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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 13, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                9 The Cedar Rapids Gazelle: Tues.. 13. Women Seek Political Base By Edward P. Butler Conn (CPU If 1974 is remembered for anything politically momentous besides the impeaehmem issue. i( may be recalled as the year of "women in politics Ahum 1.2IKI women in Ihe nation are seeking election to slate legislatures in higher oiliccs, according lo ihe Wash- ington-based women's political caucus, the country's largest women's political group III all liie women liie 'li-year old of an imimgraiit baker who settled in Connecticut perh.ips !n-; the emergence of the political woman She is Ella Tamhnssi Grasso tP-Conn i. her parly's candidate for governor against another member of congress 20 years younger. Hep Robert II Sleele (li Conn I If elected. Mrs Grasso. now (lie odds-oo lieeome Hie nation's highest-ranking woman official and IN only female governor A November victory would also make her ihe only woman governor who won the office on her own merits Three other women governors followed in their husbands' At present, there are no governors or I are women. The house of representatives includes only IB women Twenty-sis women office am) there are only -14! women serving in lures Lesser political contacls (luring Ihe years she served as secretary of the Male before being elected to congress in IM7II Her successor. Democrat Gloria Schaffer. 43. is again running for secretary of the state. Ihe office both parlies traditionally reseru- for women Her Republican opponent is Mis xtily liolslel .1 loliluli melllbei Schaffer believes ihe feminist movement and "con scionsncss has increased acceptability of worn Offices political triumph state. A former liiuversitv lecturer. Fong. who on r long-si. crusade against pay toilet-., defeated four en and another wom.iii She believes pay toilets discnmi- ag.mist women who IIM- Iheni more frequently than men li elected, Fong. who was horn in the backroom her ills' Chinese laundry, would become Caliinnua's IIM vep Yvonne Brathwatle the first incumbent congresswuman to .renommation tor another lerm .m Joyful Victory UP! Wirophoto Rep. Ella Grasso (D-Conn.) is joyful after getting her party's guberna- torial nomination. She is one of many women across the United States who is seeking federal, state and local governmental posts. It's virtually impossible to count iliose dates for city councils, local school boards, Hislices of the peace or the host of lesser off lages and cities across America The women's education fund, an offshoot of ihe Women's Political Caucus, holds seminars around Ihe nation bringing together women incumbents with local female candidates and workers. Their seminars teach Ihe basics of politics canvass- ing, fund-raising and media work. Another national group promoting female candidates is the Women's Campaign Fund, run by Maureen Aspin. wife of Rep. l.es Aspin The plans lo give mon- ey to women candidates with good election prospects Mrs. Grasso, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Mount llol- yoke college, was asked before the primary whether her gender would become a campaign issue. A professional poll taken for Ihe democratic party had shown Connecticut voters were generally sympathetic to feminist goals. "I thought this might have been a factor because I had been told it would be. hut interestingly, this lias not she said. "I've talked with thousands of people since I started my campaign, and I have no! yet seen any indication of rejection because 1 am a woman. "I think that one of the reasons is thai I've been around a long she said. "People know me. they know my capac- ity for work and my involvement and my interests, and they'll make their judgments accordingly Built Nevada Candidates in There arc several women running for statewide office Nevada, but they are considered Inns-shots to win in Nov- ember or even snrv ive the September primary election Maya Miller, .in. Washoe Valley oil heiress, is seeking Ihe Democratic nomination for I'. S. senate. I'nnsidered a liberal in traditionally conservative Nevada, she is expected to lose Ihe primary to I.t. Gnv Harry Reid. Two women are seeking I be gubernatorial nomination in Nevada: Republican Shirley Crumpler, a l.as Vegas di- vorcee, and Democrat Ol.ga Bond Cnvelli, til. of Reno. In Hawaii. Republican Diana Hanseii. a young blonde, is trying tor a second time to unseal Hep. Patsy Mink, Demo- crat of lie 2nd congressional district. Sue' Stricklin, whn says she vvill accept no monetary contributions, is lieutenant governor on the Republican ticket. tinning Mrs. Grassn built a statewide reputation and marie maiiv Julie, David View Ford's First Speech By Cheryl Arvidson WASHINGTON (UPI) Julie and David Eisenhower sat in silence Monday night as President Ford promised no more "buggings or breakins" or other government invasions of privacy. The rest of the audience clapped for 25 seconds, the longest period of applause during the speech. The daughter and son-in-law of former President Richard M. Nixon were the guests of his successor and sat in his special section of the galler- ies, but they stared straight ahead with no expression as President Ford said: "There will be no illegal tappings, eavesdropping, bug- gings or breakins by my administration. There will be hot pursuit of tough laws to prevent illegal invasions of privacy in both government and private activities." Nixon had sent Ford a message congratulating him on the speech, according to a spokesman in San Clemente. Calif, Julie, who had been Nixon's stoutest defender, said she had talked with her par- ents and they are "just fine." "They're getting along all said David. Julie, 25, has been supervis- ing the packing of the Nixon family's personal effects and their removal from the White House. She rode up to the White House Monday after- noon on a bicycle wearing blue slacks and a blue and white jersey, looking unhappy For the first time in years, she was not accompanied by secret service agents. Asked how Ihe packing was going Monday night, she turned and said: "I'm not giv- ing any interviews private I citizen." has been working as an associate editor of Curtis Publishing Co. and is a member of their editorial hoard A company official said "she is very much on the job" and would be flying In Indian- apolis Tuesday to discuss a cover lor a forthcoming Satur- day Fvening Post David is a law student at George Washington univcrsi- tv. Society for Women Features LeClere-Booth Vows Are Said Deborah Sue Bradley Dale Thirtieth street married Sunday Lel'lere and Booth, 160fi NW, were during a 2 o'clock ceremony at the Mirror lounge. Officiating was the Rev. Robert M. Putt. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Robert Simon. 291 High- and drive and George Lebecla. 353 Twenty-fourth street NW. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Dale K. Booth of Washington. For her wedding the bride wore a halter top styled with a scoop neckline and pants of white metallic knit A floral headpiece completed her ensemble and she held a bouquet of orange, yellow and Dance Teacher: Betty Ford Is 'Great Gift' MRS. (I.AUA OI.TROMiK FETED AT OPEN HOUSE CKNTKK POINT Mrs Clara Oltro.tw of Greenfield was honored at an open house Friday afternoon at the home of Mrs. E. M. CraiK Hostesses were Mrs. ('raid's (laiifjIiliTs: Mrs. Jim Wood and Mrs. Leo Ilavran, both of Cedar Rapids. Mrs. Booth lavender daisies, pompons and miniature carnations Gloria Hahne was maid of honor and bridesmaids were Cindy O'Toole and Cris They wore halter jumpsuits in orange, yellow and lavender crepe, respec- tively. Each attendant carried a bouquet o! while daisies. Serving as besl man was Pat Williams Groomsmen were Dan McNeal and Max Meyer of Ames. Seating gnesls were Jim Shmiek and Tom Flue. A reception for 22o guests was given at Morgan Creek park idler the ceremony. By Anna Kisselgoff (c) 1974 New York Times News service NEW YORK "A very- great gift to us in America" is the way Martha Graham .de- scribes her former dance student Elizabeth Ford, the new First Lady. To prominent members of the dance world, the fact that the White House is now occupied by someone who went through the discip- ine of their own training, has )een met with great interest. Miss Graham, the dancer ind choreographer whose name became synonymous ivith modern dance, recalled that she had person- ally taught the former Eliza- beth Bloomer here in the early 9411s. Comparing Betty Ford to mother of her famous pupils, Mrs. Grarr.m said. "I re- member her as I remember Jette Davis, standing out in he class. "You remember certain >eople. They have a certain plus quality that doesn't de- tach yon from them complete- ly, and yon remember them as a personality rather than as a dancer." The fact that Mrs. Furd has apparently maintained her interest in dance was also not- ed. "I feel confident that be- cause of Mrs. Ford's pas! in- terest in the art, that she vvill work for the betterment of the arts and the said Mrs. Ilebekah Ilarkness. director of the Ilarkness Ballet On April (i. Mrs. Ford and her daugh- ter. Susan, flew to New York to be Mrs. Ilarkness' guests al Ihe opening of the new Ilark- ness Iheater In a statement issued through a spokesman. Mrs Ilarkness added that she "feels very indebted to Mrs Ford because of her interest in the dance." Mrs. Graham observed that it was Mrs. Ford, when in- terviewed at the time that her husband became vice-presi- dent, who had mentioned her training at the Graham school. "It's always nice to be remembered in that she said. "And it is unique that a woman so much in the news has said that she studied with me. Very few are so gra- cious." Miss Graham said that Mrs. Ford had telephoned her since her husband became vice- president on Dec. li and had planned to attend a perform- ance by the Martha Graham Dance company in Washing- ton, but was prevented from doing so by another commit- ment. "I fell she made a very defi- nite gesture to the dance the Miss Graham added. Miss Graham, who has often spoken about the discip- line that (lancers must achieve and has even composed a (lance piece on the subject of was asked what influence the Graham training might have had on Mrs. Ford "The dance or her mem- ory of it has kept her Miss Graham replied. "Part of a training of a dancer is to meet a situation with courage and the necessity bir complete honesty The choreographer and (lancer, now XII years old. said Mrs. Ford was listed in her card file as Illoomer "and was culled Betty Bloomer." at the time. Miss Graham taught al her former school at Fifth avenue Bridge Iowa City Tournament Results of the Iowa City sec- tional tournament played Fri- day, Saturday and Sunday are: Master's Pairs Keith Han- son of Marion and Alan Stout of Tipton, first, and Charles High of Bettendorf and Paul Womack of East Moline. 111., second. Board A Match Team Mr. Hanson and Bob Evans of Davenport, first, and Mr. Stout and Mr. High, second. Open Pairs Mr. Womack and Jim Letts of Rock Island. first, and Dave Met lee of Mason City and Betty An- dersen of Marshalltown, .sec- ond. Swiss Team Mr. Han- on and Steve Tucker of 'hicago, first, and Royce McCray of Cedar Rapids and Mr. High, second. The Shufflers Winners of the rubber game played Monday at .Noelridge Park Christian church were: North-south Mrs Ralph Smith and Mrs. Mary Farley, first, and Mrs. Alan Langen- "eld and Jerry F.lsea. second; east-west Mrs. iVilliam Hall, jr and Mrs. lames Igou. first, and Mrs. )ick Grodl and Mrs Robert Ireckman, second. Over-all I'inners were Mrs. Smith and 'Irs Farley. The next game .'ill be played Monday at !l al ie church. ON THIS DATE in 'resident Nixon signed a )illion highway bill, permit- ing, for the first lime, the use if funds of the Federal High- way Trust J-'und for mass transit New Hampshire has women candidates in each of its two congressional districts. Mrs. Helen Bliss, Democrat, a Quaker grandmother from New Ipswich, is challenging six- lerm Rep. James Cleveland an attorney. "I think we need a few more women to support the ones who are she said. "I'm getting a very encouraging reaction. They all say, 'We're glad you're running. It's about time we had a good she said. In the second New Hampshire race. Democrat Mrs. Sylvia Chaplin, is seeking the seat being vacated by Rep. Louis Wyman t a senate candidate. In Oregon. Sen. Betty Roberts is heavily favored to win nomination for the vacancy created by the death of Sen. Wayne Morse. She would oppose Sen. Robert Packwood in the November election. Florida has a serious woman candidate for U. S. senate with public services commissioner Paula Hawkins, who in her upset victory over a Democrat in 1972 campaigned on consumer issues as "just a housewife from Maitland." Gail Rimmer Is Bride WATKRLOO SI. Ed- ward's Catholic church prov- ided Ihe setting Saturday for the marriage of Miss Gail Kalhryn Kimmer. former resi- dent of Cedar Rapids, and William John Lavin. The Rev. Thomas Lavin, uncle of the bridegroom, officiated at the 2 o'clock ceremony. Parents of the bridal couple are Mr. and Mrs. L. Rimmer of Waterloo and John J. Lavin of Chicago, and the late Mrs. Josephine Lavin. Attending the bride as matron of honor was Mrs. Donald J. Huschle of Cedar Rapids, her sister. Other at- tendants were Mrs. Car! Bruno, another sister. Mrs. Tom Campbell of Cedar Rap- ids, and Miss Carol Charles. Thomas P. Schnfield served lie bridegroom as best mar, and Mr. Bruno. Mr. Huschle mil John F. Heneghan were groomsmen. Mrs. Lavin ceremony, a Crow Nesi Sitter Loses 30 Pounds SPOKA.NK. Wash. (ITIi Crow's nest siller Jmnie Cox- says s'be'll end her stint Aug. 21 after HI! days, having estab- lished a world's record and losing at least pounds. "I want lo spend some time with my family while there's -till some summer said the2ii-year-old housewife. "Be- side-. I've done what I sel out to do It's dumb to stay up any BLOWN-IN MINERAL WOOL INSULATION FHA APPROVfD-5 YEAR FINANCING AVAILABLE The couple plans a brief weddmj! trip and will reside at Ihe Ihe Thirtieth slreel address on return. The bride Is employed by Ilie Mirror lounge and Ihe bridegroom is a musician wilh Ihe Do's and iJon'is. GREAT PLAiNS GAS Insulation Dopt. 1101 Second Ave. S.t. Phone 362-11 86 or 365-4647 SAVE 20% TO 30% oi'it K.vriiiBi; ixvE.vroiiv DOUBLE KNITS yd. RIBBING per inch 104 FALL FABRICS 20% OFF SPRING FABRICS 30% OFF THE RAG BARN I 725 14th ST. MARION OPFN MONDAY THURSDAY 'TIL 9 reception was given for 125 guests at the Flk's club. On return from a wedding trip to San Francisco. Calif.. Ihe couple will reside in Chicago. The bride, a gradu- ate nf Mount Mercy college, is on leave from the Cedar Rap- ids Community schools and will begin graduate studies at Loyola university in Chicago. The bridegroom, a graduate of Loyola, is employed by the First National Bank of Chi- cago. By Abigail Van Buren DFAlt ABin M'. '.ufe i wonderful wom.in I c.i predate her iii.iny good lies but she has one l.illll lli.il drives me ie distraction When she wanis 1 me. she writes me a noii- ICs not as u we wi t.iL'clher hull "1 the When I gel to 111, a note in illy p< forgcl lo gas up your i ar please pay Ihe elei trie bill At breaklasi she taped a note lo iny ii.ilhmom mir ror "Are you uoing 'o do something about yi.ur er's birthday which is nest Sunday t h" should I'1 How can I gel ;iie across to ibis woman that she has a voice to talk with and 1 have ears to hear vviili and I wish she would eommuuifale vvilh. p.io vcrb.iih? Thanks BCGGF.D IN EI'GKNE DEAR Ise your voice in gel the message to her ears. (On second thought, since she's so note-happy, write her a note.) HEAR ABBY- I've been struggling with this unihlem for a year and can't seem lo come up with a solution. I am 27, reasonably attrac- tive and divorced. U'hen a girl is 21 and not yet married, siie can say no lo a fellow and use the excuse thai she is saving herself for marriage But when she's 27 and divorced, what can she say that will lie acceptable? If I say. "I don't believe in sex outside marriage." il sounds like I'm trying lo rope myself another husband. which is not necessarily true. How can I get around this? What I need is some clever saying that will get me off the liook without making me sound like a goody-goody. "STUMPED DEAR STUMPED: What makes you think you have to either deliver or enme up with an excuse? Surely you have something other than sex to offer a man. Just say: and don't feel that you have to Justify it. Problems? You'll feel better f you get it off you chest. For personal reply, write to 
                            

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