Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Cedar Rapids Gazette: Monday, August 26, 1974 - Page 24

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 26, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Rapids Gazelle: Mon., Aug. 26. 1974 fawn V AP wlreotiolu A West German farmer stands next to poster protesting the loss of 20 German marks about for each pig sold. The farmers gathered at Bocholt and four other German-Dutch border crossings last week, where they used some 500 tractors to snarl border traffic for two hours. The protest was aimed against alleged inequities in Common Market agricultural policies. Farm girls dis- tributed yogurt to motorists inconvenienced by the farmers' demonstration, which ended with vio- lence, according to police. European Farmers Upset By Paul Trenlhardt PARIS (AP) French and German farmers dump tons of liquid manure outside govern- ment offices. Thousands of Belgian farm- ers block main roads around Brussels with their tractors. French pig farmers prevent a ship from unloading tons of Chinese pork. Dutch farmers isolate two harbor towns, blocking all freight movements. Italian wine growers protest against "Mafia Moonshine" and say much of Rome's vino lacks veritas. Europe's millions of small farmers, often cultivating only a few acres, are taking to the roads demanding that their governments and the Common Market take radical action. Cosl Boost Gross overproduction has pushed the prices paid the farmers for their beef, pork, wine, fruits and vegetables down while the cost of fuel, fertilizer, feed and credit have shot up 15 to 30 percent. Retail prices do not reflect ernments have taken only limited steps to give them direct aid and meanwhile have done little or nothing to control the booming profits they claim the middlemen are amassing. The Common Market's Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is supposed to harmo- nize farm prices and condi- tions throughout the nine member nations. But it is largely ignored by various governments that adopt poli- cies to meet their own prob- lems. West German Agricultural Minister Josef Ertl warned last week the CAP was in danger of disintegrating completely. "At the moment, European agricultural policy annoys producers, consumers and taxpayers he said. Ertl blamed the crisis on exchange rate fluctuations which mean invoking com- plicated border taxes. Protest Drop However, Bavarian farmers thought their govern- ment was to blame and marched on Munich to protest They accused Bonn of doing nothing while other Common Market countries subsidized their farmers and Italy raised import barriers against Ger- man produce. Italian farmers are not happy either. They have gathered in the thousands to close roads and rail lines from Switzerland and Austria in an effort to bar imports of milk, cheese and other produce from those nations and Germany. They fought German truckdrivers trying to break through the blockades, emp- tied milk from tankers down the drains and dumped chees- es on the roads. Trains bring- ing in sugar were another target. "Smile Campaign" French farmers have al- ternated violence with a "smile campaign." They have overturned truckloads of imported fruit and vegetables at border points, sprayed meat with fuel oil and picketed ships carry- ing foreign meat. But they have also greeted tne arop. in farm income. The against a 10 percent drop in farmers charge that the gov- farm SrnKipQ Valuable WTVwl Cases Reported Listed on Feed (AP) The agriculture department says AMES Iowa law Holden said most feed cases of cattle scabies in- requires the labeling of all piements marketed in Iowa head were re- commercial feeds, pork an excellent job of in the year ended last producers should be aware of the protein, vitamin, or 30. what's on the label. eral requirements of the was down from 53 cas- Palmer Holden, extension wnen fed at the or outbreaks involving sin- swine specialist at Iowa State rate. Occasionally, he said, university, said bulk feeds premixes may provide inad-should be accompanied by a equate levels of one or herds or premises in 1972-74, the department said last week. The 1972-73 cases and label or feed tag. Feeds con- nutrients, and therefore, it affected cat- taining drugs must include a a go0d practice to check The peak in recent years label of "medicated" on the He said up-to-date nutrient requirements are in 1972 when 91 eases of scabies affecting cattle The commonly labeled feeds rrnm feed suppliers, reported. are complete feeds, complete publications such as the various times during the supplements, vitamin premix- tjonai Research of the scabies out- es, mineral or trace mineral "Nutrient Requirements for premixes, and medicated Swine" or extension dozens of counties, mostly in the Southwest, were premixes, said Holden. tjons available from state federal and state quar- A feed tag for the complete county extension to control the disease. supplement contains is caused by tiny mites percent of protein, burrow into the skins of phosphorus and salt as well levels of essential vitamins currently under trace minerals. The back of the tag Newi, Sports, Bookkeeping, General Information and Offices Not Listed quarantine for scabies include Otoe and Saline lists the pounds-'-of corn to Neb., and Bailey and mixed with the supplement Oept 398-8333 Mon. thru Sat. 6 a.m. to 1 counties, Texas. provide different protein Until 12 takes for various age pigs. Feeding less than the 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wont Ads CRAVEN mended supplement thru Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday until 12 PRACTICE IIMITED TO result in an inadequate Advertising WORK Over the long haul, to 5 3 lit Ave. SE. Cedor Rapids, la shortages may become Maine! Maion C.ly Sioux City We put you first! OUR SERVICE DEPT. IS OPEN PM DAILY and on THURSDAY 'til 9 someone species! AT RAPIDS CHEVROLET whether you want a new or used car a new or used truck a motor home for seeing the good ol' USA or the kind of great service you like! Check our Classified Auto Ads tourists with free cuts of prime beef, trays of fruit and vegetables and buttles of wine, along with pamphlets explain- ing their problems. The Common Market or- dered an 8.5 percent increase in farm prices for 1974, but farm groups were pressing for 12.5 percent. The governments of France, Belgium and Italy defied Common Market rules to grant direct aid, price support hikes and tax and credit re- lief. Farm leaders said these were inadequate. Debate Hike The Dutch parliament de- bates the situation next week. Dutch farm unions are de- manding that the prices paid them be raised to four percent over the Common Market level. This year, as never before, farmers are finding the soli- darity to demand what in- dustrial workers have achieved through union action. However, there is no sign of an easy solution to bring peace back to the countryside. With inflation still raging in two figures across the conti- nent, governments face a di- lemma of epic proportions. Retail food prices are a major factor in the rising cost of liv- ing. Higher prices for the farm- ers will fuel inflation still fur- ther. If governments clamp down on retail prices, they fuel protests from all those in the distribution chain. Ciark Proposes Carrying Over Soil Money WASHINGTON (API 'Legislation to permit as much as million in unused soil conservation funds to be car- ried over and added to funds available in 1975 was intro- duced by Sen. Dick Clark (D- lowa) last week. "Bad weather and bureau- cratic delays" have made it impossible for many farmers to utilise this year's funds, Clark said. He estimated as much as half the million being offered for cost sharing during the 1974 calendar year through the Rural Environmental As- sistance Program (REAP) and Rural Environmental Con- servation Program (RECP) will have to be returned to the federal treasury Dec. 31 un- less a carry-over is allowed. A carry-over would also permit the administration to release an additional mil- lion in 1974 REAP-RECP funds which were impounded by President Nixon, said Clark. Clark said he understands the USDA's primary reason for not releasing these funds now is that there is no way they could be spent before the year ends. "With high food prices a major concern and with re- duced crop yields threatening to drive these prices even higher, it would be foolhardy to let any of this badly-needed money he said. Clark said the nation needs to do everything possible to increase farm output. "Soil conservation measures can play fin essential role in this effort by preserving and in- creasing the productivity of the he said. Clark said the heavy rains in the Midwest this spring washed away vast quantities of topsoil, "diminishing the productive capacity of much of our best farmland for years to come." He estimated that 20 per- cent of the state's corn and soybean acreage lost at least 10 tons of topsoil per acre and said losses of 40 to 50 tons were not uncommon. A chief reason for the lack of soil conservation projects undertaken this year was the government's failure to get its programs underway on time, Clark said. Things are happening every day in the classified ads. ON YOL1B CAB AMOUNTS ]q_itp 01_OB ItSS- YOU PAY ABSOLUTUY NOTHING! BODY FENDER REPAIR WITH EVERY JOB! STILL AMERICA'S BIGGEST BARGAIN CEDAR RAPIDS DAVENPORT DCS MOINES 1000 2ND AVE. S.E. 810 WEST RIVER OR. 1110 LOCUST ST. 366-7144 334-0631 288-6116 Farmers Reminded To Dispose Of Dead Animals in 24 Hours AMKS With fewer ren- ileriiif! plants in Iowa, live stock owners have a moral and legal obligation to dispose of (heir dead animals, particu- larly in warm weather when rapid decomposition occurs. Dr. John llerrick, extension veterinarian at Iowa State uni- versity, said last week state law requires dead animals to be disposed of within 24 hmirs by burial, burning, or ship- to a rendering plant. Rendering Service He noted that rendering plants are charging for their services, something unheard of several years ago. Farmers using rendering service should call early and only for large animals, the veterinari- an noted. The animal should be moved to an area near the road, but not by dragging through areas used by other animals. The area where the animal died should be disin- fected. The veterinarian pointed to dead animals as a source of disease both animal and hu- man. Some diseases that can be transmitted to humans include leptospirosis. sal- monellosis, and brucellosis. Derrick pointed to impro- perly disposed carcasses in recent pspudnrabies cases. Young pig tan-asses were carried away by dugs, cats and wildlife. These animals are suspected of being re- servoirs of the infection. In one outbreak, cats, dogs anil raccoons showed evidence of being exposed to the virus causing psetidorabies. Cheap Cost Tile cost of using a render- ing service is comparatively cheap and is still the best means of disposal, llerrick contended. A livestockinan can reduce rendering service cost by assisting in salvage operations. In the absence of a render- service, burying is an aiirplaWi- disposal Dead animals should be bur- ied at least -4 feet deep and covered with quicklime. The plot should be isolated from surface waters and should be made (inaccessible to scavag- iug animals. In warm weather, death from heat exhaustion and lightning are common. Con- sequently, llerrick recom- mends daily inspections of animals. Most insurance com- panies require suspected lightning cases In be con- firmed by a veterinarian within a few hours after death. llerrick advised livestock- men to burn or bury small animals and save the render- ing truck a call. _UPI Wirepholo Butz Inspects New Beans United States Agriculture Secretary Earl Butz (right) takes time out from a campaign tour in Charleston, III., to inspect a new double cropping tech- nique for beans. Farmer Cleo Duzan (left) shows Butz his crop planted from an airplane after the first crop fell to the elements of bad weather. DON'T MISS IT, August 1974 wiii definitely not be held over Store-wide Clearance' for New Fall Arrivals on Famous Quality General and jHFrigidaire Appliances! Shop Monday and Thursday nights til 9 and all day Saturday. 106 Second Ave. SW Phone 363-0283 West End of the Second Avenue Bridge   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication