Cedar Rapids Gazette, August 19, 1974, Page 22

Cedar Rapids Gazette

August 19, 1974

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Monday, August 19, 1974

Pages available: 22

Previous edition: Sunday, August 18, 1974

Next edition: Tuesday, August 20, 1974

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About Cedar Rapids GazetteAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Pages available: 2,913,962

Years available: 1932 - 2016

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.05+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : Cedar Rapids Gazette, August 19, 1974

All text in the Cedar Rapids Gazette August 19, 1974, Page 22.

Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 19, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa tut Cfc'duf ’Rtipitta Kelly McCormick, 5, of 2300 Fifth avenue SE, gives her name to a judge after winning the tricycle race for 5-year-olds in the bush league. Kevin Anderson, 2, of 2717 Second avenue SE, was frightened by the cameramen at the finish line, so his mom. Mrs. Gordon Anderson, came out to help. Some of the kids didn’t even cross the finish line, simply turning their trikes around and heading the other way. Kevin was first in the division for 2-year-olds. Gazette photos by Dale Hankins Grief Mrs.Fred Bilky of St. Paul was supported by police officers after being told her 3-year-old daughter. Jennifer, had died in a fire at a baby sitter’s apartment. Sent Flying Tiny Emiko Maki, right, sent Masami Ikeda flying during a demonstration of the ancient Japanese martial arts at San Francisco’s Japan Center. Thirty-two experts in the troupe from Japan demonstrated their skills during a visit to San Francisco following performances at Expo '74 in Spokane. This particular art is Jujitsu. Human Engineering Puts More People Into Limited Areas Photo Finish Ronnie Irvin came out of the pack to win the 5-year-old bigw heels race in the third annual Biggybank Bike Races at Bever park Sunday afternoon. Later, he was stunned but happy to hear he’d won. A total of HOO cyclists participated in the day’s events. Entries in the local events totaled 475, while 125 top racers participated in Sunday morning’s American Bicycle League races. Local races included bush league, cookies, hotdogs, unicyles, young adults, adults and the jet set. Dale Stefine led the senior men’s race most of the way and finished first. Picture shows the start of the race. Young adults, 14 to 17, went four laps; adults, 18 to 26, six laps, and the jet set. 26 and up, three laps in their respective events. AP Wirephoto UPI Telephoto Parade Rest When Strasburg, Va , firemen planned their annual parade, they probably didnt consider a special unit for dogs But ‘Bizer” sat patiently through the parade and seemed to enjoy it all — except for a loud siren and a Civil war cannon blast. By Art Buckwald There is a new science in this country which is called human engineering. The object of human engineering, as I understand it. is to fit human beings into inhuman conditions. I made this discovery while riding on an airplane from New York to Washington the other day. Seated next to me was a man who was taking very careful measurements of the space between us and then writing it in a notebook. I asked him what he was doing, and he said he was a human engineer, and it was his job to see how many people he could squeeze on an airplane without doing permanent bodily harm to the passengers. “We used to have five seats across,’’ he said proudly, “but we’ve managed to put another seat in each row, and as you can see we can now get six people across.’’ “How on earth did you do it?” I asked him. "We cut the center aisle in half. The passengers have to walk sideways, but just think of what the extra seats mean to the company’s payload.    BUCHWALD “Which, of course, is all that you're worried about.” “You can bet your sweet whistle on that,” he said. “I’m very concerned, though, that there still seems to be room between your knees and the seat in front of you." “Only about two inches,” I said. Another it wit of Seat* “Well, if you take two inches away here and two inches away there, you can put another row of seats on the plane.” “Then my knees should be flush against the seat ahead?” “Naturally, my dear boy. You can’t expect legroom on such a short hop. One more thing. I was wondering how you feel about a reclining seat as opposed to a stationary one." “I prefer a reclining seat. It gives me a chance to rest a little ” He started writing rn his book; “Customer too tempted by reclining chair, so I strongly recommend stationary kind which will allow us two more rows in back ” He looked at me. “You came on board with a package What did you do with it?” “I put it under my seat.” He wrote again: “Customer can still get package under seat, which means we’re wasting valuable space which could better In* used for air freight.” Think of Erorfiihing “You people really think of everything.” I said “We try to.” he replied, “but ifs a tough struggle Say, have you ever thought of putting people in the baggage rack overhead?” I asked him. He studied it for a few moments. “It could In* done. if we could fit them in horizontally ” He made another note: “Check about stuffing people into overhead baggage rack ” “You covered all the bases,” I said in admiration “Not quite,” he said, staring at the washroom AP Wirephoto ;

RealCheck