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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 11, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 11, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                IDA Rapids Gazette: SOB.. Aag Controversy Lingers Around DDT WASHINGTON (I'PI) The pesticide DDT hes been banned in the I'.S for more than two >fjr> a.-> a pussibit to heallh. but the comroversv surrounding it lingers as per- sistently as tne poisonous ehemK'Ut HSelt The "In uunnds ami .irL'Ur ments were impelled recetUlv when ThiMiias .hike-, a all- biiH-hemist wruiiii; in Amenran Mcdir.tl ASM] railed (or I'd IT s I'eltirn "as a publu- health measure fur that are essential in the ciuilrol irlM'C'.s Moth Si'ourue .lukes -an! :hc .I'.ine. 1971 on DDT political rather thun scientific. He urL'i'd a mure lenient poll; v on In ciittihat surh scoiirws a- the ninth infestation of forests in the eastern I'. S. DDT'- pnssihlo role as a cause nf cancer is unproved -peeiilation he said, ami it- adverse effects mi wildlife. as reproduction of ea- ul'.'.s, falcons and nther bints, is -till subject to dispute I'hder the I'.nurnnmental Prelection V'ency's han. HUT still can be used for public health purpose-, mclmlin.: ''f and certain other les I'he KI'A approved ,'t-ul'. "1m combat the ninth in Douglas d: fm'ests of Oregon. Washington and Idaho, and the pea leaf weevil in northern Idaho and ra-tern inirtim Natural Viruses The aycncv that parls "f these area- be treated liv allernate method- to te-t their which the I S forest ire did A for- est service -poke-man later -aid OUT was not needed in -mile area- because natural viruses took up the against the moths, but that HOT was the only answer (or most uf the acreage in- Viilved Likewise, DDT was not needed in Idaho because of an unusual outbreak of aphids which secreted a honeydew- iike substance and trapped ninth larvae, leaving them prey for spiders and other nat- ural enemies. Nonetheless, the forest serv- ice remains convinced lhai DDT is essential lor treating epidemic -HiM'ions. and some agriculture department offi- cials would like to have easier Till' Knvimmiienlal 1'eten-e which the suc- cessful battle against DDT in IHTil, said the experience alternate pe-ticides showed DDT was no! needed at all 'The environmental evid- ence on which DDT was canceled is -mind." -aid Wil- liam Butler. :i Hind lawver. "In this country we need DDT. In the years since its lancellatiuii we have found that alternatives are available and have been available .ill Butler believes .hikes' argu- ments are old. Inn attracted attention nnlv because Ihev appeared in the AMA .loiirna! There are always people who want in hylil the Civil win- over, too." he said. When the KPA hanned DDT u said the most damaging case against it was its persist- ence. By World Health estimates, fully twn- tlurds of all DDT used in the world since 1M3X is still some- where in the environment, from the food chain to resi- dues in body lal .hikes. Butler and the others disagree on how dangerous that condition, is, as thev do DDT's role as a cancer Death Klixir I untinmiw controversy over ppr liache! 1'ar-on called an "elixir of death in her bestseller "Silent Spring" a ;tocade anil, Mas prompted KI'A tu review the entire issue under friiin emigre- Henry Korp. deputy assist- ant KI'A administrator for pesticides programs, told I l'I "it will lie nine months before ue have a definitive answer. We are reviewing old informa- tion and lookhiK at some new. hopuii! to a few hole- in the dike." The review. said one spokesman, "is not layitiK ihe foundation for some kind of major turnaround un the 1072 ban." but rather at DDT's cost versus its benefits and whether it can be used on -nine minor crops. Mercy Names 6 Good TimeWas Had A good time was had by all during the first All-Star Olym- pics day at St. Luke's hospital last week. Some 50 psychiatric patients from the second and third floor east wings of the hospital par- ticipated in activities ranging from egg throwing to pyramid building on the hospital's east lawn. The a unique one for the developed by the St. Luke's ac- tivities staff, a seven-member committee of recreational and occupational therapists who work closely with the patients. Char Faris, recreation therapist and a member of the committee, said, "It's a very good experience for the patients In be successful, either by win- ning an event or by just comj peting. We initiated All-Star Olympics Day lo provide a good time for the patients as well as for Ihe staff." Patients participated in- dividually, with a partner or on a team, depending on the event. Judges for the day were members of the activities staff. Besides wearing shirts that proclaimed their allegiance in the staff, they blew whistles to begin each event, made final decisions in case of ties, and awarded ribbons for first, second, third and fourth places and honorable mention. No competitor went away empty handed. On hand lo assist were members of the hospital nurs- ing staff, student nurses, candy stripers, friends and family of participating patients. As tne accompanying pic- tures show, varied events were available. One of the most popular was the pie eating con- test. Chocolate and coconut cream 73-Year-Old Makes Runs To Summit of Pikes Peak MA.MTOU SPRINGS, Colo. (UP1) Edwin Paget says his funs arc keeping him on his toes. He doesn't dare sit down on his regular runs to the top of _ Pikes Peak or people think some- thing is wrong. The professor emeritus from N'orth Carolina State has become almost as legendary in the slate as the peak itself. Every summer Page! travels In Cnlnraiio from Raleigh to race to the top of the state's most famous mountain. lie runs to the top every other day sometimes doing it twice in a single day in order lo slay alert and active. He first began Ihe mountain chmli in I'll'i. but it has only hi-en the past Iti years that he has made a summer hobby of it. He now has logged more than trips Pagel's wife is content to slay at home in Raleigh while he runs, "I'm beginning to get mute a public up said Pa- gel, who admits only lo being in Ihe vicinity of "When 1 gel lo Ihe top, Ihey rush up and ask mi.' questions or ask if they can have my iiulograph." That's one reason, lie said, why lie never races lo Ihe peak wilh company, lie al- ways travels alone. "I! would bo an awful let- down to those people up there." he said. "A lot of them think I'm the only nne who can do it in that length of time. If I came up there with somebody else, it would he a letdown to them." Pagcl. whose allernate routes to the top range in dist- ance from !l miles lo Kl miles in length, says lour guides and other workers at the top of the peak, which is accessi- ble by road, often tell tourists about him. "One day I sal on a rock and a man told me it was the first lime he had ever seen me sit down. Since that lime, I haven't dared to sit down when someone was watching me. I have to keep standing." Page! believes a person should run at least 111 miles a day and then increase that distance gradually as he grows older Cnder such a program, he said, a person will reach full manhood at about K5 years of age. Pagel id Ihe first time he climbei! me peak, it took him 7 hours, T> minutes. His best lime has been .'I hours and I minute, which he admits is ahoul a half hour off Ihe lop recorded time for any- one running to Ihe peak, lie (limbed Ihe peak four limes in one day in 11162, a feat ac- pies were the delight (and perhaps later Ihe discomfort) of eight patients and staff members who took part. The youngest eater, a boy, 13. con- sumed his portion in a record five minutes and carried away the first place ribbon. He finished off his day with several pieces of watermelon. The enthusiastic chatter and active participation seemed to indicate that the day was a huge success. Many patients requested that the program be continued and so the All-Star Olympics Day just might become an annual event at St. Luke's. Ml. Mercy officials have named six new faculty members who will begin their duties this fall. They are Dr. Thomas Nickels and Robert Ha.xton. business administration; Sis- ter Roseline Kos, elementary education; Dr. Robert Beseria. psychology, and Henry Luba, speech and drama, all full- time. Richard Hoffman, vocal music, will teach part-time. Dr. Nickels holds degrees from DePaul university and Purdue university and has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois. He has taught economics at Eastern Illinois university for the last six years. Haxton earned a master's in business administration from Ihe University of Northern Iowa. He has taught business administration at Hanover college in Indiana and at Palmer Junior college. Sister Roseline has degrees from St. John college in Ohio and St. Mary college in Kansas. She has held several elementary school positions as teacher and principal. She has taught in summer sessions at Ml. Mercy for three years. Dr. Beseda has degrees from Ohio university and East Texas State. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin. He has taught at Milton college for four years. He has also worked for Wis- consin's Counseling center. Luba has two degrees in theater arts from the Univers- ity of Pittsburgh. He taught Pick up the telephone and j call lo place a want I Four Coe Seniors Are Named to Honorary Four Coe college seniors have been elected to member- ship in Phi Kappa Phi nation- al scholastic honor society. Induction was held Friday. Those elected were; Rose Marie Baleja. Chicago; Claudia Denise Davis. First avenue SE; Barbara Ann Dolan, Rutherford. X..I., and Kathleen Thompson. Wilton, Conn. high school speech and debate for several years and has act- ed in a variety of theatrical productions. Hoffman has an MA degree from the University of Iowa- Director of vocal music at Washington high school last school year, he has conducted several choral groups includ- ing the Old Gold Singers. He has published his own choral compositions. Disease Besets U. S. Wild Ducks WASHINGTON (AP) Harassed for many a long year by dried up breeding areas, by hunters and by the march of civilization general- ly. American wild ducks now face a new haxard: DVE. That's an acronym for the disease called duck virus en- teritis or duck plague. Present among domestic fowl in Eu- rope for about 30 years, it was first reported on farms in this country six years ago. Then in the winter of 1972-1973 it killed wild ducks and geese at the Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge in South Da- kota. Biologists fear that the vi- rus, known to be present now in some domestic flocks and probably in wild flocks, may spread. Stricken birds die within a week after being seized first with lethargy' and then with convulsions. The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is marshaling its laboratories, scientists and managers to try and deal with the threat. German Geographer First Used America America was named for Amerigo Vespucci an Italian reputed to have made four voyages to the New World German ge- ographer Martin Waidsee- muller first used the term "America" designating the New World in honor of the explorer, on a map in book published in 1507. complished over a 19-hour pe- riod. A native of Kansas City. Page! spent most of his child- hood in Chicago and later at- tended Northwestern universi- ty. He said he intended to run j .In the peak Wi limes this j summer. When lie reaches K5. j he plans to climb Ihe mono- tain five times in one day to celebrate his birthday. I "I think a man might run and reach his peak at 85 or later." he said. "The only way I can prove it is by trying to climb five limes and then that summer climb it more than I ever have before." JOIN HISTORY HAVE YOUR OWN WHITE HOUSE TAPE "WITH ERASURES" 6-fl lope with IB' of no Not only humcioui bul utifu nd guaionteod 10 woik A (ol rOnr i itgm1 Come in 01 mail today A WHITE HOUSE TAPE Once Regency South- is sold out, you'll have to settle for less. And pay more. Condominium residences from to OPEN TODAY, 1 TO 5 p.m. at 100 Thompson Drive S.E., Cedar Rapids You've Asked About For Appointment Call: 366-0300 or 383-4751 Built and Developed by Bjornsen Investment Corporation Social Security Officials Answer I'm 67, but I've always worked and I have never received social security retirement pavments. I've heard that I can get credit lo- all the months pas; 65 that I work and. don't get benefits. And I also heard thai this credit will increase my monthly payments when I start getting them. Must I keep a record of those months? No. you don't have tn keep any records. When you start setting monthly payments, the added amount you'll get because you delayed retirement past 65 will be figured au- tomatically and included in your cheeks. I'll soon be looking for my first job. I've never gotten a social security card and someone told me I'll need one. Should I get one now or should I wait until I'm hired for a job? You should apply for your social security number at least several weeks before you'll need it so it's a good idea to apply now. Applications for social security numbers from people who don't remember having had one are screened against the cen- tral files in Baltimore to make sure one person doesn't get more than nne number. Screening takes time. To get information about applying [or a number, call, write, or visit anv social security office. The Cedar Rapids Social Security office is located in room 300, SGA building, .122 Second street SE. Telephone number is: 366-2411, extension 431. Your Interior Decorators Francis and Joyce are here to help. FRANCIS JOYCE Francis Von Voltenburg and Joyce Sievers have the background and knowledge to help you with your every decorating need. Whether you're decorating old home or new, or working from a blueprint, we think you'll like the suggestions and help Francis and Joyce can offer. Come in or call; a decorator will visit your home at your convenience. Now in our 50th year. OF MARION 377-1591 Open Monday and Thursday Evening!   

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