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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Monday, August 12, 1974 - Page 1

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 12, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- Chance of rain rarly lomghl, becoming clear fry Tuesday, laws to. night, mid 60s. Highs Tuesday, mid 80s. CITY FINAL 15 CENTS i'-lr.il IPi, YORK TIMES FORD Blacks Robu N 3-Day Cyprus If Truce Broken Race Hate By I'nitcd Press International Greek Cypriot national guards men traded rifle and mortar fir with Turkish villagers on Cj I Prus Monday, breaking the un (AP, eas, which hadfcheW Authorities said Monday that! the last three days, a U.N three armed black men boarded 'spokesman reported in Nicosia a Greyhound bus and raped a! Agreement was reported closi Cahf. pregnant teenage girl, pistol in Geneva on plans to permi the Turkish and Greek Cyprio whipped a man and robbed all leaders to w'ork out their owr 34 passengers before making a constitutional problems but the fighting Monday jeopardized thi getaway. A passenger said one of the robbers kept screaming, 'I hate you, I hate you, you white Give me your mon- ey'." A Ventura county sheriffs spokesman said the girl, who was not identified, was six months' pregnant. The spokes- man said she was raped in the restroom aboard the bus, but was otherwise unharmed .and continued the trip. "Nightmare" The trio boarded the San Francisco-bound bus at North Hollywood and pulled out hand guns and a sawed-off rifle abou 30 minutes later. As one of the robbers kept a pistol on the driver and another stood at the rear, the third walked down the aisle demanding money anc valuables from the passengers, police said. Glenn Coons, 56, of Santa Bar- bara, was hit with a gun after he told the robbers he wasn' carrying any money, deputies said. "It was a said Mats Grape, 24, a student visit- ing here from Sweden. "I was frightened. The blacks were so full of hate and so nervous, it made me frightened." The gunmen, all identified as (Continued: Page 3, Col. 7.) Grim Outlook on Corn, Soybeans WASHINGTON (AP) The nation's corn corp, plagued by heavy rains last spring and drouth this summer, is ex- pected to be 12 percent below last year's record harvest and: the smallest since 1970, the agriculture department said Turkish and Greek areas. Monday- New Proposals outbreak of once again Geneva talks. The crisis earlier had been reported eased by the Greek Cypriot decision to free the firs of thousands of Turkish war pris oners on Cyprus and to evacu ate some Turkish enclaves. Reinforcing The U.N. said fighting Mon- day around the southeastern villages of Melousha, Arsos and Ayia Kabir followed light artil lery exchanges east of the Tur kish beachhead at Kyrenia dur ing the night, the first reported shooting following three days a calm on the island, the spokes man said. The fighting broke out when the guardsmen began reinforc ing their positions around the three villages, the U.N. spokes man said. The Turks let loos> with rifle, mortar and machine gun fire until U.N. peace keep ing troops in the area inter vened. "The two sides are both scared of starting up the shoot ing again but they refuse to pu down their arms. It's a tricky situation and all it needs is for some jumpy person to fire a shot and they'll all start up again, the spokesman said. "Procedural Progress" The British, Greek and Tur- kish foreign ministers worked in Geneva to find a basis for a new political setup in Cyprus that would be acceptable to both 3reek and Turkish Cypriots, but progress was slow despite what Britain called some "procedural jrogress." Turkish sources said Secre- ary of State Kissinger inter- vened in a personal telephone call to Turkish Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit Sunday to save he talks from threatened break- down over Turkish demands that the island be divided into PRICE Based on indications as of Aug. 1, the 1974 crop is esti- mated at bushels, 678 million less than last year, the department's crop reporting board said. Moreover, the estimate first of line season made from actual field surveys is about 984 mil- lion bushels below the minimum USDA had projected on July 25. The 1974 soybean crop was estimated at bushels, down 16 percent or 252 million bushels from the record last year. The sources said Kissinger put new "proposals" for a set- tlement to Ecevit who promised to consider them. Details of the proposals were not disclosed. The three ministers Sunday held a day of on-again-off-again negotiations and continued their talks over dinner Sunday night at British Foreign Secretary James Callaghan's lakeside hotel. Conference officials said they decided to cancel a full confer- (Continued: Page 3, Col. 8.) >yspension Asks Restraint by All; TV Talk at 8 Tonight WASHINGTON (UPI) Pres-ilast up to and through the clec-[ ident Ford, preparing his first; tion, because we want to cooper-j congressional mcsagc that was'ate and work in partnership I expected to stress economic; with President Ford and the ad-l matters, Monday said a recent he said. General Motors price increase, Appearing on NBC-TV's "To- should not be taken as a signal i day Mansfield said; By Mike Dcupree for a new round of higher; fighting inflation should bej The indefinite suspensions of prices. i Ford's top priority. "Whatever, five Cedar Rapids police of- In his strongest statement thinks is necessary to de-jfjccrs have been upheld by the the four days he has been Pres-'creasc inflation from the'civil service commission. ident, Ford denounced the GM present rate of 12 percent, wej The commission, which heard urnnlH JL_ _ rr- Upheld price rise and said, "In this crit- ical period the President of the United States cannot call on others to sacrifice if one or would show." would give consideration Mansfield said. "And we would eagerly await any initiative he IN RUNNING FOR VICE-PRESIDENT- Former New York Nelson Rockefeller arrives at the O'Hare International Tower hotel in Chi- cago Sunday. He addressed the Republican Governors Assn. on land use, drug abuse and campaign research. more parts of the economy de-j cide to go it alone." i Ford will address the nation i on television at 8 p.m. CDT Monday night before a joint ses- sion of congress. Press Secre-; tary Jcrald terHorst said Ford will urge wage-price restraint and discuss the inflation-ridden economy. Meet Hussein terHorst also said Ford will meet Jordan's King Hussein Friday, the first foreign chief of state to visit since the new ad- misistration took office. Ford also will meet Wednesday with the visiting Egyptain Foreign Minister Ismael Fahmi. In his statement on GM, Ford said, "I was very disappointed and I hope the General Motors' action will not be read as a sig- nal by other auto companies or other industries. "It is essential particularly at this time that all segments of Mansfield said congress would (Continued: Page 3, Col. 6.) Continue Hunt For 4 Prison Escapees LEWISBURG, Pa. (AP) itate police continued their earch Monday in the thick voods of Bald Eagle state forest or four inmates who escapee rom Lewisburg federal peniten- iary on Saturday morning. Police said they did not know vhether the four were armed ut termed them "dangerous.'1 The escapees included a former reen Beret serving a 45-year erm for skyjacking. It is believed the men are hid- flg in the dense and moun- ainous woodlands of the state ark located some 20 miles rom the prison. State and local police were oined by the FBI Saturday fter the men made their way to reedom by commandeering a arbage truck inside the prison nd driving away under a hail f gunfire from the guard owers, crashing through two ocked chain-link gates. Authorities identified the four as: Richard McCoy, jr., 31, of Provo, Utah, convicted of h jacking a United Airlines jet ir 1972 after bailing out wit ransom; Joseph Have 0, of Philadelphia; Larry Bag ley, 36, of Des Moines, Iowa and Melvin D. Walker, 35, Merely, Mo. The latter three were servin terms for bank robbery plu extra terms for previous a tempts to escape, according t William Bones, associate war den of the minimum-securit prison. After the men fled the priso they drove several miles to farmhouse where they tied u two women and stole a car. Ne: ther of the women was injured. Police said they lost the es capees' trail somewhere in fhi maze of mountain roads in th  thc snurcc hc ectrical power for three hours' mcaPt Pentagon will have londay morning. Hit Power Line Iowa Electric Light and Power o. officials said lightning nocked out a trans- lission system at a.m. Power restored at various (Continued: Page 3, Col. G.) to absorb the increased cost, Today's Chuckle A secret is something you tell only one person at a time. coovnoiii could bring the first strain be- Itweeii thi.' new President and Secretary of Defense Sclilc-i Farm singer, who has said U. Financial forces already arc thin. i Marion Ford, who served for years on' Movies the house defense appropri-j Society aliens subcommittee, supports Sports many of the key weapons pro-; State grams which have been urged: Television by Schlesingpr and former Pres-l Want Ads ident Nixon. I 18 18 Daily Record j Deaths ;i Editorial Features G 11 9 17 8 13-16 10 21-25   

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