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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 21, 1974 - Page 5

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 21, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Odar Rapids Gazetfc: Wed. Aug. 21. 1974 Coe Graduafes 44; Second Nurse Class Forty-four seniors, mcluiling Williams. Westfield, philoso- Ihc second rlass In awarded phy the bachelor of science in Pennsylvania nursing degree, were tcradual- Anne Patterson, Philade! I'd Friday in formal phia. mathematics. Trail To Be Dedicated v- rrrt'iiionii's at I'm' college 11 was the college's sixth annual August commencement Klght graduates received specut! honors, KathlriMi Ann Thompson. Wil- ton, Conn., who was graduated magna cum laudf (with great j honor) in inimiiincs. The seven who received (inn j Uiiidi' (with honor) distinction were: Itose.M. Baleja. Chicago: I Lesley Margaret Pisca- tawav X .1 Barhara Ann j Dnliiii. Rutherford. N. Amy I .lohnson. St. Paul, Martha Chambers Melton. Hulherfnril. N. .1.. Alfred Olh- mar Itiiegg. Rudolfstetten, j and Mary Kiiye Smith, Odar Hapids. j Cue President I.eo I. Nuss- baum was the commeneemenl speaker. ConniTtk'Ut Alfred Kucgg. IfudolMeltcn history Till1 H WHWn 'A ho received their nursing decrees are: Martha C Mellon. Atlanta Illinois HUM- Marie Haleja, hicagn; Dehnrah Kngel. Chicago: Sharon Flyiin. 'hirago. Mar June l.lpmski, Oak Lawn I'i'va Sharon Kaschmitlcr. '.ilill Al- ma drive NW. Cedar Kapids; Kathleen Beadle, Dubuiiiie, Shirley Twenty- fifth avenue. Marion; JoAnn I'lidil. Solon. Minnesota Barhara Kleglc. St. Paul. New Jersey Kathleen Chamhers. Mill- Indian Creek Nature Center's first official foot trail will he dedicated on the Nature Center site Sunday. Openim' of Discovery trail" will allow center member-, and the general public to enjoy hiking and learning in the out-of- doors "Discovery trail departs Ir-un fhe vif-i uid ing interpretive trail because the layman can get more in- volved with the natural world than lust reading about it." said Center Director Curtis D Abdouch 'Instead of inst assigned stops along the route which could be discussed in a jinali'd guidebook, the booklet has designed mini-activities which can be jierfi.rmeil by hikers. therefore making the a more meaningful experience Some ol the H stops, then, are leaching stations The loop trail originates near the law barn, meanders through woods and openings. then drops the fl.....I plain where the confluence of Indian creek and the Cedar river can he viewed The trail then bark 'ho east bank of Indian creek and ter- minates at the barn Both na- tural features and man-made changes on the landscape will be interpreted. The trail's opening will occur in two phases from :i in for members only and from ;i p m for the general public There will he no chaw for Sunday's event However, non- nieiiihi'rs will be expected (o pay a oil-cent use fee for adults and a 2a-eenl use fee lor children under 12 years of age for trail hiking thereafter The trail will he open to members free of chaw The trail may tie used by visitors during regular weekend hours of operation soon to be announced Dis- covery 'rail will li" open tn in- dividuals, families and groups Suggested parking for the trail dedication may he either along Otis or Bertram roads in extreme southeast Cedar Kapids nr the Sac and Fnx trail lot. Visitors who park at the Sac and parking lot will be expected to hike the short distance to the Nature Center site at the corner of Otis and Bertram roads Jean Danskin, left of 432 West Post road NW, was the top clinician in the new respiratory therapy program this year at Kirkwood Community col- lege, and Sally Lamb, 3111 Sixth street SW, was the top academician in the class. They were among recipients of awards at a recognition night program Monday night for their class the first to complete training at Kirkwood. Much of the class' training was taken in Mercy and St. Luke's hospitals in Cedar Rapids and University and VA hospitals in Iowa City. Kirkwood Graduation Set The first products of four 'new vocational-technical programs at Kirkwood Com- munity college will be included in the summer graduating class. Summer commencement will be Saturday at a.m. in Memorial coliseum. Iowa Gov. Robert Ray will give the com- mencement address. Among 410 candidates for graduation will be the first students to complete training in operating room technician, agricultural building services, insurance secretary and res- piratory therapy programs. The programs were all added to the Kirkwood curriculum during the last two years. The college graduated 585 persons in June. The August class includes those who completed studies during the summer. Ira Larson, assistant Kirk- wood superintendent, will serve as master of ceremonies. Morris Allen of Marion, a re- tiring member of the Kirkwood board of directors, will make welcoming remarks. Dr. Selby Ballantyne, Kirk- wood superintendent, will confer degrees and present diplomas and certificates. Soviet Commercial Exhibition -oves Mexican Relations Impn MEXICO CITY (AP) Af- ter five decades of roller coas- ter relations with Mexico, the Russians have opened a commercial exhibition here, with huge red trac- tors, Soviet-built cars and crew-cut specialists with thin .ties. President Luis Echeverria "inaugurated the exhibit, cele- brating 50 years of Soyiet- Mexican ties, and left with a handful of promises and an agreement to have Sovi- tractors tilling Aztec soil within a couple of years. None of the officials at the exhibit recalled the expulsion .of fiye Soviet diplomats in .1971 in connection with guer- illa actiyities in the country. The expulsion was the worst crisis between the two nations since relations were broken in 1930 by President Emilio Fortes Gil, who claimed there were spies in the Soviet em- bassy. The air apparently has fi- nally cleared. A Spaniard named Carmen, who liyes in Russia, guides visitors through the intricate problem of consumer market- ing in the Soviet Union. "Almost everyone has a she explained. "As a matter of fact, the prices have been slashed in recent months to further expand the market." She draws a picture of sun- filled days, happy children and Communist achievements. Everything at the exhibit shines. The car doors shut tight. Spectators arc dwarfed by huge industrial machinery. Cameras and microscopes arc sealed in glass cases. In the center is a replica of the Lunakhov lunar transmission station. "We don't need men on the a Soviet official says. "Our achievements are in ma- chine technology." On nearly every horizontal surface are stacks of litera- ture, slick magazines and leaflets. One official, weaving through the displays, said, "Our purpose is not to exploit. That's why we don't have fac- tories here. We offer excellent terms at very low interest to help developing countries." DRIVE SAFELY! Fall Casual and Sport Shoe SALE! Rogularly to 14.00 a pair Hundreds ol pans priced to scl Choose- Irom tirs, loafers or slip ons Sucda or Irolher styles in brown, Ion, novy or block, 1'ie.lurud am 3 ol nwiny looks 5V, 10. N M widths. Cedar Rapldt: Budgot Store and Llndale Plaza Iowa Cltyi Mall Shopping Confer on Six at Sytamoro Kathleen Thompson. Wilton, iiiil1- I'iscataway. economics Barbara Dolan, Rutherford. Illinois James Policy. Anlioch. his- lory. Steven Snell. Deerfield. religion; C.regory Pierce, Lake Bluff, psychology: Mark Friefeid, South Holiand. piili- Hclief 1'rograms: A Study in an tical science; John American Tragedy Mary Smith: Preliminary Observations on Behaviors in a Honors projects by three of the class members were: Amy Johnson: The Hoover Patrol Drives j Nominations Now Open Speed Reader R Calif. (AP) A California highway patrol car. red light flashing, weaves Nomination papers will he from lane to lane in the rush available Friday for the first Hollenhorst. sociology. Iowa From Cedar Rapids: David Semi-natural Population of ?alvaiu, Cordon avenue Black-tailed Prairie Dogs Kathleen NW. physical education: Michael Kane. 27lil Prairie Irivc NE, arts administration; lohn Krunibhnlz. 1818 Eleventh street SW, )sychology; Wallace Mestad, Twelfth avenue SW. philosophy and religion. Christine Waggoner, Central "ity. history; .lack Spore, 7airfax. physical education; Rosemary Wiese, Fort Dodge, psychology. From Marion: Thomas Malovvney, 915 West Ninth avenue, psychology; Mark Robertson. 910 South Eleventh street, speech; E. Ruth Smith, 940 Twenty-seventh street. English; Michael Svnbnda. Twelfth street, general science. Kansas Claudia Davis, Overland Park, sociology. Maryland Daniel Ford. Rockville, sociology; Earl Eisenhart. Weslgate, political science. Minnesota Timothy Fleischer, New Brighton. English; Amy John- son, St. Paul, history; Suanne Skng, St. Paul, religion. Missouri Connie Spor, Excelsior Springs, hiology and general science; Kenneth Flappaii. Kansas City, sociology; .lohn Roppolo, St. Charles, religion, philosophy and sociology. New Jersey Charles Miller, jr., Bergen- field, English; Thomas Thompson: Afghanistan: Case .Study of an Emerging Nation Son Discovers Mayor's Power DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) While it may he a cliche to say you can't fight city hall, John Jay Hubbard must know it's true. Two weeks ago. Hubbard, 39, resigned as city clerk in clash with the mayor over the Firing of an employe in thi clerk's office. The mayor blocked the resignation by keeping the matter off the city council agenda. "Hu does carry a big stick.' said Hubbard of the mayor who also happens to be hif father, Orville. "Sometimes that's hard to swallow." But he added, "I think wo'vi had a requiem We havi new respect for each other." Need a compact, economy The best buys arc lea lured in the classified ads; To Report Drug Violation Telephone Michael Doolej 377-8081 presents CANDI one honey of a new look.' 20.00 The big whirl curl airy masses of them is the new "in" fashion tteal for the young fashionables! See what a charmer you can be in this fluffy meringue of curls. Soft and lighl as cotton candy! Candi is made of long lasting and carefree Kanekalon" modacrylic. Downtown Second Floor hour freeway traffic carrying a big sign reading, "It's 55." At one- or two-minute inter- ils, Ihe lead patrol car is Unwed by others flashing ic same red lights and mes- iges. Units with public ridress horns make verbal arnings. The patrol said the reason ir the two-week experiment in Los Angeles area is ecause officers have noted hat motorists are generally isregarding the 55 mile an our speed limit and returning o the B5 mph speed of pre- nergy crisis days. "It's what you would call in- tant said ,pokesman LI. Boh Kovach in motorist reaction iftcr the program began Mon- day. He said the only major violator so far was a motor- cyclist who whizzed by on the freeway shoulder going about 80 mph. ON THIS DATE in 1940, Communist revolutionary Leon Trotsky died of wounds inflict- ed by an assassin in Mexict City." election of members of the seven-member Kast Central Regional Library System board of trustees. KCRL officials said Wednes- day the nomination papers tan be picked up at the auditor's iffice in each of the 10 coun- ties, or can be obtained by writing the Kasi Central Regional Library, Second avenue SE. Nomination papers, with signatures of 25 qualified voters in the district, must bo returned by Sept. 12 to appear on the November ballot. The library system was set up last year by the legislature and the first seven trustees were appointed by the gover- nor to serve until this year's election. The new trustees will take office Jan. 1. The districts in the East Central Regional Library Sys- tem and the current trustees are: Iowa, Johnson and Cedar counties: Thomas Summy of Iowa City and Mrs. Rosalie Shroeder of Marengo. Summy is chairman of the board. Linn and Jones counties: Mrs Dean Beer, Mrs. Paul Stewart and Dr. John Wilkin- son, all nf Cedar Kapids Jackson and Clinton coun- ties- John Manspeaker of Preston. Tama, Benton and Poweshiek counties: Mrs. Walter Kollmorgen of Belle Plaine. The East Central is one nf seven regional systems in the state set up by the general as- sembly "for the purpose of providing supportive library services to existing public libraries and to individuals with no other access to public library service." GAZETTE TELEPHONE NUMBERS or News, Sports, Bookkeeping, General Infoi mtion and Qlfiies Not Listed Below all ..........................398-8211 irculotion-Subsctiption Dept. 393-8333 Man. Ihru Sot. 8 a.m. !o 7 p.m. Sundays Until 12 Noon Holidays 11 o.m. to 7 p.m. Want Ads........... 398-8234 Won. Ihtu fri. 8 o.m. to 5 p.m. Soturdoy until 12 Noon Display Advertising............ 398-322! 8a.m. to 5 p.m. Morion Office 393-843 (illian's: August Special! Men's Crepe Sole Saddle Shoes and Loafers by Van North 21.88 Regularly 2B.OO Antique brown with ton scotch grain shoes have a soft, leather upper and a genuine plantation crepe tubber sole for comfort. Long wearing shoe is available in fie style. Casual loafer style in antique tan. Available in sizes from 7 to 11-12 Cifdar Rapids: Downtown Third Floor and Imdde Plow, Iowa City Mull   

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