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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 2, 1974 - Page 7

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 2, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                'Well-Fed Soldier Is a Good Soldier .N annual li ainnn' "i Ui.ma-.'e'lH ill In he shuffle, and inral orders annual IIUIIIIIK' exercise ,1 point liakalai A an average meal 'i! figures can be lolills "I ...............M Inou (unirullrr responsible of -1 -Hill meals three liln-s Kuwne Hakalar ulu, ,s a, Mle Uooduanl I kl" 'I- levels for u-......s M! Drought Concerns Borlaug MINXUAI'lll.lS. Mum lAI'i Dr. F Horlaiu: a Xobel inning I.....I j pert, said llns week lie was "hornlied" al the exleul ill'oliglii condiiions in Hie Unit cd States Horlaiig returned lasl week after nearly six moiiihs in Asia and Africa, working on I.....I proiei is w ilh ijexeloping lla- tiiins While his information is in- complete. Horlaiig said. doesn't look promising He said lie had unconfirmed reports ol substantial winter ill the Russian winter w heal crop a for could iiffeel world prices. Critical of Inflation Borlaug spoke al the Mid- west Cioveroors' conference. Humphrey. and others in a discussion of world food problems. Borlaug criticixcd the federal government for dealing inadequately with inflation. "It seems lo me we've become so obsessed wild Watergate thai we play while inflation is ruining the world." he said. Horlaiig won the Xobel Peace prize in 1971) for developing a high-yield strain of wheat. Speaking mostly in world- wide terms. Borlaug said food production is barely keeping pace with the monster." As population grows by 7fi million a year: the world needs an additional billion bushels of grain a year to "stand Grain Stocks The governors heard differ- ing views on a proposed program of government-held grain stocks strongly endorsed Cutting Silage Unfavorable crop conditions rivaling those of the 1 930s dust bowl days have caused farmer Jim Kuehl to cut this cornfield near Omaha, Neb., for silage. Here he examines dried stalks before going to work in the field'that last year yielded 1 10 bushels an acre. by Tony Dechant, president of the National Farmers Union. "The cost of reserves is only Ihe cost of not having a farm depression." Declianl said. Bui Rep. Paul Findley. (R- 111.1. called the idea prema- ture. is needed today is food production, not stipply- managoment stockpiling by the government.'' Findloy said. owe? fo Host I 974 Farm Progress Show FORT DODGE Tin- world's biggest farm show, the Farm Progress- show, is coming lo Iowa this fall, scheduled on Ihe Dale Ricke farm near Fort Dodge (let I- Harvest machinery will move through 750 acres of corn and acres nf soybeans during the three days of this ou-lhe-larm show. Then tillage equipment will follow up so farmers can see plenty of the newest and most modern farm machinery in action. Crops al the show site have been spared the heavy rains and hailstorms thai plagued much of Iowa Ibis spring. A timely inch of rain early in July has kepi the crops in good condition. Crops Evcellrnl "We have a few spoity areas that don't look too good. But on the whole. I'm real pleased wilh the crops this year." says Ricke. "Com- pared to many areas of the slate, our crops look excel- lent Ricke farms I.mil acres. All of it will he used for Ihe show. Other features include varieties of hybrid seed com growing side by side for farm- ers to compare. There will also be 82 varieties of bi'ans. Sll varieties of sorghum and Sll varieties of alfalfa in special plols Those plols are in a "ill- acre cxhibil field where more than .'jllll commercial compa nies will display their ncwes machinery, equipment, cheini cals. seed and other modcn farm products. Chemical plots will display 1511 difforen chemical treatments from r companies with check strip.' beside (hem. Building Display Several new buildings and structures will be on display for visitors to see. A new beef confinement building is unique. It features a gutter flush system that recycles wastes back to Ihe cattle. A 811-foot concrete slave silo has coiislruct- Li'd along with two 25-by So-fool airtight storage structures. A 28-by fill-foot shed with an endless conveyor bell for feed handling rounds on! the new beef equipment. A -IS-by IHS-fooi machine shed-shop will also be open for inspection. For women an appliance manufacturer will feature a kitchen demonstration and there will be a crafts show by Iowa Stale uimorsily home economists. There is no admission fee lo the Farm Progress show. Weather Outlook This is how precipitation and temperatures for the nation shape up for the next 30 days, according to the National Weather Service. ON THIS DATK MI bodiaii em men! allied In US bombers, figliling Ciimmnnisl rccs near Cambodia's capi- I'hniuil Penh WEEKEND AND r FUTURE COLLEGE BEST RENTAL RENTS THE BES1 7 DAYS lAWEEK.I BUILD A NEW HOME ON YOUR LOT ANY PLAN-ANY SIZE ANY Smi-ANY DESIGN ANYWHERE WE WILL BUILD ANY PLAN OUT OF OUR CATALOG OR 'ANY PLAN OF YOUR OWN. FREE ESTIMATES CNBRFVUr niWISHED 30 DAY DELIVERY GUARANTEED PRICE HIGHEST QUALITY FRHCOlORCArAlOO Prlco liit-Ownnri till TY BINNITT, RUILDIR R.E. ELY. IOWA PH. 848-4268 U.S. HOMES 5JM 2ND AVE, DB MOINES. INSURANCE SHOPPING? For a wide selection of insurance services, see your local Independent Insurance Agent, Henry Wltwer. He writes for a number of companies and that gives you a cholcn. For at'to, homeowners, commoriclal, farm and otfior kinds of insurance, lot an Independent Agent do your ihopplng for you. WITWER INSURANCE 701 MNB Phono 362-3030 Town The (edar Rapids Gazette: Frl Aug 2. 1974 Explaining Job Falls To Farmers Three 'I iii'iii-r [aiinh leu a Illcluiil-l! i! lird salute iit liiinitii when- Ins won- lii.id'- held a ;i '-lusi'i under -'andlug lichu'i'ii consumer groups, and ibusc IIIMiKeil 111 aL'ricullliri. Foreign Visitors charts were Frcy farm. Traudcrs fniin inure iliaii 3 slates stopped the event while passing through luwa and consumed (Her liall innnids 'if beef and 3.111111 cars nf sweel corn. The guest register even showed visitnrs friini as far as Bimn. West (ierniany. and France "People have no idea nf whal is involved when they purchase meal al the store. Sure, (hey are concerned about the high prices and usually they think it's the farmer getting profits." Turn- er commented. Arithmetic Shows "All of Ihe farmers I've questioned about prices they're getting for market- ready cattle say they're losing about S8II a head. Farmers have gone to Washington and shown receipts .on purchases and market sales plus Ihe money imnk'd in feeding, and simple arithmetic shows that then; isn't any profit." Turner said there is defi- nitely a section of information missing as In where high prices originate after they leave the farmer. The objec- tive is In gel high quality food products on the market al a fair price for everyone, lie said. Doesn't Blame Hickory Nuts Pa. (AP) _ Fuel] Gibbons, author of "Stalking the Wild As- paragus" and one of the na- tion's best-known advocates of natural foods, has an ulcer. It's not thai he's been eating too many dandelion greens or drinking ton much sassafras lea. the Gibbons hastened to explain after disclosing his ailment on Tuesday. He said he has been taking too many aspirins for aa arthritic condition and. ac- cording to Ins doctor. I liev caused the nicer Eyecatcher for 60 Years The design of this Northeast Iowa silo-barn was unusual when Thomas Reburn built ,t in 1914, and it still ,5. John Reburn of New Albin, the third generation of the family to use it, finds the around-the-silo center manger handy for his cattle feeding operation. Livestock walk in at ground level below; baled hay h unloaded above at another door at ground level on the uphill side. Focus on Forage at Tri-State Ag Days The lemming is a stout roden belonging to Ihe same family as most Canadian mice. DUBfQfE Dairymen and heef producers will have an opportunity to yet the lat- est information on foniyc pro- duction and handlinK tech- niques for their individual enterprises al Ihe Tri-Slale Ae, days. Sept. 11-12. This year's program, which will be held al Hie Dubuque county fairyrounri. has been expanded lo provide exhibits and information for Ihe beef producer as well as the dairy- man, according to Wendell Ryder. Dubuque area exten- sion livestock specialist Four Sponsors The Dubuque Chamber of Commerce cooperates with (he extension services of Inc Uni- versity of Illinois. Iowa State university and the University of Wisconsin lo sponsor the event which is aimed al en- Ihe continued of ihe dairy and beef cow industry in the Tri-Slale area More than Sll awi-business firms will display their equip- ment and products from In p.m. each day. The ex- hibits include materials han- dling and processhiK equip- ment: housing, sanitation and manure disposal systems: forage, harvesting, handling, transporting and feeding equipment: milk handling equipment: and livestock health, insect and disease control products. In addition, specialists fnim Ihe three universities will discuss the latest methods for produrmg more and belter forage and how to make the lies! use of the forage in dairy and beef operations. Speaker Topics U'illiam Albert. animal nutritionist, and l.co Fryman. dairy scientist, both from the University of Illinois, will talk about how to get the most out "f forages for dairy and beef cow nutrition. Frank Schaller. agronomist at Iowa State uni- versity, will discuss methods to increase foraae yields. Al Bringe. a dairy scientist from the University of Madison. will discuss housing, nutrition and management techniques for increasing dairy calf survival. Each speaker will make two :ill-minute presentations each day. Time will he available for visitors to discuss their in- dividual problems with Ihe specialists. The Oubuqui' county fairground Is located three miles west of Dubuque just off highway in. Signs will lie post- ON THIS DATE in IM. three Xorth Vietnamese PT boats fired torpedoes and 37 mm shells at an American des- troyer in international waters North Vietnam, and the destroyer and U.S. planes re- turned the fire. Farmers Alerted To Another Foe AMF.S (t'Pl) _ Iowa State university entomologists this week warned that corn fanners already hurt by hot weather and drought conditions now Face potential hazards from the rootworm beetle. Fnlomologist Harold S'.oek- dale said he has received several reports of damaged fields in central and southern sections nf the state. Stockdale said Ihe beetles are attracted lo the pollinating "i- silking con, fields. They feed on silk, thus preventing pollination and kernel develop- ment, lie said. The number of beetles required lo prevent pollination varies. Stockdale said, bill because of stress conditions such as the lack of moisture the number is greatly reduced. He said normally al leasl III in beetles are required before pollinating is inhibited, but due to the moisture stress five beetles per plant may be damaging. Slockdale said if farmers detect a niotunrni beelie problem, insecticide should he applied without hesitation. Want Ad office open 8-5 daily. Until noon Sat. f KILL UGLY CRABGRASS PECK HAS A GOOD SUPPLY OF ORTHO Liquid Crabgrass Killer and Scott's CLOUT SPECIAL THIS WEEK AT PECK'S All Potted ROSE BUSHES 25% OFF 393-5565 WEEKEND SPECIAL SWEETHEART ROSES OARPEN 5008 CENTER PT. RD. HE Think of it as a Wallbanger IOCO. Tak ake a tail glass lull oi ice. Add an ounce and a hall of Tortilla Tequila. An ounce of Nea- politan Italian Stylo Liqueur. Fill to trie top with Squut arid piop in a hunK oi lime Wnat h.ive crr1 A Cactus Banger a spunkv Cilrusy. South-e'-the-Borcio: j Kino of ina: bangfr fans jiisi love. Because ii s a o- a nl h.ntii'il in th hv KimiMim ;mcl I 'Mui'iir. HO Proof, I'lii.lin ('hi. lllm.ir, 60W3,   

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