Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 13, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Odar Haplds toctle: Krl., Sept. 13, 1971 5 Federal CB Crackdown Seen By Charles DBS MOINES (AP) Federal audits will track down on Illegal use of citizen band ra- dios in Iowa by truckers within a few weeks, according lo a Rovcrnmcnt lawyer. Iowa's first and only crackdown, the week ni Aug. 11, netted nine alleged violators, said first Asst. U.S. Ally. James Rosonuaurn. "Some of those cases should be disposed Pretty he said, adding that at least two of (hose arrested "said they would plead What local agents and Federal Communi- cations Commission investigators will be looking for is operation of the radios without proper licenses and not using proper broad- cast call letters. Authorities have said some over-the-road truck drivers use citizen band radios to alerl each other to weigh stations that are In op- eration, or the location of police speed checkpoints. Officials are concerned about the use of radios to "avoid the Iowa speed Ro- senbaum explained, "and not broadcasting in plain language. "Authorities do not consider 'Smokcy the Bear1 and 'chicken coop' plain language." Smokey the Bear Is jargon for police and chicken coop is a code for a weigh station where authorities determine if truckers' rigs carry too much weight. There were four FCC agents in Iowa dur- ing the August Investigation, Roscnbaum said agents summoned from Kansas City and as far away as California. He did not know how many agents would be assigned to the new effort and would not specify what date had been selected for the crackdown. The FCC agents use monitors to listen in on citizen band brodcasts, the attorney said, and to determine the location of the' people using the gear. They also determine if what they hear is In violation of the law. "This is the first place in.the country where this type of thing was never Roscnbaum said. Alcoholism Unit's Goals Are Outlined CHEROKEE (UPI) The acting director of the newly organized state alcoholism commission said here Thurs- day the new agency will give Iowa a comprehensive ap- proach to treating state resi- dents with drinking problems. Acting Director Juris Pon- tius said the new state com- mission, created by the 1974 Iowa legislature, combines all the previously-existing alco- holism treatment authorities in the state. He said the old Iowa commission on alcoholism and the alcoholism authority In the state office of planning and programming are being ab- sorbed by the new agency. Pontius said the two agen- cies previously in existence often had "conflicting and duplicating but he said the new agency offers a comprehensive approach under the state health depart- ment. "The new agency has more authority and responsibility for a more unified and comprehensive alcoholism treatment program In Iowa and increases the appropria- tions considerably from the previous Pontius said in an interview. Pontius and other slate offi- cials were here Thursday to explain the new alcoholism commission and its programs to Cherokee area residents, law officers and social work- ers. He said similar meetings will be held around Iowa. The acting director said the meetings give persons an opportunity to give comments and criticisms of the commis- sion's operations ind also offer a chance to make suggestions on improving its work. Commission Structure Set for Waste Disposal Rates, Contracts ELY- The Linn County Municipalities Assn. has voted to let a landfill commission work with the county board of supervisors to set rates and draw up 'contracts for the cit- ies' use of the county solid waste disposal site. Meeting in Ely Thursday night, the association decided the commission will consist of one representative from each of the municipalities partici- pating and a member of the board of supervisors. A sub-committee chosen from the commission will serve as an executive com- mittee to maintain close scrutiny over the operation of the landfill site at (he county home farm. Operating Own Presently, only three of the county's 17 municipalities arc using the landfill, which is a state approved site (Marion, Palo and The Law Enforcement Funds Approved for Buchanan By Donna Jones INDEPENDENCE The Iowa crime commission has approved a allocation for a Buchanan county com- munications project which will provide equipment for the new proposed joint law en- forcement center for opera- tions of the Buchanan county sheriff's office and Independ- ence police department. The approval was made Wednesday, according Don Parrish, Independence, vice- chairman of the Northeast Iowa crime commission. Cost of the communications equipment, Will include radio equipment for the In- dependence police anad sher- iff's patrol cars, will run about The remaining will be paid by Ihc city and county. Buchanan county voters at Ihc June primary election gave their approval to spend for a new law enforce- ment center building, to be constructed north of the Buchanan county courthouse. The new 56-by 66-foot un derground facility will adjoin the courthouse. One-half of the cost is ex peeled to be federally funded and the remainder from local funds. Parrish said plans and spec- ifications for Ihe building arc now awaiting approval from the federal civil defense divi- sion. Once approved, officials will advertise for bids on the building. Akers, Samuels to Central City Posts CENTRAL CITY Voters here elected Jerry Akers for the three-year term on Ihe school board and Bernard Samuels for the one-year term. John Erbes was elected treasurer. The two-and-one-lialf mill levy for a ten-year period for repair and remodeling build- ings was approved. Culver Urges Openness by Soviets in Grain Dealings Itv Dorothy Williams WASHINGTON, D.C. The Soviet Union "must be com- pelled to deal openly and fair- ly in the market" if, as re- ported, il once again tries lo buy American wheal, Rep. John Culver (D-Iowa) said Thursday. Culver urged that Agricul- ture Secretary Earl Butu "promptly call in the Soviet negotiators and warn them that the congress will move to block future sales unless they agree, firsl, to an overall lim- itation on their wheat and other grain purchases this year, and second, to report all sales transactions to the de- partment as they occur." The Cedar Rapids Democrat made the recommendations to a house foreign affairs sub- committee as he leslificd in supporl of food aid proposals made by Ihe foreign economic policy subcommittee he heads. Limit Sales II is necessary to limit wheal sales to Russia "lo avoid the stceply-inflalionary experience of Iho last Soviet wheat deal. "Open dealing is required to assure that all of our farm- ers and not just the major grain companies are awaro of market effects." Culver said the United States department of agricul- ture monitoring controls In- stalled after Ihc 1972 Soviet wheat purchase are loo gener- al and fall "to disclose export destinations or even the Ident- ity of What's more, he added, the Soviets have refused lo ix-rmil reasonable inspection of Ihelr own 1974 ernps. He also look Issue with earlier leslimony of an Over- seas Development Council economist calling for a cut- back in meat consumption. Beef To Table "We need to move more beef to the dinner table, not Culver said. To relieve the livestock emergency, we should move to increase grain crops next year, he said, add- ing: "This will require an in- crease in the existing targel price and loan rale to offset increased production costs, as well as emergency and ex- tended soil conservation ass- istance to restore the effects of Ihis year's erosion. "We must also reduce and reallocate non-cssenlial ferti- lizer applications and do ev- erything possible to expand fertilizer production, both in this country and abroad." GAZETTE TELEPHONE NUMBERS For Newt, Sports, Bookkeeping, General Inlor motion ond Offices Not listed Below Cifcutolion-Subunplmri Dept......398-8333 Mon. ihruSol, 8 a.m. to 7p.m. Sundays Unlil 12 Noon Holiday! 11 a.m. lo p.m. WanlAdi 398-8234 Man. thru Fii. 8 a.m. lo 5 p.m. Saturday until 12 Noon Display Adverliiing..... 398-8222 8a.m. loSp.m. Motion Office 398-8430 FREE with deposit! YOIIV choice of three eloKaiit, .styles KKKK willi (nullifying deposit in ;i Kirst National Savings Account ur (Vrlfflriilr of Deposit. Additional tfohU-ts available nt beautifully reduced prices. Slnrt your colled ion loday! (Limit, nne free icll't per family.I First National Bank of Marion other municipalities are op- crating their own sites, or renting private ones. However, by July 1, 1975, the state department of en- vironmental quality has re- quired .that all municipalities and rural residents haul waste only to state approved sites. Still to be worked out by the commission are such items as how fees will Ije charged, whether by volume, weight, gate fees or per capita permit tecs. Agreements Other items to be decided include weighted voting, and whether cities in the southern part of the county can work out agreements with Cedar Rapids for use of the larger cities' disposal site. Most representatives of the municipalities present agreed that the commission would continue to give them a voice in Ihc establishment of policy for the operation of the land- fill. The county engineer's off- ice will be in charge of the day to day supervision of the landfill. Some Balked However, some representa- tives balked at committing themselves to signing con- tracts or even giving verbal agreements without knowing cost estimates. Most of the members of the advisory commission have al- ready been chosen by the cit- ies, and will meet sometime within the next month in an effort lo work out some of the details. The next meeting is sched- uled for Oct. 10, and candi- dates for county and slate off- ices will be invited to attend. Linn County Clinii For Well-Elderly In Center Point CENTER POINT-A Well Elderly clinic will be heli here -for Linn county resident over BO years of age starting Oct. 11. The clinic will provide a screening process and healtl counseling service by the Linn county public health nurses Screening tests include blooc pressure, urinalysis, nemo globin, and tuberculin skii tesls. It will be held once monthly every second Friday from to noon. No appoinlmenl wil be necessary. The clinic will be held in the Center Point library locat- ed on highway 150. The fret services are not designed to lake the place of the family doctor, but lo supplement his services. Patients requiring medical attention will be re- ferred to their personal phyusician. The Community Health committee of the town's Community Betterment program and local Jaycees arc sponsoring the clinic. Transportation will be avail- able by making reservation: 24 hours in advance with SEATS 308-5605. Antique Show At Iowa City IOWA CITY An antique show and sale will ho held Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the national guard armory Iowa City, under the sponsor ship of (he Iowa Cily Kiwanis club. Tickets may he purchased at three downtown locations Bremcrs, Kirwan furniture and Wayner's or at Ihe door Sunday. FolhistlieBEST time to improve your lawn! For a greener lawn this fall and next spring, too! Scotts Promotes thicker, sturdier turf that resists weed invasions. Long-lasting feeding. Apply now for a better lawn this fall, and next spring, too. '2 off Sq. Ft. Bag Reg. S20.95 Now Toff Sq. Ft. Bag Rog. Now Moff Sq. Ft. Bag Reg. Now 13.45 It weeds your lawn as it feeds your lawn! Scotts 2 Controls dandelion, plantain, clo- ver and 38 other tawn weeds. Provides long-lasting fending for your grass, Satisfaction guaranteed or your monoy hack. Of I I Sq. Ft. Bug Reo. Now 27.95 Sq. Ft. Bag Reg. Now M9.45 S1off Sq. Ft. Now 9.95 CENTER lindale Plaza 393-8727 1 200 Etlzewood Rd. 363-35315 Mon.-Fri. 3-9. Sun. 11-5 Hon.-fri. 1-1, Sal. Sun. 11-5 J Killian's Lindale Plaza, Cedar Rapids and Mall Shopping Center, Iowa City TO OPEN SUNDAY Gals, get it all together with this great whistle-stopper! 100% Polyester Turtleneck Sweaters REGULARLY 10.00 Put together some of the greatest looks for fall and winter with one of these polyester turtlenecks. Ribbed sweaters have long sleeves and a 9 inch back zipper for ease in dressing. Choice of white, red, navy, black, brown or light blue. Sweaters are fully washable and fast drying for breezy care. Available in sizes small thru large. Aislo Bar, Downtown Stroot Floor and Downtown Socand Floor   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication