Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 8, 1974 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 8, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- Occasional rain tonight and Friday, ixm lo- night. mid 60s. Highs Friday, tow 80s. VOU.'MK CKDAK RAPIDS. IOWA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8. 1974 CITY FINAL 15 CENTS ASSOn.ATF.D PRKSS, TIMES TV AT Resignation Statement Awaited; Ford Due To Be Sworn In Friday f r Gaypttc I.rasr.i Wires WASHINGTON Richard M. Nixon prepared to tell an ex- pectant naiion Thursday that hc would resign as president. Word that Ihe President had decided lo leave office rather -than undergo Ihe trauma of im- iied lo announce his resignation tlaig were understood to have Uieen deeply concerned about In thai statement, Rhodes said ihe potential impact of a pro- .mlj that it was his impression longed impeachment crisis on lhe President would make a de- (he nation's foreign affairs. "that will ,..ord.s offjce -c minds oi no lay political trip p.-achment came from in the White House and on .endured" nas.were called mto the White i However, an aide to Rhodes ru0m by Amid an intensifying flurry ;said ,ha, the original Gerald of resignation reports, Nixon congressman's in ;mel lor one hour and 10 min-1 formation on resignation was ules with Vice-president Ford correct. ;ident to come Over lor a pri- Kissingcr Role vale meeting." Another source who also: One of Ford's aides said later who would become the nation's' 'Mh president. j I Shortly after Ford left the Wan'c'" lhen announced that had "asked the vice-pres- would White House came an announce- jasked to remain the vice-president would I men! that the President would paid he believed Kissinger had.have no immediate comment on j address the nation on television been instrumental in persuad- lhe development, saying any .and radio at 8 p.m. CDT Thurs-1 ing Nixon lo resign. Kissinger would have to come first RICHARD NIXON Hour of Decision held a long late-night meeting Irom the White House Call Meetings with the President in the White; Nixon and wh Ford later summoned ,o the vice-presidency aHer "r to a SPiro Agnew resigned last Oc- 1 The secretary of state earlier jlobcr before pleading no con-j jtary of State Kissinger i midafternoon meeting. Several Ways to Avoid Prosecution of Nixon HUdUt'inoon meeting. ui Mme vat uei tuuer I Nixon calied congressional had PointedlJ' ignored to a federal income tax aders to Ihp While from newsmen who asked if he.evasion leaders to the White House for jan early evening meeting. Congressional sources said the President's resignation first in the 198-ysar history of the Republic would be ef- WASHINGTON i.AP) Pres- said he is "not prepared to dis-j Ford would necomenprcsidcnt ident Nixon faces possible it. inal prosecution should he re- sign or be removed from office, but several escape routes may be open to him. i Senator Congress or special Watergate Thursdiv couJd ac, .o immediately asffl cou ac, o House 'Nlxon flom cllmlnal president Ford if he succeeds to'signs the presidency. i The resolution would not have Victim of Crash On Motorcycle ___....._ jti iiit iiiiuc Steven D. Hills. 22, of 661 Fif- introduced a sense of j House East jteenth avcnue sw. died shortly p.m. and 5 p.m. CDT Friday. ,Vafter 8 a-m- Thursday at Mercy Brooke I R-Mass. i Thomas O'Neill said he under-j slood Ford would take the oa'h! of office from Chief Justice1 j Warren Burger in the White from newsmen who asked if he.evasion charge, met alone in: felt the President should Oval office. i aside. Both Kissinger and White Talks House staff chief Alexander! As "le President appeared to! -----------------------1 be putting the final pieces in i ii'ii iPlaue fnr resignation, his two nil IS IS sons-in-law- David Eisenhower and Edward Cox, were spotted making the rounds of the Execu- tive Office Building, next door to the White House. Wednesday. A source said they were say- iii n White House source said of injuries suffered would be at 5 p.m. Ford "Calm Asked how Ford has taken th .vhen he lost control of the mo- jtorcycle he was riding and I rammed against a fence. Hills suffered severe head in- said he believes all law enforce-lnews- Paul Miltich. the vice-1 juries, crushed ribs, a broken self of all office, but that is vi  Hie.iu. .'foregone conclusion. According to the Washington The death of Hills was the leaders told Nixon he r.esiuem out not congress the1 headquarters June 17. 1972. fj President would resign, anrij ...c me leaaers told W.xon he Monday he Admitted ordering ipardons for offens F jn Jsaid they were correct. He later ninth traffic fatality in Cedar had only about 15 votes against Ihe investigation halted for po-; s a statement denying that Rapids this year and the third conviction in the senate and and concealing 'Continued: Page 3, Col. S.i 'he had said the President of a motorcyclist. !perhaps only 10 votes in the' reasons and concealing the information from his law-, yers and the house committee. Some members of say Nixon, in effect, confessed to obstructing justice, a crime carrying a maximum penally of five vears in orison and a 0 fine.'Multiple'counts and related B> Tnm Fruehilns charges would inc-ease the po- tential penalties. ed "jProsecution, Nowlin Defense Rest; To Jury This Afternoon .house against impeachment. i There were unconfirmed j broadcast reports that Scott: oassed along lo Nixon a propos- al for a "sense of congress" res- jolution lo spare the Presidenl !any prosecution for should hc quil supervise" his top White House aides. Close Scrutiny Calling himself a "conserva- tive on fiscal matters, a moder- ate on domestic affairs and a liberal on foreign Ford said no U.S. combat troops ihould be sent to the Middle East; he would insist on full en- forcement of federal voting rights laws; keep the CIA under close scrutiny and control; and run for President in modest. Even when he became he would keep Henry Kissinger pable disposition, a solid base of party support and a certain j gray acceptability lo everyone. Run in '76? standards, morally, ethically and otherwise, by which most Americans live their lives." Average Man almost! Bul Ford promises to lead, so loo does he share the habits of the average man. It is improbable that Ameri- The Democrats, at first, found cans will find him moving from an additional reason to suppori. one large coastal estate to an- jhim: they didn't think it likely other, for his living tastes are Ford said as much him- vice-president, he. chose to re- las secretary of state.' One Harry former Nixon Dent, noted that "Ford the Republican party like a .swimming pool ielove." I yard. Ford is an orthodox Republi-; (Continued: Page 3. Col. 3.1 ichurch regularly :his adult life. throughout spcccliniaking averaged 200 appearances a year as house I MIUUIU nc tjun I 1.1 nn UMMUUUA He is an open man. often Th v e damage lnp throughout the trial is that ifi Scott said he expects Ihe "e is also a devout Epis-i holding forth wilh reporters its T 'arge fractures ;Servey was killed following a ation to be who has attended j several limes a day. And his its case Ihuisday morning Instantaneous struggle, premeditation on Now-1 If Nixon resigns, he would be calling any witnesses on Jin's pan may be ruled out vulnerable loan indictment. Presenting evidence in the palholngist's opinion.; Thus a verdir', of first d I If he were convicted in an im- murdcr (rial of instantaneous. murder should no, b peachment trial. Hc .The two defense attorneys hall ,n depth, which ario they argued might have oc- curred al lhc death scene. They asked Dr. Weland if the knife, wounds could have been murder (rial of George he would be 3I'of rural Keystone. Hc also told ol 31 puncture removed from office and s.mi- Thc case -scheduled lo m the chest, up lo an larly vulnerable because the ln lno two-man juryj'nch and Constitution slate? lhal "the w n S final party convicted shall neverlhe- afternoon. smal1 knife less be liable and subject to in- Regis Wcland. a (Ytiar riiclment. trial, judgment and pathologist, was the lraled cnpsl wali and "luo were caused by Some of these, hc said, pcne- jTerry Dennis Wholesale Price Rise Struck by Car; u c. A Dies fo Injuries Mosf August main in his same He said he would never au- home unpretentious ex-ithorizc anyone in his adminis- much-chcrishedltration to lie under oath and the back -only in the most extreme cases would 1 authorize even a temporary lie." Ford, who spent most of his boyhood in Grand Rapids, Mich., was horn with another name, Leslie King, on July M, 1913 in Omaha. punishment according to law." Deal with .laworski into Ihe or three" morning. Hr testified on Ihe sj- Thr, lopsy he performed on Michael a, To avoid that fate. Nixon Servcy March 13 eight flays could attempt to strike a deal after it is charged Servcy was'! s lllnR with .laworski. The President killed by Nowlin near Palisades- could offer lo resign in ex-Kepler stale park, change for Ihe prosecutor's promise nol to bring criminal Cause of Death charges. Rul Ihe deal would no, Describing Servcy as a "well- necessarily bind a grand jury developed, well-nourished young nls The prosecutor's office re- man." Dr. Weland speculated fuses to common! on Ihe possi-.lhe cause of death was a gun- previous wiln Si bihly of plea bargaining. woumlI to lhe hark of the ney Ceneral Saxbe said on which produced mulliplo i ne.sday he is no, aware of any] fractures. wilh m ongoing negoliations. Nixon .v The prosoculion has couloiul- chief attorney, James SI. one ol wilh one of two sawed-off shol- Nowlin's two court-appointed at- i-'uns witnesses have claimed lomeys from Iowa City allcmpt they saw in Nowlin's possession eri lo establish lhal Servc-y and Dr Weland said he mighi have IHMMI 111- I many" sholguu pellets and alvolvcd in a "siruggle" I.eforc ..Iplaslic power piston within Sfr-'lhcdrath. Ivey's brain He said Iheiv was of lln- flclcnsc coiilenliims Terry Dennis. 25. of W A S II 1 TON iAP His parents were divorced .when he was less Uian a year I old and his mother returned to jher parents in Grand Rapids, jwhere she later married Gerald jll. Ford. sr. He adopted tile hoy aral renamed him. II IK) lilt i i IIIII.> (M died blood in K struggle, wilh Nowlin he- icstified hind and as knife in nis hand. 'la-v on highway 94 just outside. The hand wountls. they ar- "le Rapids city limits. might have been caused. The driver of Ihe car. Charles four straight months of decline. Wholesale prices jumped 17 '1'hc Nixon administration had! Ford was center on Ihe Uni- percont las, month the labor lilltl or al lcasl of Michigan's 1932 and struck by a car Wodncs- illfi fnod Priccs lo ilK national champion football riepHilimni i.poil.d down _. thpn Thif works ran to a.staggering hy 1.4 percent on an annual rnle. end. Consumer prices are cur-1 Servey had six similar puncture' 'when the was'forced Richard of' I isl'l'lill- W''S ;ibovr' a wounds nn his right hand and hack into Servey's palm. ,side drive mlri Linn cnuntv several lac-orations and bruises "'eland answered thai h- -sheriff's deputies he was fmnparetl lie wholesale m: forehead and m-ck -presumed" this could nave bound when he slowed his ar a" nsc' ol Wils Hit in Head but he he observed a car the defense argument as an parked along the road will, n> "i outside probability." .flashers on. URUH-.s aio I Body Discovered Young said he was distracted Several wilnesse.s were ques- ,'he ('ar a Chicle which was back- six crni, wjih meat pacing it. Larger on-shadowing d per-. c I most valuable player of the iCnnlinued: Page 3, Oil. 6. i Today's Index lur- Chuckle Any boy who is anxious mow lht> lawn is loo young lo HUT irouhle for meat prices was an eu-n larger riM- .i .1 per- lionetl by prosecution was flir protTss.-d loot's Wednesday afternoon in an at i'nR drlVP Slnlck price in and leeds farmers must buy for1 temp, to' substantiate earliernpnnis- who -'.re usually their 1 ......J according to a i into higher prices fur CMI Ann, prices, u.sually stable at sumers. the- rcporl casi a pali lime nf year, also rose i iidn.slrial i-ommotlitie.s moved lo substantiate earlier; testimony and lo identify pre-' u viouslvHibmilled exhibits jshenffs report. Dennis Rlome, chiefi deputy in Ihe l.inn Donnis was taken lo Universi- ty hospitals in Iowa City, where over hopes for any slackening m i Continued: Page '2ftA, Col. fi. he accident. No charges were liled. inflation upward, although nol as .slccplyj Stiitr. I The biggest whrle.sali- jump as [arm prices Thc iiuluslria..... 'was in volatile farm prices. A'lncrrasi- was 27 pcrcenl, com [l> 4 pcrcenl rise in July ITUTM-I! pared lo 2 2 Ihi- month. Comics ...27 Daily Record 3 Deaths .1 F.dilorial B 28 Movifs 17 Society Spurts Stiitr. Television M Want Ads 3IKI5   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication