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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 20, 1974 - Page 7

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 20, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Justice Sysfem Attracts Women Bv GORDON HANSON Asswioled Pieu Wn'er MOINKS. Iowa "My mnthiT didn't pressure me into what 1 shuuld pietty Karen Oauuiii. "She jusl had a lot of patience and prayed a lot." The prayers helped, because Miss C'lausun is succeeding in the Iowa justice system a profession noted fur its male dominance. Miss Clauson, 28 and single, is one of the top employes of the Iowa ('rime Commission, Another three women, including a criminologist and one who holds two masters' degrees, also have high posts "These gals are performing." says eominission director Ceorge Orr. "They can meet their counterparts in the crimi- nal justice system which is practically all male and do their jobs well. They've got respect." "We hire women as well as men because we want people for what they can do. Somebody didn't have to put a national law on us and say we had to have so many women em- ployed." Program 'Manager Miss Clauson, a pert with dark brown hair and searching blue eyes, has a criminology background and is the commission's program manager. Males head the agency's other two divisions. More than million in federal grants for area and lo- cal crime commissions crossed her desk in fiscal 1973 and the figure for fiscal 1974 will be higher. "The reduction of crime is what we're all about." she says. "All of our activities are geared to that objective." "We deal with the eight area crime commissions, and all state agencies such as the bureau of criminal investigation, department of public safety, the attorney general, drug abuse authority, the supreme court and the department of social services." The commission processes applications for grants from the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration It also sees to it that anti-crime programs and plans are implemented and completed. Miss Clauson views her role in law enforcement as that of a catalyst. "The commission has worked toward using LEAA funds for programs that have real impact on the criminal justice she says. "If you improve the system, and make it function better, you will have a reduction in crime." Supervises Specialists Miss Clauson, a 1967 graduate of the University of Iowa, has a secretary and supervises a staff of "five specialists and one application coordinator who insures that the work that comes in here by the tons gets to the right place." "The biggest thing I do is administer and make sure ev- erything is going right." She isn't a women's libber, but believes "females are The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Taes., Aug. 29. U74 These four women have successfully invaded a profession noted for its male criminal justice hold high administrative posts with the Iowa crime commission. "These gals are performing, they've got says commission director George Orr. From left: Carol Augustine, Barbara Baum, Karen Clauson and Susan Deagle. just as capable as anybody." She started with the commis- sion in 1970 as a programs analyst, then became a plans developer "in charge of writing, compiling and submitting annual action plans to the LEAA." Her present job may be the resull of getting "shoved into the types of discussion that allows you to supervise and get into decision-making she says. "I love it, I suppose it's because I've always had a hard time keeping my mouth shut. "When you're going to college, or even high school with regular academic courses, you're brought up in the same ways exactly like guys. Then all of a sudden you're supposed to switch to the absolute homemaker type. "I don't think there are very many females anymore who like grandmother sit at home. "Bless people like grandma, but the world is big enough and there are enough things to do that there's room for everybody to do whatever makes them happy." Miss Clauson entered the field of criminology "because I was very interested in the way the criminal justice system works." "I've always loved laws, such as common law in England and how we took it to America except in Louisiana where they have the Napoleonic Code which is its basic for state law." "Along the correctional side of it, Ihc prisons system. 1 thought there had to be a better way than what we were doing. "You can't take somebody (criminal) out of iheir envir- onment and into an abnormal environment (prison) for. say five years, and expect them to gn back home and live normal- ly. "That is really the basis of community-based corrections which we arc working with." Also holding responsible positions with the commission are Barbara Baum, a criminal justice statistical analyst; Susan Deagle, administrative assistant; and Carol Worlan Augustine, assistant plans developer. Mrs. Baum, 26, has a degree in sociology from Drake university and a master's degree in criminology from the University of Missouri. Mrs. Augustine, 24, has a bachelor of arts degree in soci- ology' from Simpson college. Mrs. Deagle, 3D, holds a bachelor of arts degree in con- stitutional history from C. W. Post college, a master's in the same field from the University of Wisconsin, another mas- ter's in special education from Long Island university, and has completed Radcliffe college's publishing procedures course. Sharon Johannsen Is Wed DBS MOINES Miss Sharon K. Johannsen and Harold L. Harrington, both of Kirksville, Mo., were married Saturday evening. The bride- groom is the son of Mrs. A.W. Harrington of 2030 First ave- nue ME, and W.G. Harrington of 308 Jacolyn drive NW, both of Cedar Rapids. The Kev. Norman Raedecke officiated at the 7 o'clock cere- mony at Hope Lutheran church. The bride, daughter of the Werner Johannsens of Al- toona, wore an organza gown fashioned with a re-embroi- dered lace bodice, lantern sleeves and a chapel train. Her tiered veil was caught to a crown of pearls and lace and she held a Bible topped with a cascade of white daisies and carnations. Mrs. Jack Friedrickson was her sister's matron of honor and Mae Alder was maid of honor. They wore gowns of blue sheer flocked nylon over taffeta designed with match- ing capelets. Each carried blue and white daisies. Ray Ferris served as best man. John McBee was groomsman and ushers were David Johannsen, the bride's Mrs. Harrington brother, Philip Weider and Mr. Friedrickson. Following the ceremony a reception was given in the church social rooms. After a brief wedding trip, the newlyweds will reside in Kirksville where both arc graduate students at North- east Missouri State university. Both were recently graduated from that same university. Golf Jones Park Junior Sixteen girls participated in junior girls final play of the season Monday. Medalist was Kathy Terrace. Championship winners of the club tourna- ment were determined in a "sudden death" playoff be- tween Kathy Terrace and Linda Frazier with Miss Terrace winning first. Flight winners were: Brenda Bass and Susie Frazier, first, and Lorene Kuehl and Stacy Kutz, second. Trophies will be awarded Saturday at the awards picnic at Jones park, Parkview pavilion. Any girl not contacted may call 364- 6960 for information. BRIDAL SHOWER GIVEN FOR MISS SUE DRAKER Miss Rene Nekola, 232 Thirty-first street NW, was hostess at a personal bridal shower given Sunday evening honoring Miss Sue Draker, Sept. 14 bride-elect of Ed Colby, 330 Fourteenth street, Marion. Fifteen guests shared the courtesy. Parents of the engaged couple are the Charles Drakers, 1260 Center street NE, and the Robert Colbys, 1765 Twenty-fifth ave- nue, Marion. REID-METHENY REUNION SUNDAY The annual Reid-Methcny reunion will be held at Jones park Sunday at A picnic and games arc planned. For further information call Mrs. Eldon Kenslon at 848-7124. Betty Mumby Becomes Bride Of Mr. Bluemle BELLE PLAINE Miss Betty Mumby, daughter of the Keith Mumbys of Ladora, be- came the bride of Dan Bluemle, son of the Virgil Bluemles of Belle Plaine, dur- ing a 2 o'clock ceremony Sat- urday. The Rev. Ambrose McAvoy officiated at SI. Michael's Catholic church. Following the ceremony a reception was given at the Belle Plaine Legion hall. A wedding dance was given later in the evening at the Ladora Legion hall. Brenda Grieder was maid of honor and Mary Mumby, sis- ter of the bride, was brides- maid. Doug Vavroch served as best man and Jim Willey as groomsman. Jim Bluemle, brother of the bridegroom, and Denny Brown seated guests. Also in the wedding party were Don Walton, lec- tor; Mary Goad, flower girl and Tim Mumby, ringbearcr. The bride wore a gown of dacron polyester organza styled with bishop sleeves and an empire bodice trimmed with ribbon and sequined scalloped Chantilace. Her veil was trimmed with matching lace and she carried an ar- rangement of white daisy pompons centered with an orchid. Her attendants wore empire gowns of purple flowered organdy. White picture hats completed their ensembles and each carried a bouquet of white daisy pompons. The couple will reside at 1415 Bevcr avenue SE, in Cedar Rapids. The bride- groom is employed by Amana Refrigeration. Inc. Parents of the bridegroom were hosts at a rehearsal dinner Friday evening at the Lincoln cafe. ON THIS DATE in 1961. the East Germans were busy building a wall along most of the 25-mile border between Kasl and West Berlin. AdvcrtKrmonl Do Your FALSE TEETH Drop, Slip, or Fall? Doii'l kvi'ji worryiiiK about vuur false tct h dropping at tlic? wrong (imc. A rritun1 ailhcsivo can lic'ln, FASTKmi'KivraiU'iUurMi a IOIIK- (T, fir I ni' Mrail.cr lutlil, Maki'H ciil- iiif; nnin- Fur inun> m-niriiy ami emu irl, iim- I'ASTKKTll DI-II- tun: Ail criivu 1'iiwilrr. UciUltrou tlniL (it iini I'tisttiuial to lii'alih. ytnir dcnliiil regularly. BLOWN-IN MINERAL WOOL INSULATION FHA APPROVED-5 YEAR FINANCING AVAILABLE GREAT PLAINS GAS Insulation Dept. 1101 Socond Ave. S.E. Phone 362-1186 or 365- 4647 Miss Is Bride of Mr. Jensen Miss Cynthia Marie Corkery. daughter of the Leland Cork- crys of Rowley, became the bride of Vernon Jensen during a one o'clock ceremony Satur- day at St. John's Catholic church. The Rev John (iossman officiated The bridegroom is the sun of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jensen of Dewar. Mrs. Karl White of Cedar Itaoids was her sisler's matron of honor and Kim Curtis was maid of honor. Other attendants were Miss Karen Hiihneman. Mrs. Steve Tennis, Miss Cyndi Kergesim and Miss Cathy Wegncr. (icne Ficken was the bride- groom's best man. Jeff and Jim Corkery, brothers of the tiride. were groomsmen as were Hill Hohneman, Dave Jensen and Bob Brasch. Clint Miller. Mr. White. Dan Xitcl- man and Ken Ingalls seated guests. The bride wore a long- sleeved gown of dacron or- styled with ruffles of Venise lace at the neckline and shoulders arid at the train. Her fingertip veil was held by a Juliet cap and she carried a cascade arrange- ment of gardenias. Her attendants wore ruffled dacron gowns in col- ors of ligiit pink. Nile green, light blue, orchid, hot pink and yellow, respectively. Matching picture hats and parasols completed their en- sembles. After the ceremony, a re- ception for 450 guests was given at the Gayla ballroom. The couple will live in In- dependence after a brief wed- ding trip. The bride is a grad- uate of Patricia Stevens in Milwaukee, Wis. The brideg- room was graduated from Upper Iowa university and is a teacher and coach at Inde- pendence high school. Society for Bridge The Shufflers Winners of the rubber bridge game played Monday at Noelridge P-.rk Christian church were: iorth-south Mrs. Kenneth .'ouro and Mrs. John McCi-udm, first, and Mrs. William Eyman and Mrs. Charles Fitzgerald, sec- ond; east-west Mrs. Bill Ho- ward and Mrs. Shirley Moore, first, and Mrs. William Hall, jr., and Mrs. Robert Gray- beal, second. Over-all winners were; Mrs. Moore and Mrs. Howard. The next game is scheduled Sept. 9 at 9 o'clock at the church. love is... being there when she reaches for you. Fords Settle In Capitol WASHINGTON (AP) President Ford and his family have settled into the White House and spent the first eve- ning at their new home enter- taining. The Fords hosted a private cocktail reception Monday night for 60 secret service men and their wives. "It was a way of saying goodbye and thank you" to the men who guarded the Ford family in their Alexandria, Va., home before they moved into the White House, said Nancy Howe, Mrs. Ford's personal secretary. A new detail of secret serv- ice look over Monday. The family's belongings were moved from their sub- urban home in a single van by the time the President and Mrs. Ford returned from a day's trip to Chicago Monday. The only furniture moved into the White House was the Ford's double bed and a blue leather easy chair that is the President's favorite. Other furniture and furnish- ings will go into storage while the Fords rent their Alexan- dria home during their White House occupancy, which Ford said probably will be 2V2 years. Mrs. Howe said the move went "very smoothly. Start an affair! Turn on a VISIT The Office of Dr. C. R. Kitchen Optometrist Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted Contact Lenses By appointment only 395-6256 (losfd Sun. and Man. Lindalc Plaza Features Vows Said Madonna Haddad, 1641 Ellis boulevard NW, and Peter John Hess were married Sat- urday afternoon at St. Pa- trick's Catholic church. The Rev. Martin T. Laughlin offi- ciated at the one o'clock cere- mony. Parents of the bridal couple are Mr. and Mrs. Felix J. Simkavitz, 428 Fourth avenue SW, and Mr. and Mrs. John J. Hess of route two, Cedar Rap- ids. Attending the bridal couple were Elinore Hays and Clar- ence A. Hess, Lockport, 111. John J. Hess, also of Lock- port, and Daniel P. Shonka seated guests. The bride wore an empire gown designed with an off- white chiffon bodice with a high ruffled collar and long full sleeves and an aqua chiffon skirt over taffeta. Her elbow-length aqua veil was caught to a lace-trimmed pill- box hat and she carried a nosegay of miniature aqua and white carnations. Her attendant wore a yellow A-line gown of chiffon over taffeta styled with accents of white Cluny lace, sheer Juliet sleeves and a bow at the A matching bow held her shoulder-length veil and she carried a nosegay of yellow, white and aqua daisy pompons. A reception for 300 guests followed the ceremony and was given at the Knights of Columbus hall. On return from a wedding trip to the Western states the couple will reside at the Ellis boulevard address. The bride- groom is employed by Collins Radio Co. BRUNCH, SHOWER FETE MISS ALICIA JONES A miscellaneous bridal shower and a brunch were given Sunday morning at 11 for Miss Alicia Jones, daughter of the Donald D. Jones' of 1427 Yuma drive NW. Co-hostesses to the 20 guests were Mrs. Charles Caughlan of Iowa City and Mrs. Robert Carnes. Miss Jones is the Sept. 14 bride- elect of Glen Geiger of 173 Sixteenth avenue SW. He is the son of the Charles Geigers of Liberty, Mo. 7> eJJeat WE'RE LICENSED WKIU For Free Inspection Call 363-1676 INSECT CONTROL SPECIALISTS locally Owned and Operated Sincu 1948 I5I6MT. VKRNON ROAD SK DKAK ABBY: My problem is a small one, but on second thought, are bad manners ever a small problem9 My husband and I would like your opinion of this situa- tion: We have two different families whom we invite to our home for dinner occasion- ally. (Not together.) The minute we sit down at the table, both fathers of these families ask one of their children to say the grace. Abby, am 1 out of line to think this shows extreme bad manners on their part? I al- ways thought it was up to the host and hostess to decide if grace was to be said at their table. And if so, by whom. Please print your reply. Perhaps these men or their wives will read your column and learn something. Or I may learn something if I am wrong. SOCIAL GRACE DEAR SOCIAL: You are not wrong. It's the host's or host- ess's perogative to decide if grace shall be said at his (or her) table, and If so, by whom. DEAR ABBY: I have a unique problem. I have been married to Elmer for six years. We are both in our late twenties. All my life I have been extremely overweight, but this last year, through a friend's inspiration, I was motivated to lose 120 pounds. (Yes, one hundred and twenty pounds.) Throughout my diet Elmer never indicated that he ap- proved or disapproved, but now that my life has changed as much as my figure, Elmer has decided he doesn't like the "new me" and wants me to regain the weight I sacrificed so much to get rid of. Perhaps I should mention that Elmer is fat and we used to have a lot of fun together eating all the things we shouldn't but those days are gone for me. Now Elmer feels betrayed and I feel guilty, because when he married me he really like me the way I was. I am torn between staying thin, which I am so proud to be or letting myself go, to please Elmer. FORMERLY FAT DEAR FORM: For heaven's sake, stay thin. Join the Ov- ereater's Anonymous and let them help yon. And take Elmer with you. They are a great, loving, caring fellow- ship. If Elmer doesn't flip for them and their program, I'll eat my caloric counter. COUPLE HONORED SUNDAY AT WEDDING SHOWER Miss Marie Vileta and Les- ter MacLean were honored at a wedding shower and family dinner given Sunday at 4 at the home of Mrs. Leo Vileta, 1120 Twenty-first avenue SW. Mrs. Richard Vileta was co- hostess to the 20 guests at- tending. Parents of the en- gaged couple, who will wed Aug. 31 at Shueyville United Methodist church, are the Fred Viletas of route two. Cedar Rapids, and Mrs. Malcolm MacLean of Solon. Zenith-In Hearing Aids A NameVbu CanTrust And your Zenith Hearing Aid Specialist is one you can determine if a hearing aid will help, to assist in selecting the Zenith aid most suitable to your needs and to perform all necessary services to insure your satisfac- tion. 10 Day Money-Back Guarantee Your trust deserves Zenith's guarantee of satisfaction Try any Zenith Hearing Aid at home, at work... anywhere. If you are not completely satisfied, you can return it to your Zenith Hearing Aid Specialist within 10 days of pur chase and your money will be fully refunded. (Except for custom-made earmold.) And nsk your Zenith Hearing Aid Specialist about Zenith's 5-Year After-Purchase Plan B.ittories for all makes of F cdicaZ A l ij -STrtt Medical Arts Surgical Supply 2740 Ave. NE Phon.i 364-41J6 STORI HOURS] 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Saturday Houri: 8 a.m. till Noon   

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