 13, 1971 The Youno a a a 0 VoIP S B 9 a UPI Tctcohoto Age is no concern when you have things to do, as Beulah Jenkins, 75, can attest. The Spring- field, III., woman has been earning a living for the past 30 years cutting weeds in the city. She plans to work for about three more years and then "sit in my rocking chair and get my knitting out." Maneuvering a tractor over steep hillsides and soggy ravines can be risky but according to Beulah, "I like to experiment-see what I can do." The Youngest And five-year-old Stephanie Perryman of Smyrna, Ga., keeps her- self busy building and flying model airplanes. At right, she puts the finish- ing touches on one of her creations in the basement workshop of her grandfa- ther's home. Stephanie won the national champi- onship for rubber band powered airplanes in Au- gust, competing with 30 contestants in the under 1 5 age group. She is the youngest member of the National Free Flight so- ciety's.hall of fame. Getty Married In Town Hall Ceremony SOVICILLE, Italy (UPI) .1. Paul Getty HI, 18, his long hair covering Ihe scars left by kidnapers who cut off his right ear, married a 24-year- old German divorcee Thurs- day night in a ceremony they vainly tried to keep private. The hippy grandson of American oil billionaire .1. Paul Getty, and the bride, for- mer model Marline Zacher angrily refused to kiss for the benefit of photographers who jammed the town hall of this Tuscan village of per- sons. The couple went to La Fu- serna, the villa of Getty's mother, where friends said they would spend most of their honeymoon. It was p.m. when the couple showed up at the town hall, besieged by photogra- phers who had traveled 140 miles from Rome. Getty, wearing a red-lined black suit and tennis shoes, kept his hands in his pockets. Getty's mother, Mrs. Gail Harris, attended the wedding with her other three children and Miss Zacher's twin sister. Miss Zacher's two-year-old daughter from her first mar- riage was not there. The couple's romance began in Rome, where both lived be- fore a gang kidnaped Getty July 10 last year and held him in southern Italian mountain hideouts for five months, cut- ting off his right ear Fresh Fruit Buckets For Any Occasion. Sill cello wrapped i t Cheery Bow Always Free Delivery to Either Hospital DALE'S FRUIT MARKET 3338 Center Pt, Rd. NE 364-33U A W Open 9 to 6 7 Days W. Bridge West Side Club Winners in a Howell move- ment game played Thursday at Welly-Way were: Bruce Thiher and Bruce Cuthbcrt- son, first, and Mrs. K.E. Henrikson and Mrs. W.E. Ey- man tied with Mrs. Thomas Mullin and Mrs. Howard Wilfong for second. The next game will be played al Sunday at Welly-Way. DEBORAH BARCUS FETED AT BRIDAL SHOWER Mrs. Norman Wassmer, Mrs. Albert Barnard and Mrs. Cecil Bunner were co-hostess- es to 16 guests at a bridal shower given Tuesday evening honoring Miss Deborah Bar- cus. The event was given at the home of Miss Barcus1 mother, Mrs. Ira 1. Barcus, 1366 Wilson avenue SW. Miss Barcus is the Sept. 21 bride- elect of Robin N. Glover. 4009 Oakland road NE, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Glover of Amarillo, Texas. GLYN W. HUGH FETED AT BIRTHDAY PARTY Glyn W. Hugh. 124H Nine- teenth avenue SW. was ho- nored al a birthday party Thursday evening al at Todd's Indian Mouse restaur- ant. Thirty-nine guests attend- ed. GET RID OF THAT FAT Low V or niorr c.l cxirv-. (ill without missing ,i uiih Ihis Plan lh.it hi-lp .shin down Tin1 X-ll Hfihicins i'l.inconiitms.iiiny I.'thlcl. easily ih.ii roni- hmes mfircdicni1- to Vllil- rnins No strenuous CMTUM- Ovor 5Wi million of X-ll i.iblcls ;ill over Amont.i Conip.iny fournlifl in ift2H X-ll Kcflucmg rusts fconomy (Jet X-ll Your money refunded m.intif.K Hirer if At most drug stores. Trudy Thompson Bride WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, Canada Trudy Swcnson Thompson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harlcy A. Swcnson of Solon, Iowa, was married to Jack Seitz Saturday in a 5 o'clock ceremony at Lutheran Church of the Cross. The Rev. William Raths officiated. The bridegroom is the son of Mrs. Frances Seitx Smerchanski of Medika. Man- itoba. Following the ceremony a reception and wedding dance for 150 guests was given at Ihe Kharluom temple. The bride wore an ivory gown of matte jersey styled with a high, rolled neckline! and belted at the waistline with a cummerbund. She wore a floral headpiece and carried an arrangement of flowers centered with an ivory Jaffet orchid. Her matron nf honor was Mrs. Barry and Mrs. Glenn Sears was bri- desmatron. They were attired in dusty-pink sleeveless eyelet gowns and mauve picture hats. Each carried a nosegay of pink and mauve asters. Mr. Sxumlanski was best man and Mark Ferguson was groomsman and usher. The couple chose the West Indies for their wedding trip. On return they will reside in Winnipeg. The bride attended the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls and was graduated from the American Institute of Business in Des Moines, Iowa. She ha? been employed by U.S. Attorney Evan Hultman of Waterloo, Iowa, and is presently em- ployed by the law firm of Aik- ins, MacAulay Thorwaldson. The bridegroom is employed by the Great-West Life Assur- ance Co. of Winnipeg. Golf TSImcrcsl Forty attended play .Thurs- day. Guest prize was won by Mrs. Robert Xirbel and other prixes were awarded to the Mines. Donald Hollihan, Burdell Humbert, E. 0. Spangler, Gregg Hilker, Frank Pfaff, E.E. Heinte and James Griffin. Committee members are Mrs. Harold Wioto, chairman, and Mrs. K.F. Stcpanek, co-chairman, Mrs. Gertrude Veldhouse and Mrs. Ray Moore. Darts League Bans Women's Teams DOI.GKLLAU, Wales (UPI) The local Darts league has banned women's teams be- cause they might create a haby-sitting problem for hus- bands already playing ball. beautiful, fresli Tell her how much you care on your Anniversary. Send her favorite flowers. KREBS FLOWER SHOP N 2424 I8th St. SW 363-2081 Society for Women Features i Sister Sye Case Typifies Korean Repression Plot By Fox Butterfield i York Times News SEOUL. Siiiilh Kiirwi Tin- men who' look Sister Sye Raymumlc I'niin her convent, in a black sedan never identified themselves. Nul even after three shifts of them inter- rogated her in a small windowless room fur 17 straight hours and nrdered her to sign a confession of anti-government activity' lliat could be punishable by death. But though they never told her whir they were, Sister Sye, a ,'iS-year-old Korean Rinnan Catholic linn, knew they were members of the Korean Central inlellinenco Agency. Fin- she was licit! in n squat, concrete Iwiilding known to almost every Korean as the name of the hillside on which Ihe intelli Heuce agency's headquarters were originally situated. The building is the agency's interrogation center. Trials Sister Sye is one nf dozens, possibly hundreds, nf South Koreans who have been taken from their homes or offices in recent weeks by the secret police for inter- rogation as part of President Park Cluing lice's effort to repress all opposition to his rule. The most dramatic part of Park's crack- down has been a series of closed trials before military courts in which Koreans in- cluding Protestant opposition politicians and the nation's best- known young poet. Kim Chi Ha have been convicted of subversion. A respccti-d 77-year- old former president of South Korea. Vim Pn Sun. is on trial. But to add to the terror and impact of the the government regularly detains, for periods of a day or more, seemingly almost anyone it is suspicions of. Among others taken for questioining by the intelligence agency recently wcrv the local Korean correspondent for the Kellers News Agency and the lawyer [or the most Kin. Daniel Chi Hak Sonn, an outspoken Catholic who is under indictment for subver- sion. Both the bishop and his aitlorney. hn Kuaug Kyn. are still liei'ig dctainied. The intelligence agency's harassment nf suspected political opponents takes oilier forms also. The secret police riintincly sla- lions agents in Protestant and Catholic churches to check on the content of sermons. An American Catholic priesl complained recently lltal Wn auenN INI! nnly lowed him after mass, lint had seh es into his Sister Sye's experience illustrated the usual process of detention mid iiiieslioning. though she was luckier than some because she was not physically tortured ami was re- leased after one day. But CIA agents told her she may lie called before a conrl-marlial soon to stand trial. An account of what happened to her has been put together from sources familiar with her case. Sister Sye herself, before she was permitted to leave the interrogation building, was forced to sign a document saying: "If 1 tell anyone about what happened here. I will certainly be punished." Her trouble began last month when she typed a defiantly worded statement denounc- ing the government's repressive rule that had been written by Bishop Daniel Chi Hak Sunn, who is under indictment for subver- sion. According to friends. Sister Sye is not a regular secretary, lint she was entrusted with the secret task because she is intelligent anil composed. A few hours after Bishrp Chi read the statement to a group of newsmen and Cathol- ic supporters, (lie Korean intelligence agents came to Sister Sye's convent to pick her up. Threatening Interrogation According to the account that has been pieced together, she was taken with no ex- planation I HI of her interrogators repeatedly asked her. in loud, often threatening tones, if she had typed the bishop's statement. To protect him. Sister Sye said she did not know, a lie that was In weigh on her conscience. So the agents reportedly began to mock her. "Why do yon live without a man'.' Why don't you Then as the night wore on and she became sleepy, a new team of agents warned her. "If yon weren't a nun and a woman, we would have beaten yon by now." Finally, the policeman took her to see Bishop Chi, who. it turned out. was being interrogated almost next door in room His face was Unshed, Sister Sye is said to recall, ami an empty tray sal on a table in front of him. The .bishop advised Sister Sye In admit that she had typed his statement and when she agreed she was returned to her own room. That was the last time any outsider has seen Chi. According to Catholic sources, he is believed to have been transferred to a remote hospital in par! nf the country under guard of Hie intelligence agency. Executive of Year Chosen by Group Richard Breeke, route one. Cedar Rapids, was designated "executive of the year" re- cently at a meeting of Women In Construction, chapter No. 160. Mr. Breeke, president ol B.G. Breeke, Inc., was nom inated by his secretary, Mrs. Chris Scholmann and selected for the honor by employers in the construction industry. The event took place at the Em- bassy club. At that same event. Mrs. Eugene Christensen. 1619 E avenue NE, was elected as WIC woman of the year. Selec- tion is based on a member's contribution to her field of work and also to the activities of WIC. Mrs. Christensen is president of the chapter and is employed by Metal Grafters, Inc. Richard Breeke Ohlhauser-Forde VWs Exchanged Miss Viola Lynn Ohlhaiiser, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ted a. John, 212 Eighth avenue was married to Leslie' Gene Fnrdc during a 2 o'clock ceremony Wednesday 'at Olivet Presbyterian church. Officiating was -the Rev. Francis Roy King. The bridegroom is the son nl Merle Forde, 1238 Third sired NW. For her wedding the bride cihose a silver and white gown. She wore a full-length veil trimmed with pearls and sequins and her flowers were ttinitc miniature mums and ixink miniature carnations. Mrs. John St. John attended the bride as matron of honor and maid of honor was Linda (iirnicle. Bridesmaids were Helen St. John and Kelly Ofnlhauscr, sisters of the bride. They wore white lace- trimmed gowns in lavender, green and pink, respec- tively. Each held a single red rase. Best man was Larry Beam and groomsmen were Kenneth OSilhauser, brother of the bride, and Pal and Ray Re- gan. Ushers included Robert Olilhauser, another brother, and Gary Beam. A reception was given at the home of the bride's parents following Ihe ceremony. After a brief wedding' trip Inn newlyweris will reside at the Eighth avenue address. The. bridegroom is employed by Penick Ford, Ltd. Mrs. Forde By Abigail Van Huron DEAR ABBY: I am and my husband, Walter, is 52. Two years ago he had a heart attack, but he recovered and is now enjoying excellent health. Walter plays tennis at least three times every week, so he's not exactly an invalid, right? However, when it comes lo love-making, I am told not to "bother him" because he doesn't want lo lake any chances on damaging his heart. Before his coronary, he wasn't the world's greatest lover, but now has an excuse. (Or has Please ask one of your med- ical consultants and lei me know. Don't advise me to ask Walter's doctor because he is also Walter's tennis buddy. Thanks. MISSING SOMETHING DEAR MISSING: I consult- ed Dr. Donald B. Efflcr, the famous Cleveland clinic heart surgeon, who is cooler than Dcnton Coolcy and hotter than Michael DcBakcy. His re- sponse: "II Walter, age 52, is enjoying regular tennis, but will not take care of his home- work, three possibilities come to mind: (A) Walter's got something going on the out- side; (B) Walter's wife has lost something that must have looked good to him a number of years ago or, (C) Walter Is one of those rare men who los- es interest in sex at 52. In any event, judging from his wife's letter, Walter's past heart attack is most likely a phony excuse. "Very few coronary patients are advised against sexual activity at home. This simple observation, made long ago, gave rise to the aphorism, There's nothing dangerous about sex, it's the chasing alt- er it that can kill you1." DEAR ABBY: Tell that small-town bartender that he doesn't have lo lie. If someone phones the bar and asks if Joe Blow is there, all he has to do is page Joe Blow by calling his name loudly. If Joe Blow doesn't want to answer the page, it's his busi- ness. That way the bartender isn't in the middle. LADY BARTENDER DEAR LADY: Leave It to t, lady to figure out how lo keep from getting in the middle. Everyone has a problem. What's yours? For a personal reply, write to AI1BY: Box No. 69700, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self- addressed envelope, please. NEAR VOW I ec 6% 6% DIAMOND ACCOUNT COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY! Open wilh just S500 nnrl Keep al lojsl thir, amount to h Inlorost paid riaily Irom nt mvi.'slmpnl Jusl i50 minimum on additions lo this .icr.ount AMnr First parlor allowiblo tiurmii lirM 10 il.iys of 
                            

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