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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 3, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Itapids Gazette: Sat., August 3, 1974 Owners Upset Over Back Pay Demands No Headway During Brief Friday Talks Kuursioner IVte Italic were two- jears owners and'major stumbling blocks in ne- e patched up their differ- Thompson said the two .sides; and turned to playing were currently about mil-! football after in an in-''on apart, with the players j dispute asking for an additional ?40j Hictni-v million in comparison to the; HMo.y seems uuhkrlv to flf mmm pea ,Lself, with both cur- ,lle NFLpA js rently tradiii" rhanjes and tacking the man who stepped in counter-charts on why .settle the 1970 strike. How- have failed in the lias not been able strike by the Players As- to take any part in this year's sociation. negotiations. The players asso- Botlt the owners and the play-'nation has modified its de- ers association -held briefings I mands in this area up to thej Friday, and the testimony thatlpiint of including Rozelle in the' emerged showed why talks of disputes and to cessed Thursday for lack instead an outside arbi- any movement. I trator. Rill Curry of the Houston Oil-; Thompson described the own- ers, president of the associ-jcrs as "disillusioned, but reso- ation, said his group had made lute" in their determination to substantial changes in its bar-jkeep a united front, and I gaining demands, but that the Thompson said he did not see! owners "did not increase hope for optimisim when! offer by one cent during the talks resume Tuesday. past three days; they continued Curry said the 17 inodi- to try to bust this union." j fications made by the players John Thompson, executive di- included the concession that rector of the NFL Management Council, said in New York the players association had indeed made changes, but also had in- creased the number of their de- mands. "We had expected them to give a little. And they did give some, but they took in some areas said Thompson. "What we received Thursday we might have been able to see as an opening bid, but not for Rozelle could have the same rights as his counterparts in other sports to govern over what he called the "integrity of the game." "In other Curry con- tinued, "we have substantially reduced our position here and suggested impartial arbitration for day-to-day grievances while allowing the commissioner to concern 'himself with matters such as gambling and moral Jeffs Barber Zips No-Hitter Ity Steve AUspitdi NOKWAY The always a charm. That's whai Teilar JHHTSOII inaii.'.ansc'i a cuuule weeks back when they defeated We kiiev, the rotation third time i- uork "l't 'his way and you've gut play them one at at time." explained the veteran Jeff mentor. off with a single, but was erased Barber all season long and the fireballing senior didn't let his teammates down Fridav. C'mon Fellas, Don't Cross Over the amount of time we haveitorpitude." been i Thompson recalled that in the One of .the new demands own-! 1970 strike, 'some 21 veterans ers were most upset about was back payment to all strikers dating to the beginning of train- ing camp. reported to training camps dur- ing the labor troubles, which were at a confrontation stage [from two to three weeks. The money issue and There are currently over 300 J'ear's football schedule. Thompson termed a "direct at- veterans in on tack" on the office of Commis-! strike. Sparse Crowds At NFL Openers IFrancisco at San Diego. The defending Super Bowl cham- pion Miami more properly, a skeleton of the in Cincinnati to play the Bengals. Bills' owner Ralph C. Wilson took a hard line following the Bills' loss. He predicted that there will be "absolutely no break in the stalemate unless the players change their adding that if the owners give in to the players' freedom demands "it would mean the death of pro football as we know it." Asked if lie would go along with any changes in the own- ers' current position, Wilson said flatly: "Absolutely not. They wouldn't get my vote." He also said he was was op- posed to binding arbitration to settle the 34-day-old strike. Running back Skip Lyman, dropped by the New York Jets on their final cut last year, scored two touchdowas to give the Patriots their 21-16 victory over the Redskins. He scored on a seven-yard pass from the Rams a 24-21 victory over quarterback Neil Graff and ran the Cleveland Browns. The crowd was the smallest in the 29-year history of the Los Angeles Times Charity Game. Last year it drew And in Buffalo's 80.020-scat Rich Stadium, which was filled to the brim a year ago when the Bills played their first pre- season game, 30.119 fans turned out to watch the Green Bay Packers score a 16-13 viclory. By Bruce Lowitt Associated Press Sports Writer National Football League club owners got a boot in the gate and striking players re- ceived a bit of heavy blocking from the fans as the exhibition season kicked off before more empty seats than people. Friday night's three rookie and free-agent infested pre- season games drew fans, about the same number of en- thusiasts who packed any one stadium a year ago, when starters and other veterans were in full force on the fields.. In Washington, the New Eng- land Patriots beat the Redskins 21-16 before an announced crowd of paid, the smal- lest crowd ever to watch pro football in RFK it appeared that even fewer people than that were on hand in the 54.374-scat park. There were people in Los Angeles' 92.000-seat Coli- seum to see Bob Thomas, a World Football League reject, kick a 19-yard field goal wilh two seconds to play which gave Roy Jefferson, all-pro wide receiver from the Washington Redskins, shouted at a bus that carried Redskin rookies and some veterans to a pre-season game with the New England Patriots Friday night. As the bus crossed the picket lines, Jefferson and several other veterans shouted that fans would see "scab football" at the game. Elliott Likes New Slate By Gus Scbrader CHICAGO, 111. Iowa coach Bob Commings was too busy wondering if the Hawkcyes can find sombody to beat on this But the rest 'of the lowans at- tending Friday's Big Ten foot- ball kickoff luncheon were pleased about the schedules the conference has approved for 1975 and '76. "One of the most recent schedules the Big Ten office had run through their com- puter and mailed out for us to look over had us opening against Minnesota in 1975 and said athletic director Bump Elliott. "This was unthinkable for us. Gosh, our traditional rival is Minnesota. I was ready to fight against approving that. "This week, after the Big Ten athletic directors had turned down three or four earlier ones, we finally approved schedules forced all of the schools to start using the same rule the Big Ten has had for a number of years 30 players a year. "The Big Ten also has the red-shirt rule now. It may take about three more years for the impact to be felt completely, but soon we can be competitive with schools like those in the Big Eight that have been re- cruiting 45 new players a year." Michigan's Bo Schcmbeculer seemed to be the happiest coach at the luncheon, a great con- trast to the angry blast he un- leashed on the Big Ten athletic directors and commissioner Wayne Duke when Ohio State was picked for the Rose Bowl last November. Bo expressed great pleasure when George Hill, Ohio State defensive coach who represent- ed Woody, said Woody was re- had his heart attack, I sent him a note saying, "My old coach once advised me to get plenty of tinK' this season in baseball. But for Ihe J-llauks lo turn the trick lour times, that was even more charming. And they (lid just that Friday night as liruce Barber fired a no- hitter to propel Jeff into the "l iinil "'M' sub-state finals, 2-0. Stoecker added an insurance run in the sixth when he belted Jef er.son wi face Hur ing ton r a .ibO-foot home run over the Saturday' night at m an t -n" i centerlield lence. A p.m. contest tna w, I deter- mine a berth m the class AA f f state tourney. The J-Hawks have relied on or Lloyd Spiers Kennedy flub, it was the second straight year that the tourney trail hud ended wilh a no-hit- bsmg a curve and a i j fastball to baffle the Kennedy' .hitters, he twirled 'his third no-: Just weren't meeting the j hitter of the year. He has H's that intoned jbeen the winning pitcher in S four Jeff wins over the Cougars. we've been hitting the j but tonight Barber must "Its beamed Jeff have had something we couldn't coach Vern Bredesen after the pick Ws certain, not a win, "but Bruce certainly had s( f (0 d th us worried m the last inning." iCougarboss He was referring to a dramatic Barber, now 14-5, hiked his season strikeout total to 210, equalling a Jefferson school record. He allowed just one run- ner to second base before he pitched himself into the seventh- opposing pitcher Dick Church to inning jam. j ground out and preserve the; Kennedy closed out the year Condon dead- win_ jeffs 23rd against 11 set-i with a 27-9 record. j seventh inning when Barber j walked the bases full, including a hit batsman, with nobody out. He then struck out Rocky Dales and Jeff Novak and got panned, "and apparently he did." backs. Burlington was rated among Commings and Corso, howev-lthe State's top five teams all for preventing heart attacks.' jcr_ thc bjggcst but that doesn't bother Sure, misery loves company. Notre Dame recently lost six standout sophomore players who were suspended from school for at least a year be- cause a young woman said they had raped her in a dormitory. About the same, time two In- diana players were charged by from the audience with their Bredesen, even though he will humor. Maybe it should be not have Barber to throw7, pointed out their schools tied for stoecker wil, pitch the Big Ten basement last year and he's been doing a fine job. a "ecu uuuig a nue juu. Jelferson .....................100001 with 0-8 records, as they didn't________________________; E_j. Novak, chMle. 4. police after a hard-drug raid coacnes the Hoosier campus. "I've always said I wished we had a football team like said Indiana publi- cist Tom Miller with a wry smile "and I guess now my wish has come true." We told Indiana Coach Lee Corso we noticed he had lured meet. "We think we can turn Iowa program said j Commings the only new head in the league. "Of course, are alike. They always think they can turn a thej Norway Faces LaPorte BOONE (AP) Pairings wei announced Saturday by C.R. Kennedy tot C.R. Jeff (2) ab h rbi ab h rbl Cnurch.p .....3 0 0 Gaskill.c 1 1 0 M.Novak.lf ..200 Moycr.rf .....2 0 0 Simmons, ss .3 0 OJacobsen.ss ..300 .300 Stoeckenlb 3 1 1 2 0 0 .200 DeSousa.or .000 Kohl, If .....3 0 0 2 0 0 ...3 0 0 If 0 0 0 Trosky.Sb ....2 0 0 ......3 o o Barber.p -.0 o o ..200 Smith.ph .....1 0 0 Totals ....20 0 0 Totals .....20 2 1 Kennedy .....................COO 000 Jefferson .....................100 001 _ _ ______ Ken- i nedy M. Novak. 1 IP H R ER BB SO Church .......6 2 2 1 4 3 Barber (W) .........7 0 0 0 6 10 i Barber program around even if thej Iowa Highs School Athletic As- s were! k the1 record was 0-11 or 0-50 the year! I sociation for the Class A sub-: before .they arrived. "I don't have any long-range State Berth {state games in the summer; NORWAY-Norways baseball state high school boys baseball'team rebounded from an early nlan nt inwa T inc plan at lowRight now I jus tournament. deficit to whale Twin Cedars The state meet begins Mem-! 20-2 in a Class A substate covering swiftly from the heart j a female assistant coach, ibut j attack that hospitalized him injwondered if he shouldn't have; June. j hired a narc instead. (Continued: Page 10. Col. 1) j day at Memorial Park in Boone. {final Friday night. At (i p.m., Corning meets; After surrendering two first- C J. L j Granville-Spalding, followed at 8; inning runs. Norway hurling ace J POTTS by a game between Boddicker settled down 1 i Porte City and Norway. and pitched shutout ball the rest for 1975-76 that have Iowa open- "Did you read what Woody ing against Illinois." Bump also agreed, with some relief, that Iowa drops Michigan and picks up Indiana for those two years. So in 1975 Iowa will open with Illinois at Iowa City, then face Syracuse, Penn State and Southern California in non- conference play before playing seven more Big Ten foes. "We will close against Michi- gan State every year for the Bump said. "This is because for so many years we played Notre Dame in our final game. The other schools arc paired off against, long-time rivals Michigan against Ohio Stale, Purdue against Indiana, Minnesota in from the three-yard line. against Wisconsin and Illinois Joe Theistnann, a former Ca-iagainst Northwestern." nadian Football League passed for the Redskins' onlyj All of. the. Big. Ten head' said at his first press confer- ence the other laughed Bo. "Someone asked him if he could coach this fall, and he replied: 'Coaching football is all I can do the only sport I know. I can't play tennis, and I don't believe I have the right temperament for Schcmbechlcr had a heart at- tack before the 1970 Rose Bowl game against Southern Cal At that time I had a wonderful let- "No, I can't help what kind of, people were recruited before I came to Indiana." lamented, Corso. Later he said he had def-; i of the way for a two-hitter. Bod- 10 L- D T U T 6 S Waqaman's 32 Wins aided his cause wilh CL f if ci double and home run to garner ,1 Stle] CL f if ci Shrmer Golf Sf ag j f using drugs. He made it :four RBIs. Pat Valant ripped a three-run! u Dale fired a Doug Himmelsbach and Kevin hole 32 to win the trophy in the Miller each added three runs El Kahir Drum and Bugle Corps batted in for the winners, with 16th annual golf stag Friday at Himmelsbach getting a pair of double and "iivT l- H ff to Power Cedar Rapid; the two men will DC kicked ott dub t0 a over iut" bui1 OIL16 gcumj they are found guilty Photo in the city cham thc Hillcrcst coul'sc in Mount singles and Miller a what action the university takes; pionship o[ Kids two triples, against them. 5a3enaii Fridav. I Tlle championship flight Norway's summer record is baseball Friday. Randy Trachta had two with a 32. Clos- Dave. Chicago. Tri- and Ed 7Jthoff struck flut nj est to the pin was Frank Jeker- bune sports columnist, was the luncheon emcee !coaches escaped comments. He took note of the winners, while Mark to lhl' nnt1 Frank FCW of i Lukes had two hits for Kilborn Jf-kei-le while Walt Heaton was _____ _____ d his closest lo the eighth pm. Waga- Boddicker and wain. I man had the longest drive on i now 27-3, while its overall mark stands at 39-5. Twin Cedars .200 000- 111 .033 [1D3X-20 1  LUdiup QIJUUS L.JUU .haTta had a to a fur.d chairman, recommended: "Bob Commings said plenty of exercise for heart pa-; wanted to get into Ilig Ten ticnts. Well, when I heard he; coaching in the worst way 1st Bleakly 35. Long 3V; .U; D. Kama! 4fl; Ulricfi 52. f- ALWAYS 1 S Kinseth MIDWKST LEAGUE North W It Texas (Bibby 14-12) at Chicago (Kaat i -aitimore' (Grimslev 12-8) at Detroit'' touchdown when he hit Tim Paulus with a 24-yard pass. Mark Moselcy kicked field goals of 20, -19 and 47 yards for Washington. Thomas, a soccer-style kicker from Notre Dame was signed and cut Ibis summer by Jack- players a year. coaches except convalescent Woody Hayes spoke at the huge' luncheon in thc Palmer House. and most of them got around to: saying how much they apprcci. By Mcvc Allsp-ich ate the new RCAA rule limiting Bruce Kmseth of Dreorah was a school lo recruiting 30 Aoblelon Waterloo ;Wis. Rapids Dubuquo 16 Cedar Rapids U South Decatur Danville 19 Clinton 'Kurth of Tama captured the'Quad ciiies Wins AAU Mat Title Pet. GEJIILolich p .615 Calilornia r Unlike Washington, which jsonville of (he WFL. had about 70 pickets en hand. Ranis' owner Carroll Rosen- the Los Angeles and Buffalo games were not picketed. The Chicago Bears and St. bloom called it "sad and dis- tressing when we play a game -We've been fighting equal said Johnny Pont, starting his second season al Northwestern after eight, years heavyweight title. Jay Struve of Henton Communily was third all National! Jenkins of C.R. Jeff' nvslling tour-iwas second at heavyweight. FREESTYLE j Snook. Grand Rapids, 1 Kinselh. who will be a ,iocminq, Mk, an age group w ndnv at oc. Louis Cardinals played an bit ion game loday at Late-reporting third-year III. Tonight, ir.sjquarlerback Jerry Taggc, and Champaign. the New York Jels for charity and il loses mon- Indiana IlK1: NCAA of Bcltcndorf finished j second al lhat weight and .Dick of O.K. Jeff was fourth, j Highlighting Ihc freestyle Sieve Odom each scored a touchdown in firoen liav's victory over llu at New Orleans, the New York Iowa Man. Wins 10-11 Title 4-3 Friday's Games Wis. Rapids 5, Burlington I Applet on 11, Decalur 6 p.invillc at Cedar Rapids, 2 ppci Clinton .1! Quad Cities, ppd, rai Waterloo a! Dubuque ppci, rain Saturdays Games Aopicton at Wis. Rspids Waterloo at Cedar Rapids, Dobuqui? 
                            

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