Cedar Rapids Gazette, August 27, 1974

Cedar Rapids Gazette

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Publication name: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 27, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Weather- Partly cloudy tonight with lows 48 to 54. Sunny Wednesday with highs in the lower 70s. LO VOLUME ‘>2 - NUMBER 230 nimbi (Dnjf'Ht CITY FINAL 15 CENTS CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1974 LINDBERGH ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES Police Slay Escapee On Crime in Deep Trouble j CHICAGO (AP) — Attorney rn    •■.General    Saxbe    .said Tuesday l^uDT UlP # that crime in ti** U.S. rose 6 VU||| III V Ma percent in 1973 and called the cwDWMtm tem    upward trend “harsh, bitter and STE PHENVILLE, Tex a s dismaying.” Iu IL    do8s harked. We, The nation, he said, “is    in threw the light at them and we deep trouble in its effort to; jmw the silhouettes. We hollcrGdlrcducc crime y> for them to stop. They did not Saxbe’s remarks were in a and then .started lunning and speech prepared for a confer-we started firing. ’    cncc 0f big-city police chiefs. That's how Jim Edmore, a “We can now perceive with ■ Mineral Wells policeman, de-!shocking clarity that we have; scribed the cornering Monday suffered a severe setback” in night of three escaped convicts the fight to curb crime, he said. who had terrorized the ranch He noted that the FBI Uni country of central and west form Crime Reports showed Texas for four days. One of the three convicts, Richard Mangum, 22, was killed in the gunfire as law enforcement officers moved in to end the bloody rampage that had that the number of crimes reported to police declined 4 percent in 1972, the first drop in 17 years. 16 Percent More According to the FBI figures. left two dead and five wounded the rate held steady for the first  w___ nine months of 1973. then soared (Photos on Picture Page) and had chased frightened residents from their homes. Jerry Ulmer, 22, a convicted murderer, and Dalton Williams, 29. the third escapee, were arrested. Police said the convicts did not return the hail of gunfire. Sprained Ankle Mangum was shot in the face, arms and body, police said. They said Ulmer sprained his in the last quarter to 16 percent more than in the comparable period of 1972. The figures showed a 15 percent increase for the first three months of 1974. The statistics reflect the number of crimes reported to state and local police in seven categories — murder, rape, assault, robbery, burglary, larceny and motor vehicle theft. The full-year report for 1973 is due for release Sept. 6. Saxbe Eulogy: Death Is "New Adventure lf HANA, Hawaii (AP) —[York to Paris. Others before Charles A. Lindbergh, who him had flown across the Atlan-sparked worldwide excitement tic, though never alone, with his “Lone Eagle” flight i With the backing of a St. from New York to Paris in 1927, | Louis group, Lindbergh super-has been buried in a small,!vised construction of a Ryan seaside graveyard less than airplane, and in the misty, driz-eight hours after his death. izlin« dawn ot MaV 20' l927’ bc The only family members took off from Long Island’s, Roo sevelt field in “The Spirit of St present on Monday when the 72-' Louis”. year-old aviation hero -UPI Telephoto The Lone Eagle of 1927 Ford: Lindy Was AP Wirephoto By Associated Press    {praised    Lindbergh    as    “one of President Ford says Charles America's all-time heroes” jndbergh “represented all that!whose place in history was as- “I10"- sured after his solo flight. will to    b “In later years, his life was Lind- darkened by tragedy and col- was best in our country esty, courage and the greatness.” In scores of tributes. ankle as officers arrested the said it “will show that crime ac-pair. An ambulance driver said dually increased during 1973 by! Monday at the age of 72 marked I life, Gen. Lindbergh always bergh was hailed as a hero and 0red by political controversy, citizen of the world whose death Hut in both public and private the end of an era in aviation. Financier Howard Hughes, an early aviation figure, in a telegram to Mrs. Lindbergh called Lindbergh “a pioneer in that Ulmer was taken to the,6 percent, not the 5 percent that Stephenville police station, was earlier predicted.” where he joined Williams.    “The fact is that for at least a The three escaped from the I brief period we have lost    our Colorado State prison at Canon I initiative and are back on    the City last Thursday. They head-1defensive,” he told the chiefs. cd at once across New Mexico' He expressed disappointment and into Texas to seek revenge I in the performance of a justice against persons who had tes-(department agency, the Law tified to send them to prison. Enforcement    Assistance    Ad- Those killed in Texas had te3- ministration, tified against two of the convicts    Only    Recently at separate trials. Officers said    Noting that it has spent $3.2 the convicts had mentioned the! billion on crime-fighting provictims to other inmates as ob-!8rams over th* last Slx years* jects of revenge before escaping ho saidJ1 only recently set up a    ( from Canon City    comprehensive way of measur-1 nopejo ail or us ^ Rotating Hie effectiveness of its remained a brave, sincere patriot . . . The courage and daring of his feat will never be forgotten,” said Ford. # Senator Humphrey (D-Minn.) the conquest of thc impossible.” :'suggestcd lhat thc NationaJ Air “Courage”    and    Space    museum now under “May the knowledge of his contributions sustain and comfort you.” Hughes said. “The courage and example of your lives, together with the accomplishment and vision which marked his career, have been a source of encouragement and of his life for aviation and the!people who didn’t work and peo-envircnment.    |    pie who didn’t think,” recalled Lindbergh “epitomized the Hobbs. “He was no genius like glamour of a decade” when he ! Einstein but he was a shrewd inmade his flight, said Harry dividual with a real basic abil-Grey, a contemporary who be-1 tty. He never lost control and came chairman and president of never spoke out of turn.’’ United Aircraft Corp. “But he was the antithesis of that glamour.” said Grey. “To his scientific mind there was nothing foolhardy about the flight. It was not a search for adventure or thrill, but a proof of the future of aviation.” was buried beside the nondenomina-t i o n a I Kipahulu Hawaiian church were his widow, Anne, and one of the five Lindbergh children, Land. The other four living children of the man who flew out of obscurity with an epic solo crossing of the Atlantic in a single-en-gined plane were too far away to fly to Hawaii in time for the service. The eulogy r- part of which Lindbergh had written himself — was delivered by a young Protestant minister, the Rev. John Tincher. Lindbergh penned these words: “Final Rest” “We commit the body of General Charles A. Lindbergh to its final resting place, but his spirit we commend to Almighty God, knowing that death is but a new adventure in existence and re ;*t, t ■ JU u • i numbering how Jesus said upon was active with _ Undbtrgh mjthc Cross* ..Father> int0 jhy hands I commend my spirit.” At his own request, Lindbergh was buried in a khaki shirt and dark cotton trousers. Charles A. Lindbergh in 1973 America s Best “Greatest” Lauranee Rockefeller, who conservation projects, said he felt Lindbergh’s work in that field “was probably the greatest of his many achievements.” “The loss of Charles Lind- At 122 rn.p h., the young pilot faced 3,610 miles of treacherous ocean passage. To sustain him, he carried a canteen of water and five sandwiches in a brown paper bag. At Le Bourget airport in Paris, 25,000 wildly enthusiastic Frenchmen mobbed Lindbergh’s (Photos on Picture Page) The victims were ------ rancher T. L. Baker, 65, who. sP^n(-ing-had testified against Williams in a robbery case, and Mrs. Ray CXt, a resident of a community near here, who had testified against Ulmer. They were shot Saturday at their homes. Other Charges Saxbe remarked that LEAA soon will get its fifth administrator in six years and said: “Such turnover hardly enhances efficiency.” He said poverty, diminishing (influence of such institutions as John Glenn, the first American astronaut to orbit the earth, said Lindbergh’s life “exemplified the great American pioneering spirit and has set this nation apart.” He said Lindbergh’s completion of the first solo transatlantic flight in 1927 was “the catalyst that set in motion the massive system of intercom the church and the family, and Erath county Dish Atty. Bob h i g h unemployment among Glasgow said) Ulmer and Wil- urban young people of racial tinental air travel we accept as hams would be charged with minorities contribute to crime. commonplace today” bergh leaves America and the construction in Washington be Leonard Hobbs* 77* a former, world bereft of one of the most named in Lindbergh’s honor.    ™';chair.man,    of    Ln''^ Alr'    I dedicated and    eloquent spokes- .    .    „    craft, said he developed the car-men of mans    concern for the Epitomized Glamour    buretor used    in    Lindbergh’s    preservation of    his natural encl t    he r s remembered Lind- plane and knew-    the    aviator on a    vironment. He    will be sorely bergh as a publicity-shy hero business basis.    missed,”    said    Rockefeller. who worked until the last days “He was very impatient with ....    . ,    „ * 1     ____________________Radio    commentator    Lowell Thomas, a longtime friend, rated Lindbergh “one of the three real heroes of our time — the others being Copt. Eddie Riekenbacker and Sees Air Bags Saving 15,600 Lives Per Year His casket of eucalyptus wood was built by cowboys from nearby ranches. “The Lone Eagle planned his final trip as much as he planned his Atlantic trip or anything eke he ever did in his life,” said Dr. Milton Howell, a longtime friend. Howell said Lindberg died of I cancer of the lymphatic system. I The pioneer aviator had spent ■the last eight days of his life in | Hawaii after a month-long stay in New York’s Columbia-Pres- WASHINGTON (UPI) - The controversial air bag safety system combined with lap belts could save 15.600 lives a year and cut the injury toll by one million, the government said Tuesday. Dr. James Gregory, head of other charges would later. mi.rrfprim* Mrs Oft Hp said “One lesson is that we are not I Donald Douglas, founder ofTbe National Highway Iraffic murdering mrs. un. it u    ^    ^    ^ crime prob_    Aircraft,    now McDon-iSafety Administration, said thc _ ; lem among the young,    especial- j ncll Douglas, said Lindbergh’s, question facing the automobile|^ qqq a    year Tu/n oirk thpv kidnaped in *y in the cit‘es, until    they are (historic    Atlantic flight “was|owner is whether he is willing New Mexico were    raped and brought into society    * main-perhaps    the greatest single, to ttoLands of    IsYstem    would    save    more    than released in Texas.    be    fd K . t , f.cnt ,n fosU™« ^}lc T    limdur,ng    the    47«    lives    and    cut    the    injury I TTh ^convicts’ rustle ^^eVucataaf and employ0 dajs "    "    '    "    '    The    air    ba*.ap    belt    system    rate    by    more than 2 million cars and fired indiscriminately j™nt skills - and couple    it    with    In Paris, one radio station at groups of people while bg ■£- chased up    and down    fa™ js a|s0 ,he deccnt, lhc    humani.    r)icudonne Cosies gave his reac- roa(,s-    tarian thing to do.”    Bon to Lindbergh’s 33-hour Authorities    mounted a    mas-,    -----flight from New York to Paris. sive manhunt in the rugged    u™. ranchland for the three, but the ■Ord NOWS w6SSI0n    “\ery Curious convicts eluded the nearly 200 Ai 1:30 Wednesday “He was very timid, a little pursuing officers for two days. | WASHINGTON (UPI) — Prefe-jdazed looking, a little surprised I steering column or under the in-1 holt system, Gregory said Monday morning, a pol iceman jdent Fords news conference when he stepped out of the strument panel. At the moment But the American Automobile spotted them through binoculars Wednesday will bt* at 1:30 p.rn..'plane.” recalled C’ostes. “It was of impact, thc device automate Assn., attacked tin* air bag say-as they walked along a creek. jowa (jme it will be carried!a very curious impression he cady inflates, the driver’s for-jing its study showed that “in no Edmore said he    and three j jjve on national television and gave.”    ward motion is absorbed in the case do    the benefits    of    air    bags Iii his    tribute, President Ford balloon like device Jimmy Doolittle.” James Stewart, the Hollywood byterian hospital. In a study comparing the two actor who portrayed Lindbergh! safety devices, the agency said in a ^57 movie “The Spirit of St. j    aca 00 ome if (he air bag-Iap belt system f^Uh“"’nlpr^S^him a.S ,h® T ‘'WhcD‘" knew he could not were mode mandatory for 1977 wh“ !!"roduced avla"on ,0 thc ilSTJ' model cars it could save "an es-lB?U" ,    ..    ,. .. Unrated 85.000 lives and reduce; Sle*aJ said Undbe[6b was vehicle injuries bv more than °"e‘>f‘he Pcrsons most "spofr J    'sible    for    gaining    respectability 5.4 million over a nine-year span.’ death cd that he be taken here from Columbia so he could die. He had made his vacation home here for many years and want- The annual highway plane as it landed. But characteristically, he felt it necessary to introduce himself. “I’m Charles Lindbergh,” he told the first to reach him. Showered with medals and honors, “Lucky Lindy” came home to adulation. To promote aviation, he toured 75 cities in what turned out to be one long triumphal parade. Met Anne Later, as a goodwill ambassador to Latin America, Lindbergh met Anne Spencer Morrow, daughter of U.S. ambassador to Mexico, Dwight Morrow. They were married on May 27, 1929. Seeking a measure of solitude, the Lindberghs took asylum in a home built in a secluded section of New Jersey near the village of Hopewell. It was here that tragedy sought out the couple. On March I, 1932, their firstborn, 19-month-old Charles, jr., was kidnaped from his second floor crib. A nation that had cheered Lindy’s triumph five short years before, now found itself caught up in his grief. Lindbergh paid a $50,000 ran-(Continued: Page 3, Col. 6.) Soviet Puts 2 Men in Orbit MOSCOW (AP) - Two more Soviet cosmonauts were orbiting the earth Tuesday, apparently in preparation for boarding the Salyut 3 space laboratory sent toll is now running atl^at av‘att°n c0uld Be used for; In addition to his widow and:up two months ago 6 'the benefit of the tmlar By comparison, the interlock ail MU^-IUU MVI* OJOIVUI lit.    .    ... would add $210 to the cost of ^hen lhc on,lre automobile pop-thc ear. The interlock system :«■«*'«> »’»? equipped with air — which requires a driver to ^ ;ind belts, the death toll connect his seat belt before u01 even out lo a saving of Lie ear eau be started and is I "19-600 llvc,s a"nua«y and a mandatory o„ new ears - reduction of the injury toll by costs an extra Slot), the one million,” the report said. agency said.    “This    study    clearly    shows    the The air bag is installed in the j superiority” of the air-bag lap mode of transportation. world as a Land, Lindbergh is survived by City To Review Valuation for Tass, Soviet news agency, announced that Lt. Col. Gennady Sarafanov. 32, and his flight other officers w-ere in a car j ra(jj0 when they heard dogs barking from a house beside the road. “It sounded like the dogs might be chasing someone,” he said. The officer said a spotlight was directed at the house. Three Figures “That’s when we saw three figures near the side of the house,” he said. Officer Richard Trail of Eastland said, “One of the officers i justify the cost.” Nixon Query: "Pick the Carcass? sons Jon of Washington state and Scott of Paris and daughters Reeve of New England and' engineer, Col. Lev Demin, a 48 i Anne Lindbergh Feydi of Paris. J year-old grandfather, were Memorial services were sched-; launched in Soyuz 15 Monday. Hied at 2 p.m. (7 p.m. COT) at | Tass said the mission was » n    (the Kipahulu church, nestled in proceeding as planned. There P    >a Srove of trees ll miles south was no indication when thc ship ■ hi gtivouo fj.m?    would    link    up    with Salyut 3. But Cedar Rapids N,w,—    i ]t took Lmdbcrgh 334 hourslit was expected Mon since the lo wing his way to aviation im- 'irst announcement said the Soyuz was launched into the same orbit as the space lab. ..    .    „    ,.1    It    was    the    second manned The slim, shy. 25-year-old Sovlet spare night in lcss than former barnstormer and pioneer air mail pilot found instant fame and fortune. But awaiting him also was great personal MEMPHIS (AP) - Rep. Dan Kuykendall (R-Tenn.) says he had a “sad” telephone call Monday from Richard Nixon. “He asked me one pointed question. “Do you think the [Hoople are going to want to threw his spotlight on the sus-j - k (he carcass?" Kuyken-pects, and the suspects were ad-| ^ saifl vised to halt. Instead they broke and ran, and we started shooting.”    ..... Trail was with officers Ell-more, Freddie McDonald and (Continued: Page 3, Col. 7.) Tori ut/’* Chuckle An expert is a man who makes his mistakes quietly. Copvrioht The congressman said he told the former President that he could not detect indications of a punitive mood in the nation. “I told him: ‘Let me speak from thc jxnnt of view of congress. My friends—even oil the liberal side of the Democratic party—don’t seem to want any part of this revenge thing.’ ” Kuykendall had been a strong Nixon supporter through the Watergate scandal and was among the few friends and officials who met with him on the evening of Aug. 8 just before he went on television to announce he would resign Kuykendall said at that time that Nixon “cried like a baby” before leaving tin* room to make the resignation announcement. He said he believes Nixon, who has been maintaining public silence since the resignation, also called some other friends Monday but the former President did not mention any names. “He sounded strong, hut sad, of course,” Kuykendall said. “The conversation, the whole thing is sad. It was a terrible realization for me after we stopped talking that this man a few weeks ago was the most powerful man in the world. It is tragic in the Grecian sense and this episode will also be written about for years to come.” Kuykendall, who is s{lending a week at his family ranch at Cherokee. Texas, said Nixon reached him there alter first trying his Washington office. “My reaction to the call is one of wonder, in a way,” Kuykendall said. “I just wanted to call and tell you I appreciate men like Dan Kuykendall who stood up when the going was tough,” he quoted Nixon as saying as a way of opening the five- minute call from San Clemente. Calif. A special review of Cedar Rapids residences to determine changes in valuation for tax purposes will begin sometime this fall. City Assessor Dale Piersall said he planned to inform the city conference board of details on the residential property review at a meeting Tuesday afternoon. Piersall said the big increase in the market price of some homes in the city has made valuations put on the books just two years ago antiquated. It will mean, of course, that Kuykendall said he asked homes which have appreciated Nixon in a very personal man nor how he was getting along. “lit* said, ‘We’ve got problems with that fellow . . . uh . . ’ “Jaworski? I said. He said, ‘Yes’ ” Kuykendall said Nixon added: “We’re going to lie all 'considerably since the last pro-! fessional evaluation will be boosted in valuation resulting in higher taxes. Similarly, those homes which have decreased in valuation will require less taxes from owners. Pier all said the new valua- mortality in “the Spirit of St. | Louis. two months, and Tass said the mission was “to continue scientific research and experiments in space started on July 3 during tiagedy and dark political de-!^ fjjg^ 0f transport ship nunciation and innuendo.    Soyuz 14 and the station Salyut Charles Augustus Lindbergh 13.” was horn in Detroit, Mich., Feb. 4, 1902. Ile grew up in Little Falls, Minn., where his father was a five-term congressman. Young Lindbergh took mechanical engineering at the University of Wisconsin. But he left in less than two years to enroll in a Lincoln, Neb., flying school. His future was already committed to the skies. In those early days of aviation, Lindbergh served an ap- The two cosmonauts who went up in Soyuz 14 spent two weeks aboard the laboratory testing new equipment to be used in the joint Soviet-American space mission next year. They returned to the earth July 19. Bons won’t be put on the tax right. If there’s any help you    ;rulLs unt|l 19™, adding that any    £r^U.ceship    “    a    win8wal^r, fellows need from me, just let    |effect un tax bllls won t be no-    barnstormer    and    a    member of    a lne know ”    I ‘iced until 1977 at the earliest. sma11 batld of hardy aviation pi ne said he told Nixon that said tbe undertaking could oneers ^ tu> risked their Ii vet; to he believes that at a future    not be called a revaluation realtime “vou will be able to be    i^v* or a reappraisal, but rather a lot of help to the country    termed it a review. He antici- with your knowledge and ex-    Pated only single-family, du- pertise.”    plexes and three-family units "I thank you for that,” | wi" be reviewed. ‘‘We will need Kuykendall quoted him. (Continued: Page 3, Col. 4.) fly the mail. He bought his first pl,inc for $500. First Flight Lindbergh was lured into his great adventure by a $25,000 Or-tcig prize for the first transatlantic nonstop flight from New Todays Index Comics .......... .......... 16 Crossword ____ .......... 16 Daily Record ........... 3 Deaths ......... ...........3 Editorial Features 6 Farm ........... .......... 12 Financial ....... .......... 17 Marion .......... .......-..,,7 Movies .......... .......... ll Society .......... ....... 8,9 Sports ........... ....... 13-15 State 4.5 Television ....... ...... IO Want Ads........ ....... 19-23 ;