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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 12, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 12, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather-- n[ nilii to- night with IIIWK ill mid Ids. Clnuily Friday wllli highs In upper 5lls. VOLUME 92 NUMBER 2'lli CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12. CITY FINAL 15 CENTS ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES Prices Explode by u crcase was last August's jump nf (i.2 percent following the lift- ing of the government's freeze on prices. The government's Wholesale Price Index in August rose to WASHINGTON (AP) Wholc- SRle prices leaped 3.9 percent in August, the second biggesl monlhly increase in 28 years, Hie government reported Tliurs- Exploding prices last month percent higher than ranged across almost the entire [a year ago. The index is based economy. There were 1967 figures, meaning lhat it tial increases for everything S1B7.40 to buy at wholesale from farm products to industrial statistical variety of goods'that goods k'osl in the 1967-base period. Wholesale prices have risen All prices arc adjusted to ac- at an adjusted annual rate ofjcount for seasonal differences. 37.3 percent over the last three j Consumers seemingly can ex- months. The August rise of 3.9 ipecl little relief in the coming percent works out to a from Ihe worst inflation ing annual rate of percent.'m years since wholesale prices T usually are quickly reflected at Last August relail ,eve, Thc August increase in prices, Agricultural Rise -following a rise of 3.7 percent; ,M.liUng ils Hce Ule[ m July-was the second biggest ;labol. said agl.jcul- in any month since November duds wea, 7 1946, when prices jumped in Augusl. following a rise percent, 'liiu umy bigger jn a [decline in each of the four pre- ceding months. Industrial commodities con- tinued lo rise rapidly in price and- were up 2.5 percent in August, a rale only slightly (ban Ihe average monthly in- crease of 2.7 percent that has' prevailed throughout most of the senate passed a bill 85-0 Wedncs- i day. making (he 55-mile-an-hour Thc vehicles national speed limit permanent. II also went on record in fa- vor of killing lhc requirement lhat cars be equipped with an interlock system to prevent For Retaining 55-Mile Lid WASHINGTON (API The Moon Man Gift -Uel TClCPllOIO were slightly higher but do not yet rcflecl Ihe higher prices posted on new model cars that will be introduced in the fall. Consumer finished goods, Prime Minisler Harold Wilson, left, accepts a gift from James Irwin, Apollo 15 astronaut, as the lat- ter calls on the British leader in London. The picture includes a photo taken on the moon during Irwin's 1971 mission and a miniature British flag which the astronauts carried to the moon and back. them from starling unless scatjlnoife products in the wholesal bells arc faslened. [chain nearest retail outlets, rose! two percent. Foods, Feeds Truck Weight Thc measure also would in-' crease by 10 pcrcenl. Ihe max-} Sharply higher prices for imum allowable weight for [grains, livestock, oil seed and trucks on the interstate ex-1 processed food and feeds ac- prcssway system. counted for much of the rise in The bill now goes to the [agricultural prices last month. Processed foods and feeds were up 8.2 percent while raw farm products rose 0.7 percent to house. The present 55-mile speed limit is a temporary one, ex- piring .lime 30 next year. Ailvo- IPllsh over-all agricultural prices cales til making it permanent 7-G percent at wholesale last said that it not only had saved [month. Shoppers can expect more price hikes ahead at supcr- The question ofthe inlerlock markets wilh llle 'T2 svslem was raised in an amend-! foods last large amounts of gasoline but also had saved main' lives. Crew Flees Sharpened for Fire Aboard pund Luxury Liner (AP) A KEY WEST (AP) Flames house subcommillec intends lo erupted aboard the luxury j (rim Ihe request for liner Cunard Ambassador Nixon's transition lo day, lorcing most of the 290 private lile, the panel beau crewmen lo scramble onto life .says. boats lowered into Ihe Gulf of[ "You can safely say il will be [cut said Chair- man Steed (D-Okla.) of the ex- ecutive offices appropriations inenl. sponsored by Senators Buckley, (C-R-N.Y.) and Eagle- Ion lU-Aloj, which staled '0! lire- grocery no such device could be required by federal aulo safely officials. Thc amendment was adopted in price chiefly as ii result of increases for meals. Mexico. Within two hours, a rescue vessel was plucking (.he crew- men out of (heir rafts and boals, bobbing in gentle swells about 39 miles soul Invest of Key West. There were no immediate re- ports of injuries and the 480- lool liner was carrying no pas- sengers at Ihe time of the fire. Fifty firefighters remained aboard and the fire v.'as even tuallv controlled. subcom the ma era! dollars already spent in connection wilh his San Cle- menle and Key Biscayne, Fla., properties. KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) The leader of the French ex- pedition to Ml. Everest and five Sbcrpa guides were buried alive Rains Aid Iowa Corn Prospects By Al Swegle Iowa farmers may produce their fourth billion bushel corn crop, despite a host of natural calamities lhal, have besieged producers Ihis year. The agriculture department's !estimate of Iowa's corn yield [soared 35 million bushels j Wednesday to 1.034 billion bush- els and 81) bushels an acre. lirnke Droulh The four percent upward revi- sion came following rains which broke the drouth during the early part of August, Iowa Crop Reporting Service officials told The Gazette. But the latest estimate does not take into account the effects of an unusually early frost which hit scattered localities in the northwestern part of the state Sept. 3 and 4. The latest estimate, if it ma- terializes, is still 14 pcrcenl below what farmers in the Tal Corn stale produced last year [and 16 percent below the recorc crop of 1.229 billion bushels pro- duced two years ago. This month's yield estimate o bushels per acre is 20 bushels [below last year's yield and 2f bushels below the record yiek set in 1972. Soybean Production Soybean production in Iowa is forecast at 212.1 million bushel Sampson also teslilieri an HvatwncVic Miat. Hwo.pt 1 away two camps and forced the had assured him, speaking for Nixon, that none of Ihe funds timbers to abandon their al- would be used by Ihe former- lempf lo climb Ihe world's high- 21 percent less lhan the record million produced last year. The expected yield of 30 bush els per acre is lour below the yield last year and six1 bushels below the record yield set in 1972. President for any legal defense, [cst peak, the Nepal foreign He said Announced Thursday. mmittee, which took up equipment would slay at San The mjnisl ava. atter Thursday. Uemcnle until Nixon decided down ,.ne "The paring knife will be working all Ihrough Ihis thing." Steed said many congressmen "don't want lo approve a nick-! ci" for Nixon because of Pres- ident Ford's pardon for him. But he said Nixon, as well as any other funnel President, de- serves transilion money and he hopes his subcommittee can cul not lo use (lie office, or until his and oils, a small crew, reached HIC-JI so well justified H-21 but then reconsidered processed poultry and [scene shortly after Ihe congress will approve it. opes of Everest on Monday, two days afler Ihe team of French pro- fessional mountaineers had j pitched Iheir third major camp at feet on (heir way to- ward Ihe 29.028-foot summit. The avalanche swept awayiporting Board said. ;eS8s- withdrawn by its sponsors. Other Legislation They did Ihis wilh the planalion (hat (he subject is being considered in oilier legis- lation now in conference be-i tween Ihe senate and house. BuMThii rsd ay convicted Miirniskvh.cn the first distress they said the vole put the senate Wayne Chcn'aull of Ihc murder icamu. cx_j Found Guilty of Mrs. King Death abandoned ship. It was unable to get close lo the liner because it was carrying aviation gaso- line. The nearcsl ship capable of {helping fight Ihe flames was Blocks Fair Trial WASHINGTON Former Attorney 2- lh( Mitchell asked Thursday lhat his i Potion I e a d c r, 33-year-old Walergale cover-up indictment ic'onllti Devoussoux of Chamonix be dismissed because Ihc lhc r've Shcrpas. the an- Iremcly prejudicial effect" nouncemcnl. added. Ihc pardon' granted Richard i The depuly expedition leader, "This is an emotional makes a fair Irial Payol, quickly ordered Sleeri said. "Unless we're ablejsiblc. j" lo bring out a tight, well-1 Mitchell, Ihrough his lawyers. documented bill. il. will be lhal. Nixon has "unavoid-j NAIROBI. Kenya (AP) Mil- tary reformers pledged to de- mocracy and a new deal for the )easants Thursday deposed Ern- peror Haile Selassie, the world's Idest and longest-reigning mon- arch, and put him under arrest. The 13-man military commit- ee thai has been running Ethio- pia for several months said it was recalling the emperor's 58- year-old son, Crown Prince Asfa from Switzerland and would make him a figurehead (ing without any authority. However, the prince suffered a stroke nearly two years ago. A friend in Geneva said he is still partially paralyzed and ipends much of his time in the hospital. En Eoute The prince's son, Zero Yakob, whom Selassie designated earli- er this year as his successor as emperor, was believed en route to Geneva from Oxford universi- ty in England to see his ailing father. Rcsidenls of Asmara, Ethio- pia's second largest city, report- ed that crowds rejoined in the streets when news spread that Selassie was overthrown. An eyewitness said Selassie was taken away in the back seat of a blue sedan. The announcement that Selas- sie was deposed was made by the 13-man Armed Forces Coor- dinating Committee. II said parliament was closed, the constitution suspended, 'that troops were forming a provi- sional government and that ci- vilian cabinet ministers were asked to 1'emain in their posts. Civilian Rule It said church and state would The agriculture department's prediction for the corn crop na- tionwide was revised upward slightly Wednesday and was slill II percent below last spring's estimates. Based on indications Sept. 1, Ihe 1174 crop is estimated at 4.M4.730.000 bushels, up 29 mil- lion from Ihc forecast a month ago, Ihe department's Crop Re- "Knioliuual Thing" the assault on Everest balled. ATLANTA (API A jury [more (ban Ihrce hours away serious (rouble. And, from Ihe ably implied" his own guilt by Prayer Hill WASHINGTON (AP Sena- on record in favor of eliminating last June of Mrs. Martin Lulhcri The liner, built in 1972 left over in the senate, I the pardon and leavesilw Helms iR-N. C.) has intro- it may be in serious (rouble.prospective jurors with Ihe im-jduccd a bill designed to ove.r- the inlerlock, which was manda-jKing. sr., and a church deacon. [Miami at p.m. Wednesday Ihe 197-1! The jury after further was enroule lo New Or- -alion decreed Ihe death penalty leans lo pick up cruise passen- lory starting wilh models. The new truck limits would I for Chenaull. permit maximum weights of up In pounds nil vehicles on thi1 wilh the gers. (here, loo." Me referred lo a scnale equally guilty." priations subcommittee hearing! Wednesday at which Chairman Up Slightly The soybean crop was esti- mated al' bushels, up slightly from the August forecast. But Ihe report said Ihe harvest will be 16 percent less than last year's.. As ingredients for livestock feed, corn and soybeans are the lion being readied under mili- tary supervision, and that, it would provide for a free press and a representative civilian government. Unofficial estimates put Selas- sie's weallh abroad at bil- ion, making him one of the world's richest men as well as ruler of one of the world's poorest countries. But Selassie reportedly con- ended that much of his wealth las been distributed among his children and cannot be reco- vered. An American eyewitness said poultry and dairy products. Both crops were delayed by too much jprcssion lhat his subordinates turn the supreme court ruling pounds nil vehicles ill I II C. I r interstate compared LODOr iie preesnl M on toy a (D-N.M.l told (ho j General Services Administration chief. Arthur Sampson, he was "given a snow job" by former Nixon iiidcs. ixon Gof Pleas By Aides for Pardons (Mil mill MlVUUrtJI-1 lill: III l r i J I. -i r ii i r i a detachment of troops moved major building blocks for meat. from his marble-lined palace in the central Addis Ababa and took him to the headquarters of the s summer ,Fourth army division, a ram- Thc delayed planting last near h the railroad tracks. Troops were deployed at key points. The city had been put under a night-time curfew at spring means polential trouble now from killing frosts. Some damage In corn in the upper Midwesl was reported last week and if more weather comes before corn and soybeans p.m. Wednesday. Slay Indoors Ababa was reported but. Western embassies foreign residents to stay 3 hnlv sre rde ,lary policy, allocalum of credit boll, requests and deeply, Oldy (1 e v h" u mhnl Wednesday Ihe lo hard-pressed induslncs such Ihe lone and character) MI. w I c -on e n h-v Samnson lhat a spe- Mu- pleas. lASKefl oiiiiii minj II said Nixon was especially! Anm'hPr provision of the 5' under Ihe'H-' hils ;''S" million loi nf conlinuing (ask', forces lo walch probl.'in areas sophi The labor leaders Ihc economy. alarm system and lhal Ihe gnvernmenl's anli-infla-: I'riiieipal Cause have live guards hired al a eosl...... Armed Forces Coordinat- 'inmillee, a group of anon- officers who have been mnvcvcr. crop (i im vere slow ,n recovering from k 8 of 4, ml, dry wealber m July the cmperor and the feu- eonditions in many areas are whn with slill only lair. .._ agreemcnl lor safeguarding described as Thursday urged Pres- linshel Average The report said Ihe 1OT coin (Continued: Page Col. Today's Index Cro.ssw'ird Daily Record Deaths Kdilorial Features Farm Financial .Marion Movies SwiHv Sports Stale Television liipes over Ihe nexl five lanlaiiiounl f harvest is expected lo average1? blackmail. II said one source: '78.3 bushels per acre, compared he "nl11 77.R foricasl in Aupisl and Nixon lo jail if he'and appeals run Iheir course. lasl year. policies iiri' not working Murray Miller. m diiln'l gel a pardon." Tin; resolulion, approved by a Soybean yields were put al i s I may plunge Ihe niunlry (reasnrer of (he Teamslers, saidj Ilaldeman's lawyer. John s.lys 25.1 bushels' per acre, the same) t [i ii severe recession considers high inlercsl rales told the Post he was un-'w indicated in Augusl. An I h unemployment. j the principal cause ol t of any pardon request craj-p of 27.8 bushels was bar MeanvCiill and he foresees a "crippling did no. Ix-lieve thai an, ho nal.on s hf-sl the picssion" unless policies are .ideniiin would use a Ihrealening nf I'-.nning Ihe hulh ._ ___________..... M........ i____i ..r .I.- i i ;SOI11( SC( IIM IUII I ill (MIKt. I 1.. George Meany. head of theChanged. because of his Wiilcrgale is Ihrough 23 I'oniplimenlcd Ford: chainiiiin Arthur Burns of Ihe "n kindl-v alliludc" linvard lid 'for being willing In listen and Federal lieserve Board said of fed-' Nixon. Seniilor Hughes ilVlowal op- Mrs. Maldeiniin said in Cali- posed Ihe resolulion because "1 forma thiil her husband could am not willing or ready to vole 28 called lor "new Ihinkmg, new would lake Ihe labor leaders' 21 ideas and new directions." views on lighl money inlo eon- 12-11 "Wr''ve been going downhillisideralion. 19-22 -for five and a-half yc.-irs iinderl "II is very interesting In know I.S lhc presenl economic they Siiul The secret of dealing sue- inol In discuss land that he does not have Ihe 15.01 al 2 p.m. Thursday 211 .we have nl this opcrnlcs independently of! cosslully wilh ii child is not to mailers. righl (o granl mercy lo declines oulnuinbered gains :i2-37 .Meany said. jlhe While House in lip his parent i Khrliehman nmld not be he mav deem proper In receiv belieu1 cuts, higli inoncy supply policies. reached tor comment Mini nifM'ev." Dow Figure I Down 15.01 YOIiK (AFM The 1 p ill w is in I on Ihe New Vork Slock Excha HAILE SELASSIE   

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