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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 10, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 10, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                10 The OJar Rapids Gazette: Sat., Aug. 19. 1974 Ray: Ford Brings Needed 'Stability' to Presidency SIOUX CITY U'PIi- Pledging support fur new President Gerald Ford. Robert D. Ray said here Fri- day he believes Americans u'ill "rally around-" ihe new chief ixi-viiU'n and liu n.iiii.ii will begin tu mou- forward again. Ray said Furd made a dramatic appeal" in Ins initial speech as President in get the nation moving asiam and pui in the past Kay said Ford brings [he "s'.abili- ly" needed now in the pre.-i- dencv. Schmidhauser Urges Go Ahead On Impeachment CITY (API A polil leal scientist and former Iowa congressman belie; es to impeach President Kii-hard Nixon should continue. though he resigned. "The question of resigna tion and the suggestions of amnesty that have been made." said former Rep. John Schmidhauser "often are very, very inap- propate." Schmidhaiisi'r. who teaches al Ihe University of Southern California, believes "the full thrust of our constitutional re- sponsibilities" are upon the nation. The political specialist was in iowa City Thursday In join a symposium on the Herbert Hoover presidency. At the Hoover birthplace and Pres- idential Library in nearby West Branch, a celebration is underway to note the late chief executive's lllllth birth- day. The threat of impeachment hung for a time over Hoover. A strong Hoover critic. Rep. Thomas McFAdden in December, 1922, moved to impeach Hoover. The impeachment move assailed Hoover's foreign and domestic policies. but McFadden's effort was tabled on a 361-8 vote. Schmidhauser said that applying America's laws "with equal justice and equal severity" is called for "to res- tore public confidence and to assure an adequate division of power between the legislative and executive branches." For those reasons. "It would be hoped that the power to impeach would be carried said Schmidhauser as Nixon's resignation state- ment was being prepared. Refusing to "personalize" Nixon by name, Schmidhauser said that "Any president that has committed transgressions that have been openly ac- knowledged has reached a stage in which, in accordance with the views of the founding fathers, the full impact of the impeachment process should be carried through." Schmidhauser, who former- ly taught at the University of Iowa here, said there is a pre- cedent "for carrying through impeachment after a resigna- tion." He it occured "in Ihe case of one federal judge who attempted to resign to avoid the impact of impeach- ment. "The House and Senate carried lhat through in any case." he recalled. Services Held for Steven Hills CENTRAL services were held Saturday for Steven (Doug) Hills. 22. who died Thursday in a Cedar Rapids hospital. Born Nov. 21. 1951, in Cedar Rapids, he was an Army vet- eran and a member of Ihe Peace Lutheran church. He is survived by his par- ents. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hills, jr.. Central City, a brother; Edward, Cedar Rap- ids: a sister; Kelly of Central City; and a grandfather. Floyd Myers, Rowley. Services were held in Ryan at Ihe Peace Lutheran church, conducted by Rev. Richard Hamper Burial took place at Ml. Clark cemetery in Central City. The governor was here to address the annual convention of the Iowa Federation of l.abor He watched Ford speak on television after speaking to the unionists. In an interview. Hay said. "1 I think Ford sets (he tempo for what the country wants and needs right is sta- bility in the government and Mime confidence on Ihe part of i people in their leaders 1 think j Jerry Ford bus impeccable m- li'gnty The governor said he bad "not been approached" by Repub- lican leaders regarding thr possibility of becoming vice president "1 don't expect ;iny- Ihiim like ihui i.i happen." "knowledge and truthfulness that the people hau1 Ihe right lo evpoct." Ray added. "1 think the peo- ple of this country will rally around the new President now to see that we do move for- ward." Debra, a nine-day-old cross between a zebra and a donkey (left) stands with its mother the donkey at the African Lion Safari and Game Farm in Rockton, Ont. Although ilmay be called Z-Donk or Zonkey, G.D. Dailley, owner of the farm would rather it be called Debra is the first recorded female of this cross breeding and has generated interest at nearby Guelph university. Collection Centers on Dolls, Lindy By Rob Considine GREENWICH. Conn. What have Charles Lindbergh and dolls in common" Easy. They compose the remarka- ble collection of Samuel F. Pryor. Yale-man, ex-boxer, ex-marine, ex-vice-president of Pan American World Airways, and extraordinary friend and counselor to two renowned fellow septuagenarians. Gene Tunney and the reclusive hero the whole world once called "The Lone Eagle." I'ryor's collection of (lolls and Lindherghiana is con- tained in a restored burn that was around and healthy when George Washington was President and living in his nn- bugged executive mansion. There is nothing like it in the world. Thc dolls are from al- most every country in the world. The Lindbergh Corner, like the Poets' in Westminster Abbey, is small but select; let- ters, gifts (mostly the flying suits he and his wife wore in the single-engined Lockheed seaplane in which Indian Artifacts From 2600 B.C. Found By Rick Van Sanl UTOPIA. Ohio (L'Pl) An archaeological dig along the Ohio river is shedding light on a band of Indians who thrived on Ibis lush, roiling coun- tryside in 2600 B.C. "A lot of the local people ask me if we're finding any arrowheads." said Annie Seel. 21. a member of Ihe archaeological team from the University of Cincinnati. "1 tell them we find spearheads, but not arrowheads. They hadn't been invented yel." Kent Vickcry. the assistant professor heading the, dig. says the Indians also predated agriculture and pottery, "Fat and Happy" "But they were very re- sourceful and probably fat and happy." he said. Vickery and 15 graduate and undergraduate students have been digging 40 miles southeast of Cincinnati, between Ihe tiny Ohio towns of Utopia and Chilo. since the middle of June. Atop a short, winding trail alongside a thriving tobacco field just hidden from view of U.S. highway Ihe archaeologists carefully dug seven square holes, each one 6 feel wide and several feet deep. Then the long-handled spades were pul away and out came such dirt-removing tools as liny mortar trowels, air bellows and even tweezers. Burial Position Among the hundreds of his- lorically revealing objects found were the remains of a young Indian who was buried with his legs folded al the kneecap and pushed back against his chest. From thc artifacts found so I'ar. here's what Yickery cat1 tell about ihe residents of long ago: This was probably a hunting and fishing base camp used by about Hill In- dians. While they weren't ad- vanced enough lo invent Ibe bow and arrow, they did con- coct a rock weight to attach to Iheir spears to give them more distance and impact upon hil- ling animals, mainly deer. Although they didn't know how In plant crops, they ate many natural foods. Frag- ments of walnuts, hickory nuts and butternuts burned and carbonized, and thereby ac- curately dateable to B.C. have been found. Carbonized sections nf plants alsi> were dug up. Rites Are Monday For B.H. Fulton SPRINGVILLE-Bruce H. Fulton. 70, a resident of Springville for 18 years, died Thursday in a Cedar Rapids hospital. Born July 15, 1904, in Rubio. he was married March 18. 1928. tn Alma Taylor who died in 1959. On July 29, 1959. in Cedar Rapids, he was married to Mabel Hoover Banke. He was employed by the Mil- waukee railroad over 50 years, retiring in 1969 as a conduc- tor. He was a member of the Methodist church and Broth- erhood of Railway Trainmen. Surviving in addition to his wife are two sons. Charles an Harold Fulton, Honolulu. Hawaii: a daughter, Mrs. Joe Turkal, Solon; two stepsons. Henry Banke. Cedar Rapids, and Larry Banke. Camarillo. Calif.: nine grandchildren, one great-grandchild, two broth- ers, Lawrence Fulton. Mon- licello. and Earl Fulton. Cedar Rapids, and a sinter. Mrs. Louis Bemer, Covington. Services: Monday at at Murdoch chapel in Marion. Burial: Cedar Memorial cemc- ery. Cedar Rapids. Friends may call al the chapel after 9 Sundav. they flew ".North to the Orient." which was the first U. S -Japanese air link. Language" "There's never been a cul- ture without a doll." Pryor. who still looks like he could go ten rounds, told a group of us making the tour. "Dolls are a marvelous common language, a kind of super-Esperanto. I've shown some of these over most of the world and Ihe reaction has always been the same delight, and not only just among Ihe children. The appreciation of a beautiful doll isn't confined to any age group, or racial. Here's a case filled with Jewish and Arab dolls, all happy." Pryor and his ineffably hos- pitable wife, Mary-Tay. main- tain a special staff to do the dolls' laundry, dust or wash their beautiful faces, and keep the springs in the animated ones from rusting. The National Geographic Society. Smithsonian institu- tion and several olher or- ganizations would be happy to take Pryor's incredible collec- tion off his hands. Price would hardly matter to any of the bidders. But Sam wants to keep his treasure near him, and. of course, would not give up his Lindbergh collection for any sum. He seems to know every doll by name, and certainly by na- tionality. Sam is as Republican as. say. his friend Sen. Gold- water. But he'd like to show the collection one of these years in the Soviet Union. Doll Diplomacy "Imagine what a joy it would be for those Russian children to see the native costumes of the kids of oilier he asked our group. "Other- wise, they'll never know." There was instant agreement that it would do at least as much good as Kissinger's diplomacy. Kings, queens, princes and the future Empress of Japan have contributed to Sam's collection. A desperate mid- night search in Tokyo un- covered a tiny doll in a kimono which completed the minia- turized dolls-of-the-world he was scheduled to show to the Japanese royal family the next morning. "It was a "liff-hangor." Sam recalled, pointing to a gracious note of thanks from the wife of Crown Prince Akihito. Some of thc animated dolls do the damndest things imaginable, under Sam's magic touch (and well-oiled "Fabrics and Sewing" fi A "SPECIAL INTEREST" Section In The Cedar Rapids Gazette Wednesday, August 14 Of interest to all who fashion their own clothes or do Knitting Needlepoint Crewel Upholstering Draperies etc. A complete do-it-yourself guide you'll want to SAVE for the long winter evenings ahead. i v FOOD STORES SUPER SPECIALS LAND O'LAKES JUG MILK M 9 Swift's Premium SLICED BOLOGNA 69 806-34IH. Street S.E. 225 Edgewood Rd. N.W. 1944.42nd Street N.E. They play the uolin. lyres, blow horns, smoke water-pipes, fix their hair and look at the finished result by lifting tiny mirrors, and thumb Iheir noses at the French. (This is a Haitian doll, and Sam apologized in his courtly manner to the young girls on our tour in advance of winding him into action, and also explained to them how badly Ihe French treated that colony.) There are doll-like figures that gulp pennies, gadgets that taught children of a century and more ago how to save. One exception is a fat bronze figure that refused to accept the penny Sam placed on his hand. Tammany Belly "A Tammany politician, you can recognize him from his belly." slimline Sam said. Then he put a nickel on the figure's hand and the "Tam- many politician" immediately dumped it into its satchel. "Same as Sam pronounced. Looks like a bad year for the Dems. There are much more complicated doll arrange- ments, Sam explained one of them to Maureen O'Connell and the other little girls as well as to the senior citizens. It's a kitchen scene, circa 1830 or thereabouts. There had been a great scandal in France about the substitution of a cat for rabbit in certain popular dishes. It seems that rabbits were undergoing a planned parenthood crusade and were in short supply, hence the use of cats in the stew. The chef doll, cooking up a storm stew, while drinking heavily from a bottle of red w-ine. turns his head and angrily hut soundlessly deiues to his nag- ging wife that he has used a cat rather than a rabbit. At the height of their animated ar- gument, the lid on a pot on the side of the stove opens, and a cat's head looks out. Things like that Anne Morrow Lindbergh called her friends, the Pryors. while we were there to tell them that the general, as Sam refers to her immortal hus- band respectfully, had had two good nights in the hospital. One of Iheir sons had been out of Ihe country had flown home to see him. and that had cheered him. Ray Appoints Eastern lowans To State Boards DKS M01NKS (I I'll- Hubert I) Ray Friday an- nounced Ihe appointments of lit lowans In fmir -.tali' boards and agencies The gouTiior appointed live persons to the board oi mers (or bearing aid dealers. three to the Governors Task Force on ihe life support of i dependent adults, one to the j Iowa F.ducational Radio and 1 facility board and one to the Land Rehabilitation advisory board. Appointed to the board of ex- aminers for heariou aid deal- ers were Charles K. Cham- berlain, jr.. of Clear Lake, .lack L. Jennings of Sioux Cit- y. Phyllis Larson of Daven- port, and Margaret Haehr of Spencer an Clifford Welchcr of Greenfield. The board was created by the 1974 leu'lslature to license hearing aid dealers anil conduct the license examina- tions. The three persons appointed to the (ask force on life sup- port of dependent adults were Bill Howard of Ankeny. Jerry Starkweather and Sen. Lucas IVKoster The task force makes recommendations on ways to improve custodial care facilities in the state. William B. Quarton. of Cedar Rapids, was appointed to a three-year term on the Educa- tional Radio and Television facility board. The hoard over- seas development os educa- tional radio and television facilities, including the Iowa Educational Broadcasting Net- work. Ray appointed H. dene Hartel of Des Moines to the Land Rehabilitation advisory board, which advises the department of soil conservation on meth- ods to rehabilitate land which has been surface mined. Television Listings 9--KC1G tV, Rop'di 2 -WMT W. CeJiu Rupirli 7-KWWl IV, Wulerloo 3-KTVO. Ottumwo 4 -WH8F IV, Sod, Mo'.d 6- WOC IV. Saturday Night 8--WKM, la Gone 10-KROC-TV, I2--KIIN FV, TV, Det Moir-ei 40- KDUB, Oubuque Cedar Rapids Chaplain Gives Sunday Sermon The Rev. David Quiring, associate chaplain at St. Luke's hospital in Cedar Rap- ids, will speak Sunday at the First Baptist church worship service at The Rev. Mr. Quiring re- ceived his theological training at the Berelely Baptist divini- ty school and has served as- sociate pastorates in Yakima, Wash., and Des Moincs. He- has been associate chaplain at Youngsters of All Ages Enjoy Hoover Chautauqua Children clutching Fopsi- cles and hot dogs ran across the rolling park grounds of the Herbert Hoover National His- toric Site Wednesday after- noon to the big tent where a program was !o be held espe- cially for them. After everyone was settled, either on folding chairs or sit- ting Indian-style at the foot of the stage, the show of drama, music and dance captured attention immediately as Popsicles dripped unheeded into the grass. "Youngsters" of all ages laughed and clapped wilh the performers, themselves for the most part children, who presented a varied program for the nearly 1.000 In attend- ence. Children's Chautaquas were an integral part of the cultural programs which flourished under a tent in the 1920's, and the organizers of this week's recreated Chautauqua program offered children similar opportunities to have fun and be exposed to art forms al the same time. Favorite Tales There were "once upon a time" stories about cats and elephants told by the Tell Me- a-Story lady Lnuanne New- some, Iowa City. This Mother (loose-dressed grandmotherly appearing woman dramatically told two avorite tales by Rud.yard Kip- ing and Wanda liag. Then came the Davenport Children's Theater, sponsored by the Davenport Park Board for 22 years, which put on a rock musical version of Ae- sops's tales, recreated as "Aesop's A Few Danced With painted-on whiskers or clown-paint faces, the child- ren's group "jazzed up" the traditional Aesop and got the audience laughing, clapping, and a few. dancing along with the cast. After one aborted attempt, the hot air balloon grew from a flat nylon bag into an 80 foot high aircraft which drifted off the ground and away over the audience's heads. And then it was hack to the food tents for another round of Popsicles and hot dogs, and races back to cars with the kids far and away ouldistanc- ing their elders. the hospital for Ihe lasl four years. Final Summer Adult Seminar on Sunday Final session in the adult summer seminar being held at the First United Methodist church is set for Sunday at 8: :ill a.m. Dr. Donald Typer. of Ml. Vernon, will conclude the discussion on "Amnesty, The Christian The seminar included 10 sessions on topics nf current interest. Going Out of Business! The Folks and Uncle Leonard, Marion. Selling out entire stock all week; auction Sat. Aug. 17th. N .nee: All advertisements of this type (Marion Locals) must be In The Gazette Classified Office by A.M. day of publication (11 A.M. Sat. for Sunday. Dial 398-8430 or 398-8234. Adv. Attend Jerry Monn, 933 Eighth avenue, and Mr. and Mrs. Michael See- man, of Cedar Rapids, were in Mendota, 111., Friday to attend funeral services for Mrs. Ev- elyn Gardner. Mrs. Gardner was Mrs. Seeman's grand- mother. For the Finest in Paints SPECIAL- OF- THE-WEEK! Is Your Home Safe? You can make sure wilh home- owners insurance from your lo- cal Independent 'nsurance Agent. He has a policy that protects you from theft.' fire, lightning, wind, hail, riols, vandalism, and many other kinds ol loss. Call or drop in on your local aRen today. Look lor this emblem. WITWER INSURANCE 701 MNB Phone 362-3030 One Hour" CLEANERS Coupons Must Be Presented With Incoming Orders Sweaters Trousers 1 5 CU.FT. FROST-FREE Expires August 16 2 Piece Suits 2 Piece Dresses O'Coats Furs, Leathers, PteaH, Extra. No Limit Expert Alterations, Mending Re-weaving 2 LOCATIONS HOURS: Open 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily Marion 708 7th HOURS. Mon. thru Fri, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sal, 8 a.m. to 6 I Hour Service Daily Til 3 p.m. JndAv.. SE 364-0213   

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