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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 1, 1974 - Page 3

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - September 1, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Daily Record C. R. Weathor High Saliirday II p.m. Saturday Rainfall Total for August Normal for August Normal through August ...23.lt 7 K Noiii 2.9" Total for 1974 Barometer, steady Humidity at It p.m....... 38.71 ..3IMK 86% Wind direction and velocity a Gazette weather slalion at 1 p.m., NW alTm.p.h. Sun rises Monday, sun sets, Year Ago Today High, 90; low, 74; rainfall, none. Births AUK. 30 Mercy To the families ol Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth John- son, IS C avenue, Newhall a daughter; Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Brown, 106 Wast Eighth street, Vinton, .1 Kon; Mr. and Mrs. Konuiu IFelffcrson, 2905 Sev- enth street, Marion, a son 31 Mr. and Mrs. John K. Norman drive NE, a son. Births Luke's Aiiff. HO __ TO the families of Mr. and Mrs. Itichard Midi, 6524 Laurel lane NE, a daugh- ter; Mr. and Mrs. Orin Johnson. Coal Valley, 111., a son; Mr. and Mrs. LaVemc Travis, Shells- burg, a son; Mr. and Mrs. Lylc Sehutta, 5710 Ohio street SW, a son; Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Meyers, 1808 Clundler street SW, a daughter; and Mr. and Mrs. Kulis Kurovilas, 3124 First avenue NE, a son. 31 To the families nt Mr. and Mrs. John N. Gatz, (5812 Inwoocl lane NE, a daugh- ter; Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. lias- ley, 2105 Country Club drive, Marion, a son; Mr. and Mrs. Kofrer G. Smith, 295 Jacolvn (Continued from 1'iigo 1.) driven by Martin Ksquivel win hil by three bullets while travel ing east on Interstate 10. Tht Silooting oeeurred near Ban "IMS, about ill) miles east of Los Angeles. No one was injured on lhat oc I'Hsion but Ihe sniper conlinuec oast on interstate 10 and ap parenlly didn't miss again. The first shooting death oc furred at Indio, about 35 cast of Banning, when ihc sniper got off the highway long enough Io fatally wound Josi Romero, 50, of Pasadena, at the first intersection. Then he re turned to the highway. Here deputies lost track of the time sequence but they sale Billy Gene Tcgarden, 41, o; Belle Gardens, was killed in his pickup truck about 15 miles easi of Indio. Further east, about 15 miles east of Desert City, the sniper fatally wounded Herman Edge, 25, of Long Beach. Used Radio Presley said two truck drivers .vilnossed the shooting of Edge and began trailing the sniper, attempting unsuccessfully at one point to force him off the road. They used a citizen's band radio in the truck to get the license and description of the vehicle to authorities. Deputies at first said Hicks was stopped at a roadblock but aler they said he simply had been pulled over by one of the many law enforcement officers vho were called out to look for he sniper. Among those shot at after the bird death were Harold Sumpler, 51, and his 17-year-old son Mark, of Whittier. The fa- hcr was hit in the cheek by R Campaign Pholo fay L. W. WarfJ Norman Hill, right New York City, associate national director of the A. Philip Ran- dolph institute, was in Cedar Rapids Saturday -for the kiclcoff session of the Cedar Rapids affiliate. He is shown with Juan Cortei, 1022 Eleventh avenuo SE, chairman, and Phyllis Madlock, ,1322 F avenue NW, a vice-president of the local unit. They are in front of the building at Ninth avenue SE that houses the chapter office. Three goals of the group are. voter registration, voter education and an effort to get out the vote on a non- partisan basis. The local unit is one of 145 affiliates of the national institute. Particular em- phasis will bs on black trade unionists. A Black Union counselor's office is located at the same address. Felt Trek Would End in LA. oiiuiii, iyj JaLOJVIli, drive a daughter; and Mr bullet fragment and the son was struck in the eye, seriously inju- ring him, deputies said. After SW, and Mrs. Carl Flcddcrman, 344 Sixth avenue daughter. Fires a.m. Saturday. Over- heated dryer at 2000 Williams boulevard SW. p.m. Saturday. Assis- tance call at 900 0 avenue NW. p.m. Saturday. Unknown to trash at 2025 Otis road SE. Iowa Deaths Brooklyn Joel Williams, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Williams St. Louis Mo. Graveside services Sunday at 2 at IOOF cemetery. Neven- hoven's. Guernsey Frank Dough- erty, 84, of Pomona, Calif. Burial: Monday at 11 at Guern- sey cemetery. Ncvcnhovcn's, Brooklyn. Kalon.i Jeffrey D. Kauff- niiin, 10, of Iowa City. Monday at at Lower Deer Creek Mennonile church. Visitation aflpr nnon Sunday. Powell's. Lisbon Francis James Payton, 65. Tuesday at 2 and visitation at 2 Monday at Mor- gan's. Oxford Edward Miick, 65. Funeral mass Monday at 10 at SI. Mary's. Tiosary Sunday at 8 at Oxford chapel where friends may call after 9 a.m. Sunday. Swisher Frank C. Wis- nicwski, 87, Kankakee, 111., for- merly of Swisher. Services: Tuesday at 2, Brosh in Cedar liapids, with burial in Duponl ccmelery near Swisher. Friends may call at the chapel after 3 Monday. Tama Julia E. 84. Tuesday at 10 at St. Patrick's Catholic Burial: St. Jo- soph's cemetery, Chelsea. Rosn- ry Monday at 8 at Mason- Hands'. Traer John Boclle, 8 Tuesday at at United Presbyterian church. Erick- son's. Vint nn Perry Mont- gomery. 77, former Vinton resi- dent, died in Kemington, Incl. Burial: Monday at 2 at Ever- green cemetery. Campbell's. West Branch John Melvin Thomas, 02. Tuesday at at. St. Bernadette Catholic church. Rosary Monday at at Barker's. Mrs. Cherry, 65, Of Marion Dies Helen Noska Cherry, 65, of 2920 Tenth avenue. Marion, died Saturday morning in a Cedar Rapids hospital. Mrs. Cherry had lived in Marion for five years after moving from the Center Poinl area. Born March 12, 1009, near Palo, she married Edward Nos- ka on Mmx-h 8, He died in She was married to Carl Cherry'on May 1, 1955. He died in 1972. Surviving are one daughter, Dodge; two sons, James Noska, of Cenlral City, and Richard Noska, of Marion; one step- daughter, Mrs. Glenn Black- treatment at a hospital in Blythc, he was taken to an eye specialist in Phoenix. Two other persons were hospi- talized with gun shot wounds and were reported in satisfac- tory condition. Fired Inside The second person fired at during the spree was Beginald Garcia, 21, of Anaheim. He was approaching Indio around a.m., enroute to the Colorado river with his wife, her brother anci the brother's girlfriend, v.'hnn Die sniper pulled up and fired inside. "I heard some type of a pop- pop Garcia told a re- porter later. "We thought it was some kind of a rod: hitting the bottom of the car Then he (the sniper) let go with a big bang. The glass shattered and the impact was so hard that glass hit my wife's side, and she was on the passenger side." Garcia suffered minor cuts on us neck from the glass. His wife was not injured. Stanley, Carey, 21, of Indio, who also was hit by flying glass when ills car window was shot out, said lalcr, "I just feel shook up." He declined to dis- cuss the incident at the request of authorities. (Continued from Page 1.) stop him in Chicago. He was erator who made the unauth- orized phone call to us." come home. He still had most of the ?25 he had left home wilh. more confident that police in A' this point the parents Los Angeles would catch him wcre convinced Jimmy was His father made arrange- when he stepped off the flight headed for Hawaii, during a lay-over., The mother received the first hint that something was .wrong when a friend who works at the school called at 2 p.m. to ask why Jimmy was absent. This was hours be- ments for him to stay at a They called the United secu- motel, but there was a hitch, rity department at the Los ''he motel would not accept a Angeles airport. Jimmy was minor with a credit card. The not found by the men who father finally obtained the .searched for him and boarded room at the motel by making his flight to the islands. Attempts to check the pas- senger list did not show any- arrangements through the mo- tel's chain outlet in Cedar Rapids. The adventure was still not parents were still con- over because all flights back to the mainland lhat day were booked. Still more phone calls chit rt disappears including know anyone in Southern Call- were made by the father and hind the schedule Jimmy fig- u'u ,M1UW on b one using the family's name. The parents were still con- The parents did the usual vinced Jimmy was going to things that parents do when a Hawaii because he did not contacting police. At 8 p.m. the mother discov- ered her charge card missing from her purse. A half-hour later, Jimmy, still in the Los Angeles air- port, tried to call a nation- wide service for runaway chil- dren who want to leave' mes- sages. He wanted to relay word that he was all right. After a trustrating half-hour on the phone, he still wasn't able to get the number. Exasperated, Jimmy called fornia. They called Ihc airport in Honolulu Io alert sccurily. At the same time Jimmy was fly- ing over Ihc ocean, still hop- ing someone would catch him, personnel on Ihe airplane were going out of their way to make his trip pleasant. When the plane landed Jimmy boarded a limousine for the ride downtown. He tried to rent a room in a holcl, but was told that Ihe only room left was a ?75-a- sleep in holcl chairs. a seat was obtained. The mother figures more llian 20 calls were made to Hawaii and California. Jimmy returned Io Cedar Rapids on Wednesday morn- ing. He promptly fell asleep at home. Few questions were asked unlil Thursday morning. At that lime Jimmy decided to talk further with school of- ficals. He checked out the pos- sibility of attending another school, but rejeclcd it. The present school has pro- lo class that caused the problem. Gunman Escapes With from Bank in Minden MINDEN (UPI) A blond haired gunman look an estimat- ed from the Farmers anil Merchants State Hank Sat- urday before forcing three per- sons into two vaults to make a clean getaway. Ronald Maley, FBI .special agent in charge of Nebraska and Iowa, said authorities were searching for a "beat up vehic- le" possibly a Chevrolet Nova, which was seen in this small western Iowa community shortly before the robbery. Malcy said no shots were fired as the bandit forced two male tellers into a regular vault and a customer into a safe de- posit vault. Maley said the bandit entered the bank and said is a holdup." He told one teller to lie on the floor, vaulted the teller counter and then ordered the oilier teller to Ihe floor. The gunman then cleaned out bolh teller cages and took addi- tional money from a vault. All of the money was in cash. As Ihe bandit was leaving, Maley said the customer walked in and was ordered into the vault. the Cedar Rapids police de- nieht suite parlment. A patrolman in Ce- Jimmy wandered around mjsed TTlcrnTe'to "the dar Rapids refused to accept tho hotel area, pausing allcinalivo to the the collect call. Finally, Jimmy told the op- erator lo charge ii to his parents' phone. The operator, sensing some- 2 Persons Jailed On Arms Count INDEPENDENCE A man and a woman who gave their address as Ihc Troy Mills area wcre arresled by Linn county deputies near Walker Saturday morning and charged with firearm violations in Buchanan county. Buchanan county Sheriff Joe Holgale said warrants wcre is- sued for Kenneth Millard and Cindy Johnson aflcr citizens re- ported the Johnson woman poinling a gun at persons in Rowley. They were arresled about a.m. Saturday. Holgale said, and appeared before Buchanan counly Magistrate Don Hocger Saturday morning. Millard was charged wilh car- rying a concealed weapon and Johnson wilh "going armed w i t h according lo Hoogcr. Holgale reported (hat !hc gun Millard is alleged lo have con- cealed was a sawcd-off shotgun. A preliminary hearing was continued until Wednesday, and he Iwo were released on their A full 24 hours aflcr his mother woke him to start the school year, Jimmy caller? !iis thing was wrong, called the II was 2 parcnts at the same lime the Wa" "nd G. a'ln- Tucsday son was talking with the po- lice department. Jimmy told the officer Io Cedar Rapids. Tired and hungry, Jimmy had ruled out renting a room tell he was okay hotel. He wanted to and hung up. The operator was listening lo Jimmy's call at. the same lime she had the parents on another line. Against telephone company rules, Ihe operator told the parents their son was in Los Angeles. Ten minutes later she called back to say that Jimmy had called from a pay phone at the United airlines counter. Later, when Jimmv was home safe and sound, the fa- ther would comment: "The only nice thing that happened in the whole... mess was the telephone op- Ctfclitr HiqmU Want ails will {imi buyers lor items you no longer use! Dial wood of College Place, Wash.; ,wn one brolhiT, Claire Carver, Spring Valley, Calif.; and II grandchildren. Services: Tuesday at a.m. al Ihc Murdoch chapel in Marion by Ihe Kev. John Park Winkler, jr. Burial: Cedar Me- morial park. Friends may call at Ihe chapel afle.r I p.m. Sun- day. Tin1 casket will not be opened afler a.m. Tuesday. II K HiKKeslcd lhat memorial be maddo the cancer fund. i'rnmgtf I'M IK'S I I Mnvidl SHOP 5008 Center Pi. Kel. N.F. .W-.MIM (the G'ozetlr Co. nnfl onrt Sundnv ol 500 Third (we. SE, Crdar Rnplds, lown 5240ft. Second class nostnac paid al Codnr Raiilds, Iowa. Subscription roles bv corrlcr ?s cenls n WCC'K. By moll: Nlotil Edlllon and Sundoy' 6 Issues 13.75 o monlh. o veor: Af- ternoon Editions ond sundav 7 issues 13.85 a monlh, HO.OO a Year. Oilier states nnn1 U.S. territories S60.00 n Year. No Mail e Associated Press Is unfilled KlvHv tfl Ihe uie lor icnuhllrolion ol ic lord news nrlnled In mis n-ws- j r os well us all AP news dispatches, i Anamosa Inmate Gets Married In Reformatory ANAMOSA (AP.) Charles Hartman, a resident of the Iowa Men's reformatory, was married Saturday Io Rita Ad- dison, 20, Cedar Rapids, in Ihe prison chapel. Hartman, charged with break- ing and entering, had filed a suit againsl Ihe prison in Linn county district court earlier this year aflcr he was denied per- mission Io marry. He clainied righls had liis consliliilioiial )cen violated. Harlman, who will be eligible for parole in 12 lo 111 months iroviding he maiiilains good bc- lavior, was given poi mission lo narry earlier this monlh and he subsequently dropped Ihe suit. Prison officials said il was Ihe irst marriage a I. the prison in 'ivc or six years. The prison ad- ninisl nil ion frowns on such narriages, contending il is hcl- !or for inmalcs lo wail un hey are treed, oilicinls said. Jimmy's parents are upset about the money spent on the trip. They plan no special punishment, but (hey say Jimmy will be made to pay for the trip over a period of time. As for the short Hawaiian visit. Jimmy said: "This lime I realized all of the things weren't as pretty as I thought." Why did a boy, who his mother fiays is Ihe lightest w i t h money of all six members of Ihe family run away on an expensive trip. Jimmy says he did it to get action on his school problem. He was tired of wailing. The Irip was planned Io dramatize his plight. .Jimmy's mistake was lie didn't think 'the Irip would succeed. "I kept hoping 1 would gel caught so thai 1 wouldn't (Continued from Page 1.) make up one of the largest groups of employes in Ihe country, Ford said, they "have a special role to play in the fight againsl inflalion because we in. government set the ex- ample." "Earned Re-entry" Concerning amnesty, ter- Hurst said the President con- tinued to i-ulc out any blanket amnesty and preferred the term "earned which in- dicates that draft dodgers and deserters would probably have to perform alternative service. The press secretary and other officials said the following issues were discussed in Satur- day's meeting: The nature of work demanded for returning deserters and draft dodgers. tcrHorst said Ihe President felt there were enough acceptable jobs for al- ternative service in the general economy without the govern- ment creating them. A Pen- tagon document mentioned jobs in "hospitals, schools, ecology and other community and chari- table organizations." The length of service re- quired. Whether, draft, dodgers, and deserters should be required to acknowledge guilt. terHorst spe- cifically refused to stale if this was recommended by the cabi- net officers. Many young men who descried or fled the country io avoid (he draft have contend- ed they will never accept an amnesty program which re- quired such a statement. A proposal by Sen. Taft (R- Ohio) that a brief period of im- munity be pranleri so lhat draft dodgers and deserters can re- turn home and determine if they wish to accept the amnesty' terms. The President had made "no decisions at all except to pro- terHorst said. "He is fir- mly convinced that there is a way, based on precedents con- fronted by former President Truman and former President Linrjjjn lhat there should be aj for those young men Io work Ihcir way back into Amer- ican society and rehabilitate hemselvcs." Cnliii' Ilapids Oair.llr: Sun.. Sriilrnibrr I, 3A Obituaries Robert Shannon Robert (Bob) K. Shannon. 59, IIIO'I Eighth avenue SW died Sat- urday after a brief illness. Born Sept. 15. 1015, in Maron- go, he had lived in Cedar Rapids for !iO years. He was a member of the American Le- gion llanford post and was a veteran of World war II. He was employed as an au- tomobile parts salesman and formerly owned the Shannon supper club in North Liberty. Surviving is one sister, Lucille Schmidt, of East Dubuque. Services are pending al thej Tcahcn funeral liomc. Smith Infant Baby girl Smith, infant daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Smith, 295 Jacolyn drive NW, died at birth Saturday, Surviving in addition to her parents are a brother Chris Stark, a sister, Sonja Smith, at home; grandparents, Sarina Pullman and George Starr, and Mr. and Mrs. William R. Smith, all of Cedar Rapids. Private services were held Saturday at Cedar Memorial cemetery. Arrangements were I handled bv Cedar Memorial. 'Dick: Should Memorial Services n I D J i. Konl, Pearl Emily DalanCG DUdgST SIGOURNEY -Congress at p.m. at Turner chape] west by the Rev. Stephen Root. Burial: Liriwood cemetery. Vis- itation at the funeral hnme should act promptly io balance the federal budget "if we are pm about not be open'ecl'aftor the service. Dick told a fund-raising Groff, Josephine Tuesday Republican rally at Izaak Wal- at 10 a.m. at immaculate Con- ton league park Friday night, ception church by the TSev. njcir nni Calvary cemetery. Friend's Fourth call at the Stewart funeral home Monday from 2 until 9 p.m. Report Prisoner Is Still Missing Linn county sheriff's deputies reported Saturday night that a missing county jail prisoner had not yet been found. A deputy said Russell Wil- liams, of Cedar Rapids, failed to return Io the jail Friday night being on a work release project. Williams had been in custody since Aug. 19 to serve a 30-day sentence for pointing a gun at an individual. didalc for congressman. He ap- peared wilh Stale Rep. Dave Stanley of Muscatine, GOP can- didate for U.S. senator and Har- vey Holden of Washington, a candidate for stale represent- ative. ,An estimated 200 paid for a Barbecue dinner with the profit going to the three candidates. Steen Treated After Motorcycle Accident Wayne A. Stccn, 28, of 5500 Skyline drive NW, was treated and released from St. Luke's hospital Saturday afternoon fol- lowing a motorcycle accident near Ellis park. A hospital spokesman said Steen suffered a laceration on his left leg when he flipped his vehicle. Services Tuesday for Former Swisher Man SWISHER-Frank C. Wis- nic-.vski, Si, a retired farmer, died in Kankakee, 111., Saturday morning after a long illness. Born Oct. 6, 1886, in Poland, ic farmed in the Swisher area before moving to Kankakee 15 years ago Io make hii home with his niece, Rose Bisluk. H e is survived by two brothers, Thomas Wisnousky o[ Swisher and Edwin of Rockford, III. Services: Tuesday at 2 p.m. Brosh chapel in Cedar Rapids with burial in the Dupont ceme- tery near Swisher. Friends may call at the chapel after 3 p.m. Monday. Camp Good Health Always A Giftl Planters Green Foliage 1800 Ellis Blvd. NW y FIOWERPHONE STEWART FUNERAL HOME CENTURY BURIAL VAULTS Since III27 Charles, llt'iiriella, Charles Jr. I'm'lioliradsky MT. VKIINON S.F.. Illi'l We have so many beautiful ways to sny something special FLORIST and GIFT SHOP 364-8139 phono answered 24 hours every day Previously ropnrtnl Vnn Bnrnn alumni re- union 1074 In memory of my fa- ther, Joseph K 1'arr, on my wedding day, T r o in G n i 1 r a r r Baker In memory of Joseph Dlouliy from Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Clark.. 10.00 In loving memory of my husband, William Dohnatak lo.fltl In memory of Mrs. J o h n Edwards, sr., H e n (i e r s o n, N.C'., from Mr. and Mrs. Frank Jiruska 10.00 In memory of (Harold) McAlle from H e n n e s s e y Eros............... 10.00 n memory of Mrs. Anton Frihyl f r o m Mr. and Mrs. C. Norhei'K 10.00 n m e m o r y of our mom, Dor o I h y E. Sernvy, on her birth- day, Sept. 2, from Dndi, Dirk and Tat 10.00 In lovlnir memory of our dear friend, Ray Winslow, from Mr. and Mrs. Ralph ford 10.00 in' memory of Frank from Mr. and Mrs. Marvin J. Ilenselld, sr., and family, At- kins 5.00 In loving memory of my hu.sliand, Peter iUeCraeken, on li 1 s birthday 5.00 In lovins memory of Sarah............. 5.00 111 memory of Nick Sierra from Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lynch 5.00 In memory of my sis- ter, Dorothy E. Ser- ovy. from Carl and Marie Sedlacek 3.00 In memory of Harold "Darh" P I n in m e r from friends....... In memory of Mary Wall from M a h e I Gordon I'otal ..............5 Budget Vcl to lie raised FINK MEMORIALS SINCE 203 14th Ave. SE Phone 364-4439 Markers, Monuments and Private Mausoleums TEAHEN FUNERAL HOME Marian Tcahen MWM K Phone M I-S62V I'.lilen It. Kohn .MIIIUH Win r-'lrsi .Ave. NW' JOHN K. flowers Sinco 1909 downtown 308 Ihirtl Avenue S.I. .165-0511 lohn B. lUrner Son Riiicral Directors since 1888 Only one service...our best to all. Cost is entirely a matter of personal choice. 'Himrr'sKasi KOOSn nncl Avr. SK First Avr.Wrsl Comforting, Warm, Dignified KpelhiR words, words thai families served by the (TDAR 1MI-MORIAI. RJNF.RAI. HOME have used Io clcscrllic candldil services in Iho Old KnRlish Chapel of Memories. jedor llcmoriat FUNERAL HOME Irmrlen. I'lm.iT Mini, 1st AVO. m-mn   

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