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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 6, 1974 - Page 3

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 6, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                WtAtfMtlt to 7AM 7 74 30.00 Rain is expected Friday night from the eastern iSulf Coast through parts of the Ohio- Tennessee valley to the Atlantic coast and in parts of the upper Mississippi valley. Mostly fair elsewhere. Denver Dululh Honolulu Houston The Weather Extended Partly cloudy Sunday through Tues- day. Highs in 70s and lows most- ly in 50s. Hiqti tcmoeralurcs Thursday, low tem- neraturcs overnirjhl and Indies of pre- cMlalton: Anchorage 67 4S L. Angeles 89 6? Atlanta ...4; so .u Miami ....es n .33 Bismarck .75 52 .09 Min'aootis 72 50 Chiclqo .66 56 N'. Orleans 83 73 ....87 53 New York 72 59 ....66 47 Phoenix ..103 81 72 .19 Seattle ....75 59 ...77 59 Washington 74 65 .07 C. R. Weather High Thursday ...............69 Low overnight ...............52 Noon Friday .................liS 2 p.m. Friday ...............70 Precipitation..............None Total for September ........0.25 Normal for September .....3.97 Normal through Sept......27.12 Total for 1974 ..............38.35 Barometer, falling .........30.22 Humidify al noon ............03 Wind direction and velocity al 2 p.m. SE al 11 mph.' Sun rises Saturday, 0.38; sun sets, Year Ago Today High, 75: low, 57; rainfall, none. Traveler's Forecast SATURDAY Weather, Hi-Lo Bismarck ......PtCldy 71-50 Chicago .......PtClriy 80-59 Cincinnati .....PICldy 7S-59 Cleveland ...PICldy 73-5-1 DCS Mninc.s .PICldy 77-57 Detroit .-.......Fair 77-58 Indianapolis ...PICldy 75-.% Kansas City .PtCldy 82-63 Milwaukee ___PtCldy 74-54 Mpls.-Sv. Paul .PtCldy 7H-.W Omnlia ..........Fair 82-58 St. Louis ......PtClriy 81-58 Sioux Falls ___PICldy Mississippi Stages (Flood stages In brackets) LaCrosse (12) 4.9, no change Lansing (18) 8.1, no change Dam 9 (18) 12.0, fall .1 McGrcfior (18) 0.4, no chanRC OuUcnbcrg (15) 3.G, fall .1 Dubuque (17) li.9, rise .1 Davenport (15) 4.0, fall .3 Kcokuk (10) rise .2 Cedar at O.K. (13) 3.48, fall .111 Coralville Lake Pool level Friday ......885.19 Births Mercy Sent, fi Mr. an dMrs. David SUistny, 700 Thirty-fifth street, Marion a chuiRhter. Births St. Luke's Sent. 5 To the families of Michael Ellinll, Hiawatha, a son; Phil E. Tisuc, 23GO Towne House drive NE, a daughter; Leonard Timni, Rue lane NW, a daughter. Out of Town Births At DCS Moines Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Butters a daugh- ter, Sept. 5. Butters is the son of Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Butters, B28 Third avenue SW. Marriage Licenses Sally Edwards and TMerlyn Rowley, Mary Thompson and .lames Hoss, Sharon .loncs and .lames Fuller, all nf Cedar Rapids. Linda Cairns, Hia- watha, and Alvin Sollkup. Toddvillc. Marriages Dissolved Jeane 1C. and .lames M. Wanner. Linda fi. and .lobn .Inscpli ZicUnski. Kvel.vn F. and William O. Clarke, .loannelte Ann and Kdwaril Henry Wick- ham, .lanice M. and l.nn 1C. Scriven. Fires a.m. Thursday. Ashes to rubbish at 'IVenl.v-ninlh slrenl SW. p.m. Thursday. Invcs- ticalr mlor ,il IM.'I Finn 111 streel. NW. 1-tm a.m. Friilav. Vcnl EIIS (Mini- fnini liiill'lim: al H-ickfiml road KW. Court Slimline Slciilicn Stan- fnnl .Smiunrr rirclr NK; Kvai'h. lliavviilha: Shirley Haley, SpniiKvill'-; SMn- ck, '.Spriniivillr; Mark 1'iirt, Kprinnvillc; Lawienrr SCMI, .iliilll I'nrlmi'w com I SIC. .li'rry llmiliin, Indi'pnidi'mv; each fined S30 and John Uchylil, 2056 First avenue NE; Jeffrey Mebel, 1270 Third ave- nue SE; Darrcll Busch, Shclls- hurg; Edward Welhelm, Atkins; Daryl Zerbee, 71G E avenue NW; each fined and costs. Right-of-way violation Hazel Schneider, 2257 C street SW; lined and costs. Velma Simoons, 2279 C street SW; fined and costs. Traffic siymil violation Pamela Thompson, 921 F ave- nue NW; Allen Kemp, Palo; Lindsay Lee, Maplcwood drive NE: Barton Haigh. Man- chester; each fined and cosls. Driver's license violation Kevin Paulsen, Alburnett; fined and costs. School slop siffn violation Lcona Rocarck, 208 Ninth street fined and costs. Strikinpr unattended vehicle Paula Taggart, Wcsl Park trailer courl; fined and costs. Attempt lo elude police JGrcgor.v Conner, 1123 K ave- luc NW; fined and costs. Vehicle control violation Charles Paciuct, 2811 Henry NW; fined and costs. Intoxication Larry Louke- a. Hiawatha; fined and costs. Fa-iilly equipment Robin Ilarlgravc, 1006 Dover street NE; fined and costs. Truck route violation Raymond Tensley, Davenport, fined and costs. Iowa Deaths AVyomins; Scott McDonald, Saturday at Wyoming Mclhodisl church. Haydcn's. Traer Gary Adamck, 33. Saturday at Overtoil's. Tama. Lyle .1. Lckin, 54. Harrison's. K a Ion a Vera Ellen Schrock, 80. Saturday at Lower Deer Creek Mcnnonilc church. Powell's. Toledo Frank C. Zimmer- man, (i7. Saturday al 11, First United Methodist church. Burial: Dysart cemetery. Hen- derson's. Clcrmont Mrs. Clarenrp (Beulah) Rear, (i2. Saturday at West Clcrmonl Lutheran church. Burnham and Bclln rininc Frances C. Vopalensky, 69. Monday at at Ihc. Methodist church. Burial: International cemetery, Lucerne. Visitation afler 15 Saturday al Halverson's. Dccnrah Martha Schrubbc, 88, died in South Lyori, Mich. Monday at 2 at Olson-Fjcl- stul's. Deep Ilivcr Daniel Cole, 21. Monday at, at Neven.- h oven's, Brooklyn. Burial: Community cemetery, Millers- burg. Blame Christians For Massacre ZAMBOANGA CITY, Philip- pines (AP) Men armed with bnlo knives and automatic rifles massacred Moslems, includ- ing women and children Thurs- day in an upland village 23 miles northeast of here, police said. Villagers described Ihe men as Christians. I.I. I'edro Francisco, police commander in Ibis port city 525 miles south of Manila, said one victim was shot and Ihe rest hacked lo death in Mala village, a few miles from where Mos- lem rebels ambushed a passeu, gcr bus Aug. 24. Authorities here said 2fi Chris- lians, including Iwo government troopers, were killed in the bus and 20 others were wounded. Francisco said it was proba- ble the Mala killings were in re- taliation for Ihe ambush. "I am afraid (here will be more sense- less he added. It Pays To Advertise Obituaries Walter L. Reitz Waller L. 117, formerly of Cedar Rapids, died in the owu Masonic home al Mattel- dorf Thursday. lie was horn March 25, 111117, it Sterling, III., and had been employed at Penick and Ford rom 1920 until 1941. While em- loycd there he managed the 'eniek and Ford baseball team n the Industrial league. Mr. ieilx. was a 50-year member of Crescent Lodge AF and AM, Jedar Rapids Consistory and was a life member of El Kahirj Shrine. Surviving are two sons, John, 'ortland, Ore.; Waller L. Reitz, r., Alexandria, Va.; a daugh- cr, Elizabeth Miller, Arlington Icighls, Va.; a brother, Charles Reilz, Cedar ..Rapids; two listers, Ada R. Crocker and Mary E. Rcllx., both of Los An- geles, Calif. Services: Turner chapel east Monday by Crescent odge. Burial: Linwood ceme- ery. Friends may call at Turner east. All Master Masons are asked to meet with Crescent odge al Turner casl at p.m. Monday to a Mend the ser- Linn District Judge James Barter has dismissed the appli- cation for post-conviction for convicted murderer Richard Zacck, as the judge in- dicaled in April he probably would. The dismissal, filed Friday, said that the defense mighl lave kept evidence out of a trial if it had attacked a search war- rant which the judge said was obtained by a false and inislead- ng affidavit filed by police. However, he went on, aftei Zacek .pled guilty, the right to make such a direct attack is waived. It was on the basis ol lhat theory that County Ally William Faches said earlier that he believed there was only a five percent chance that Zacek might get a new trial. Zacek's plea for a new chance at a trial was based on the county attorney's statement in a report on an investigation of the police department, lhat an ille gal search had been made at Zacck's residence. The .13-year-old Cedar Rapids man is serving n 75-year term in tbe penitentiary after being found guilty of second-degree murder. He had pled guilty to an open charge of murder in the death of 17-year-old Jean Halverson of Cedar 'Rapids. A report of a grand jury that indicted six men in connection wilh an alleged conspiracy to ruin the reputations of other police officers found lhat the Zacck search was "at least under color of right, and proba- bly legal in view of the fact that Zacek was aMhc time a parole violator and had waived his rights permitting a search of his premises. "Also, entry was probably made under exigent circum- stances, permitting warrantless search under the law of search and seizure." However. Judge Carter said Friday lhat because of a 1970 Iowa supreme court decision the state could not contend the search was legal as a result of Zacek's parole status. The judge referred to it as an illegal entry. He said that in fairness officers il should be noted that the events look place in 1969, before the cited decision, which was adopted in a 5-4 vole. An appeal of the Friday deci- sion is expecled In be made to the Iowa supreme courl. Israelis Refuse To Free Prelate JERUSALEM [AP) An Israeli district court Thursday refused to release Ihc Creek Catholic archbishop of Jerusa- lem on bail and also rejected his claim lhat he had diplomatic immimily and could not be tried on charges of .smuggling arms for Arab guerillas. .1 u d g e Miriam Bcn-Porath said Msgr. Milarion Capudji must remain in jail because "bringing arms and explosives info the country anil handing Hip-in over to Irrrorisls is Ion serious a mailer." Court officials said Msgr. Ca- pudji will he brought lo courl on Sept. 20 to plead In the charges, mid Ilie judge said the trial will begin "al the earliest opportnni- Iv." Mrs. Henry Wiegman Grace M. Wiegman, (13, widow of Henry Wiegman, 1953 B ave- nue NE, a Cedar Rapids resi- dent most of her life, died in Cedar Rapids hospital Friday Allowing a long illness. She was born Aug. 9, 1911, in Nebraska Mrs. Wiegman was a member of the First Lutheran church. Surviving are a son, Dr. Hugh Wiegman, Hays, Kan.; a daugh- ter, Mrs. J.R. Tomlir.scn, St. Paul, Minn., six grandchildren; two brothers, George Herring, alifornia, and Ed Herring of Colorado. Services: First Lutheran church at 3 p.m. Saturday by Dr. George W. Carlson. Burial: Oak Hill. Friends may register at Turner east until 9 p.m. Fri- day and at Ihc church after 10 a.m. Saturday. The casket will not be opened at any time. Mrs. Melvin Primrose Josephine Primrose, 55, wife of Melvin Primrose, 368 Nine- teenth street SE, a lifelong resi- dent of Cedar Rapids and a clerk in the Linn county treasur- er's office for Ihc last ten years, died in a Cedar Rapids hospital Thursday following a brie, illness. She was born April 5, 1919, ir Cedar Rapids and was marriec Dec. 24, 1948, in C e d a r Rapids. Mrs. Primrose was a member of the Church of the Brethren. Surviving in addition lo her husband are a son, Ronald; a daughter, Nancie, her mother, Elma While, all of 'Ceu'ai Rapids: a sister, Mildred Bowser, Norway; a brother, Leonard White, Ventura, Calif.; two stepdaughters, Mrs. .1. T. Dinncon, and Mrs. L.R. Morris, both of vScotldalc, Ariz. Services: Turner chapel casl at noon Monday by Dr. Wayne Shireman. Burial: Linwood. Friends may call at Turner casl after 1 p.m. Saturday. Memorial Services Vail, William Darrcl Fri- day at at Turner chapel west by the Rev. John M. Greg- ory. Burial: Cedar Memorial cemetery. Friends may call nt Turner west until 1 p.m. Fri- day. The casket will not. he opened after the service. Swchla, Gcortffi Richard Thursday at 3 p.m. at Turner chapel east by the Very Rev. Canon D. A. Lofcrski. Further services Friday al a.m. at Balik funeral home, Spill- villo. Burial: ZCB.T cemetery, Mill) a.m. Saturday at the Jancba-Kuba funeral home wcsl by the Rev. Charles H. Mchaffey, of the As- bury United Methodist church and Jan Hus loclfie of the IOOF. Ijiinal: National. JoSeph C. Lucas Joseph Charles Lucas, 70, of H5 II avenue Friday :ifler a long illness. Horn April 1, I SIM, in Iowa Cily, he lived :nosl of his life in Cedar Rapids. He was a member of SI. Pa- rick's Calholic church and a re- ircd machinist of Iowa Mami- 'acluring Co. Surviving are his wife. Fern; me daughter, Mrs. Kcnnetli Swanson. Cedar Hapids; Iwo grandchildren; a sister, Mary ipillman, and a half brother l-'rank Whilters, both of Cedar Rapids. Scryiccs pending at Teahcn funeral home. To Try Youth As Adult in Murder Case Kelly Johnson will be tried as an adult on a charge of murder- ing John Beving, Linn District Associate Judge John Siebcn- mann ruled Thursday. The Cedar Rapids boy is one of three persons ac- cused in the spooling death of Ihe 61-year-old man at the vic- tim's residence al 919 Sixth street SE Sunday morning. The other two, also of Cedar Rapids, are Eddie Ayers, 23. also known as Eddie While, and Steven Washington, 16. At his arraignment Friday Johnson had a preliminary hearing sel for Sept. 19 at p.m. Bond was set at and he was returned lo Ihe county jail in lieu of bond. Ayers was arraigned on charge Thursday. Preliminary learing was sel for Sept. 19 a p.m., bond was reduced 'rom to and he iVas returned to the county jai n lieu of bond. Washington is to receive t learing next Wednesday lo de ermine whether he should be Tied as an adult! He is being icld in the jail under a juvenile court order pending the filing of any charges. Boving reportedly was shot ii Ihe head one time with a .22 cal pistol during a robbery in whicl less than was laken 'froir (Continued from Page 1.) the public tell us if it is willing lo pay the she said. "If it's willing lo pay the price, il iouldn'1 squawk about infla- on." Ilcndrik Houlhakker, Harvard liversily, former Nixon ad- linistration economist: Part of ic answer would be campaign i n a n c e reform, making ongress less susceptible to re- uesls from business such as ic dairy and trucking indus- ies. Me also.proposed making the orporate income tax rate ow a uniform 48 percent ariable, wilh high-profit indus- paying taxes al higher ales. Robert Nathan, Washington onsultanl: "Go after restraints trade and monopolies very, cry he urged. He led Ihc aulo industry, where contrary lo the law ol supply nd demand prices are rapid- rising even though demand is i dodgers and deserters. Oilar llanlds GazHle: Friday, Sept. (i, 1974 Beving's son John, 10. 'Continental Affirms Privacy PHILADELPHIA (AP) will dramatize the prob- cgalcs to the 200th of women by meeting with meeting of the First leaders of some of the most congress Friday reaffirmed groups such as the of America's basic principles Organization for the right of the individual and the Women's Politi- zen to Caucus as well as the Approval by of Women Voters and of the first 18 states came Federation of Business and ing the "reconvening" of women. first congress, the start of also was to confer with bicentennial celebration. President Ford was Rockefeller at the White House, prob- to attend a dinner later to discuss Rockefeller's fu- !o conclude the two-day role in the administration land to map strategy for speedy White House aides said fords hif visit would be strictly al. There had been also called a National that the President might use Council meeting and occasion to unveil his to confer with a pres- program for Vietnam gathering of business leaders reorescnfinE! the Na- ow and supplies ample. He joined Houlhakker in sug- csling "restructuring" the auto idustry breaking il up inlo mailer, competing companies. Carl Madden, U.S. Chamber f Commerce: Institute nation- vide "career education" to pre- are the young for available obs. Reduce government's cost- paperwork demands on bu- y iness. Paul (Continued from Page 1.) editor, and frank Nyc, sociate editor. Top awards in the page one category went to The Clinton Herald and Nevada Evening Journal, and women's page honors went to the Telegraph- Herald and the Cedar Falls Record. Other Eastern Iowa newspa- pers receiving awards include: Dubuque and Ihe Iowa Cily second and third, respectively, in page one for larger newspapers; Vinlon Cedar Valley Times, third in pagp one for smaller newspa- pers. McCrackcn, University f Michigan, former Nixon ad- ninistration adviser: Put pres- ure on banks and savings and oans associations to require hem lo allocate "reasonable mounts" of funds for housing even if they can earn more hrough loans to corporations. Arthur Okum, Brookings Tn- ititulion: Fight inflation by cut- ing taxes which add to the josts of goods in the market place. He cited excise taxes, such as hat imposed on telephone ser- ice, and payroll laxes, such as social security, which is pasfcd ilong lo consumers. Import Bill Senate Democrats pledged meanwhile lo help President ?ord fight inflation, but within lours the senate passed an oil mport bill which opponents claim would niake the problem worse by boosting Ihe price of oil. ie Democrats asked Ford not to wail until next year'to take aclion on the economy and vowed to keep congress in ses- sion through the end of the year if necessary. Meeting privately, they unmii mously approved a resolulioi pledging lo work with Ford this year 'to come up wilh a new economic program lo curb infla lion and give the economy a new boost. But Friday Senate Republican Leader Hugh Scott took a dim 1 of Ihe Democretic propos- al saying il might result only in "breastbcating." "The only reason for slaying in session is Meanwhile Ford scheduled a meeting with Walter Anncn- herg, the American ambas- sador to Great Britain has long wanted to leave his post at the Court of St. James, Anncnberg was persuaded by former President Nixon to stay on for a time. Ford arranged to attend Ihe u n o r a 1 of Gen. Creighlon Abrams in Ihc. memorial chapel at nearby Fort Meyer in the morning. jtional Assn. of Manufacturers land the Chamber of Commerce. Socia rise Tower- (Continued from Page 1.) Ihe lower must be up by Nov. 15, due Ito 'contractual obligations and Ihe risk of ice storms dur- ing the winter. A delay, the counter petition continued, would also set back Broadcasting into northern Iowa by the IEI3N, which is lo have an antenna on the tower. Ask Bond Posting The television company asked that, if an injunction allowing (lie. excavation was issued, Gun- nar Olscn be required lo post a million bond to insure pay- ment of damages. Both parties in the suil agreed Friday to work out details for additional metallurgical lesls on Ihe collapsed lower itself. of this material is because you're afraid to go Scolit said. "We'll have lo plan more Ulan just brcastbeating." Later in the day. the senate approved a bill to require that part of U.S. oil imports be car- ried in American tankers. Senator Cotton chief opponent of the bill, said Ameri- can crews make more money, and other factors would push the cosl of oil higher al a lime of inflation. "If Ihe President signs Ihc bill. I will never listen lo an- olher word from the President aboul all he is going lo do aboul fighting Cotton said. Iowa Hens. Clark and Hughes split their votes on Ihc measure. Clark voted no; Hughes voted 30 YEAKS AGO The department announced plans for partial demobilization of Ihc army after the defeat of Ger- many, and (hers and disclosed overseas housed in a specially-built struc- woukl be flrst. lure at the silc near Walker. civilian life veterans to WEST BRANCH (AP) Ste- 'cn Ford, son of President herald Ford, visited the Her- icrl Hoover National Historic lite here this week. Young Ford was employed by he National Park Service, vhich administers Ihe historic lite, in Washinglon through Ihc summer. He and a companion slopped it the site Wednesday enroute .0 Utah Stale university. They arrived len minutes afler Ihe closing hour. Supt. L. Mintzmyer said Ihey did nql at first identify them- selves or seek any special alien- lion. Bui she said the presence of an accompanying car carrying three Secret Service men pro vided a clue thai a member ol Ihe Presidenl's family was 01 hand, and Steven eventually made his identity known. "When I first offered lo rco pen the buildings, they said no'." Mrs. Mintzmycr said. "But after I had gone inside to get some brochures for them Ihcy said Ihey would like a tour They wound up spending minutes here." Services Board Allocates Day Care Funds The Linn county board of so- cial services voted Friday to allocate of the received under a state law for day care centers to acquire or improve facilities or to acquire recreational or education equip- ment or supplies. Allocations made were to Doll House Nursery, Eden Day Care Center, St. Wenceslaus Day Care Center, and Buttons 'n' Bows Day Care Center, The remained o f the funds is to be allocated in December. Three other centers have expressd in- .eresl in the funds. The allocations are to be based on need for the care in he community served by the center, proportion of low-income amilies served, need for the iquipment or improvement and manner in which the center derives its support. Greek, Turkish Hopeful on Trade Status for Reds MOSCOW (AP) A high- U. S.1 commerce depart- menl official said Thursday that the Ford administration is "somewhat more optimistic" that congress will approve trade concessions for the Soviet Union before it adjourns this year. George Pantos, deputy under- secretary of commerce for leg- islative affairs, speaking at a plastics exhibition here, noted some shifts in congress thai made passage appear more like- New SALT Talks Start in 2 Weeks Leaders Meet! WASHINGTON (APJ The second round of talks between By United Press International Leaders of Ihe Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriol communi- clcar weapons will resume in Nicosia Friday for two weeks, U. S. officials say. .ies met on the truce line thai crosses peace talks hours after rifle and norlar fire rocked the capital Before dawn. C y p r u s President Glafkos derides, head of the Greek Cy- r i o I majority, and Vice- ircsidcnl Rauf Denktash, leader of the Turkish Cypriot minority, net at 4 p.m. (9 a.m. CDT) to discuss a prisoner exchange and problems of Ihc estimated people on the island who have lost their homes or means of livelihood in eight weeks of warfare. It was their firsl meeting since the Geneva peace talks 3rokc down Aug. 14 and the Turkish invasion force on Ihc island launched a two-day the United Stales and the'Soviet Union on limiting strategic nu- Thc talks, known as SALT II. should deal with controls on. the quality of nuclear weapons. They are considered to present a trickier problem than SALT I, which dealt wilh quantities of weapons. ttfditf ana Ruullsricd dolly and Sunday al 500 Third ove. SE, Cedar Raolds. Iowa Second class postage paid at Cedar Rapids. Iowa. Subscription rotes bv carrier 95 cents a. week By moll: Night Edition and Sunday 6' Issues a month, J39.00 o year Af- ternoon Editions and Sunday 7 Issues S3.B5 a month, S40.00 a year. Olher states and US. territories a year. No Mall Subscriptions oc-epled In areas having Goiellc carrier service. The Assoclaled press Is entitled exclusively lo the use for republlcatlon at all the local news printed In this news- paper as well as all AP news dispatches. BROSH CHAPEL Cedar Rapids I" Inquire MMHII Our Prp-arranupd Services Solon Slin'i ipaiMI lo! Know wllli Kawxri PIERSON'S'sMo, NW' rlmu'iTtlione let our fiowers spook for you FLORIST and GIFT SHOP 364-8139 phono answorod 21 hours ovory day 50 CALLS SOLD! LIME onk drop Icnf dlnlno room inhlc nnd t ISO. floakcosr tS, 3 niece drop Icnl brcoMnit irl "Sold within an said Mrs. Robert Adams of 1450 Keith Dr. N.E. To Order Your Action-Ad DIAL 398-8234 8 to 5 Monday thru Saturday Until Noon Saturday Express Your Sorrow With Flowers from Flower 4 Seasons shop 3028 Ml. Vernon Rd. 363-5885 JOHN E. LAPES 308 3rd Avc. SE .163-0511 FALL BIBLE CONFERENCE Calvary Baptist. Church 3rd Ave. 12lhSl. S.W. Cedar Rapids, Iowa phone; 364-5382 f oof uring Dr. Bruce Shelley, Ph.D. FVofciior of Church Hillary Consorvnlivd Bciptiit Theological Sffminory EVnvor, Colorado Conference theme: TODAY" Fridoy, September pin "The Making OF A Disciple" Saturday, September pm "What's So Great Aboul Sunday, September am "The Marks Of A Successful Church" pm "The ,pe Of Heaven and The Age Of Aquarius" no admission charge fiicililies olfcring "The wiirm-hcarlrcl diurrli with I IIP hrart-warmiiit; mpss.ico"   

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