Cedar Rapids Gazette, August 2, 1974, Page 7

Cedar Rapids Gazette

August 02, 1974

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Issue date: Friday, August 2, 1974

Pages available: 24

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Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - August 2, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Well-Fed Soldier Is o Good Soldier Th** (rdar Rapids Gazette Erl , Aor 2. 1974 CAMP McCOV, VVis (IDRA) _ 0\(.r si in mm worth -if food will he consumed bv Iowa national guardsmen presently attending annual training exercise at Camp McCoy At an average meal (lie troops mil devour a ton ol pot a toes, 2,200 chickens and tot) dozen eggs ll takes 70(1 pounds of ice inst to cool the iced tea consumed bv tile Iowans Those figures can Im* multiplied several times to obtain totals for the entire two-week training period Guard officials estimate, for example, that the troops vs ill consume over 20 tons of potatoes during the entire ( amp ( how < end oiler The man responsible for distribution of these huge quantities of chow at 4,400 meals three times a day is Warrant Officer lujgenc Bakula! who iii civilian life is a dietary training instructor at tile Woodward state hospital. ^ s a I'd of food,” Bakalar comments almost as an understatement. He is well trained for his lob Hi> military career includes handling food operations at battalion, brigade and division levels for troops in V ietnam and Korea ll takes a lot of management to run the food operation he sass as tie shuffles papers and meal orders At a ration breakdown point, Bakalar supervises tile dividing of food from huge bulk quantities into tile orders for each of the 4G dining facilities operated at Camp Mc Coy bv tile Iowa guard (A dining facility in the modern day military is the same tiling as a mess hall in the old army I Precise Breakdown Every sack of cookies and can of peas is expected to feed a certain number of troops — no more, no less The breakdown is precise if tin- army is serving garlic bread, if requires three-fourths of a pound of garlic for the bread for UMI soldiers Bakalar believes a well-fed soldier is a good soldier “I’ve never seen a unit that had a good dining facility that didn t have happy troops,” he said He takes a role in the kitchen at home and says he does a lot of cooking and shopping with his wife, Bonnie But the Iowa guardsman and state employe who is ultimately responsible for the preparation of thousands of meals admits that in the Bakalar kitchen, ‘‘she is the supervisor.” Drought Concerns Borlaug MINNEAPOLIS, Mum (AP) — Dr. Norman Iv Borlaug, a Nobel prize-winning food expert, said this week he was “horrified” at the extent of drought conditions in the I tilted Stites Borlaug returned last week after nearly six months in Asia arid Africa, working on food projects with developing nations While his information is incomplete. Borlaug said. “It doesn't look promising.” Ile said he had unconfirmed reports of substantial winter 4ill in the Russian winter wheat crop, a factor which could affect world prices. Critical of Inflation Borlaug spoke at the Midwest Governors' conference, joining Sen Hubert IL Humphrey. (D-Minn.) and others in a discussion of world food problems Borlaug criticized the federal government for dealing inadequately with inflation. "It seems to me we’ve become so obsessed with Watergate that we play Watergate-Watergate while inflation is ruining the world,” he said Borlaug won the Nobel Peace prize in BW) for developing a high-yield strain of wheat Speaking mostly in worldwide terms, Borlaug said food production is barely keeping pace with the “population monster.” As population grows by 7H million a year: the world needs an additional billion bushels of grain a year to “stand still”. Grain Stoc ks The governors heard differing views on a proposed program of government-held grain stocks strongly endorsed Cutting Silage - UPI Wirephoto Unfavorable crop conditions rivaling those of the 1930s dust bowl days have caused farmer Jim Kuehl to cut this cornfield near Omaha, Neb., for silage. Here he examines dried stalks before going to work in the field that last year yielded I I 0 bushels an acre. by Tony Dechant, president of the National Farmers Union. “The cost of reserves is only this'— the cost of not having a farm depression.’ Dechant said. But Rep. Paul Findley, (R 111 ), called the idea premature' “What is needed today is food production, not supply-management stockpiling by the government.” Findley said Iowa to Host I 974 Form Progress Show Weather Outlook This is how precipitation and temperatures for the nation shape up for the next 30 days, according to the National Weather Service. ON THIS DATE in 1973. Cambodian government troops, aided by C S bombers, were fighting Communist forces near Cambodia s c apital. Phnom Penh _ w • WEEKEND AND o. I KORT DOWIE - Thr worlds biggest farm show, the Farm Progress show, is coming to Iowa this fall, scheduled on the Dale Rieke farm near Fort Dodge Ort. I* 3. Harvest machinery will move through 750 acres of corn and IOO acres of soybeans during the' three* days of this on-the-farm show. Then tillage equipment will follow up so farmers can see plenty of the newest and most modern farm machinery in action. Crops at the show site have been spared the heavy ranis and hailstorms that plagued much of Iowa this spring. A timely inch of rain early in July has kept the crops in good condition Crops Exec* I lf nt “We have a few spotty areas that don’t look too good But on the whole, I'm real pleased with the crops this year. " says Ra ke "Compared to many areas of the state, our crops look excellent.” Ra ke farms LUM) acres All of it will he used for the show Other features include .‘107 varieties of hybrid seed corn growing side by side for farmers to compare. There will also In* 82 varieties of soy* beans. HU varieties of sorghum and KU varieties of alfalfa iii special plots Those plots are next to a 5U-acre exhibit field where more than .UMI commercial companies will display their newest machinery, equipment, chemicals. seed and other modern farm products. Chemical plots will display 15(1 different chemical treatments from 17 companies with check strips beside them. Building Display Several new buildings and structures will be on display for v isitors to see A new beef confinement building is unique. It feature's a gutter flush system that recycles wastes back to the* cattle A 30-by 80-foot concrete stave silo has bedh constructed along with two 25-bv 85-foot airtight storage structures. A 28-by 90-foot shed with an endless conveyor belt brr feed handling rounds out the new beef equipment. A 48-by 105-foot machine shed-shop will also he open for ins|M*ction. For women an appliance manufacturer will feature a kitchen demonstration and there will be a crafts show by Iowa State university home economists There Is no admission foe to the Farm Progress show. USTING o £ a future COLLEGE • BEST RENTAL RENTS HE BES 7 DAYS AWEEK. BUILD A NEW HOME ON YOUR LOT ANY PLAN-ANY SIZE ANY fTYU-ANY DESIGN ANY WHIBI WE Will BUILD ANY PIAN OUT OF OU* CATALOG O* ANY PIAN OF YOU* OWN FRIE ESTIMATES cuatrour FU ta is mid • 30 DAY DELIVERY • GUARANTEED P*ICf • HIGHEST QUALITY PMI COLO# CA TA LOO Mc* Iii! Owner* LUI TY MINNITI, BUILDER B.I. UY, IOWA PH. 848-4268 U.S. HOMES JJ90 IND AVI. DIS MOINIS. INSURANCE SHOPPING? For a wide .election of insurance lervlcs, tee your local Independent In.uronce Agent, Henry Wltwer. He write* for a number of compania* and that give* you a choice. For auto, homeowner*, commercial, farm and other kind* of Insurance, let an Independent Agent do your (Flopping for you. WITWER INSURANCE 701 MNR Phone 362-3030 Explaining Job Falls To Farmers IR RANT - "The biggest job facing beef farmers today is explaining to consumers wha! is involved in producing beef,” according to consumer lawyer James S Turner of Washington, I) Three Iowa cattlemen’s associations were host to Turner and family for a week which included a two-day Beef Salute at Durant, where his remarks were made The event was held with a goal of establishing a closer understanding between consumers, consumer groups, and those involved in agriculture Foreign Visitors Over 2.UMI interstate travelers, consumers and other interested people attended Beef Salute days on the Kenneth Frey farm near Durant Special livestock and machinery exhibits, farm displays and information charts were planned for the Frey farm. Travelers from more than 29 states stopped for the event while passing through Iowa and consumed over H50 pounds of beef and 3.(MMI ears of sweet corn. The* guest register even showed v isitors from as far as Bonn. West Germany, and Rodez. France “People have no idea of what is involved when they purchase meat at the store. Sure, they are concerned about the high prices and usually they think it s the fanner getting profits." Turner commented Arithmetic Shows “All of the farmers I ve questioned about prices they’re getting for market-ready cattle say they're losing about SHO a head. Farmers have gone to Washington and shown receipts on purchases and market sales plus the money invok’d in feeding, and simple arithmetic shows that there isn t any profit.” Turner said there is definitely a section of information missing as tit where high prices originate after they leave the farmer. The objective is to get high quality food products on the market at a fair price for everyone, he said. Doesn t Biome Hickory Nuts HARRISBURG. Pa (AP) -F im* 11 Gibbons, author of “Stalking tin* Wild Asparagus” and one of the nation s best-known advocates of natural foods, has an ulcer It s not that he's Imh'H eating tot* many dandelion greens or drinking too much sassafras tea, the 63-year-old Gibbons hastened,to explain after disclosing his ailment on Tuesday He said he has been taking too many aspirins for an arthritic condition and. according to his doctor, they caused the ulcer The lemming is a small, stout roden belonging to the same family as most Canadian mice Photo bv Eyecatcher for 60 Years The design of this Northeast Iowa silo-barn was unusual when Thomas Reburn built it in 1914, and it still is. John Reburn of New Albin, the third generation of the family to use it, finds the around-the-silo center manger handy for his cattle feeding operation. Livestock walk in at ground level below; baled hay is unloaded above at another door at ground level on the uphill side. Focus on Forage at Tri-State Ag Days Farmers Alerted To Another Foe DUBUQUE —- Dairymen and beef producers will have an opportunity to get the latest information on forage production and handling techniques for their individual enterprises at the Tri-State Ag days, Sept 11-12 This year's program, which will be held at the* Dubuque county fairground, has been expanded to provide exhibits and information for the tx*ef producer as well as the dairyman. according to Wendell Ryder. Dubuque area extension livestock sjiecialist Four Sponsors The Dubuque Chamber of Commerce cooperates with the extension services of the I ni-versity of Illinois. Iowa State university arid the University of Wisconsin to sponsor the event which is aimed at en (•enraging the continued growth of the dairy and beef cow industry in the Tri-State area More than 50 agri-business firms will display their equipment and products from 9 30 to 4 (NI p m. each day The exhibits include materials handling and processing equipment; housing, sanitation and manure disposal systems; j forage harvesting, handling, transporting and feeding equipment; milk handling equipment; and livestock health, insect and disease control products In addition, specialists from the three universities will discuss the latest methods for producing more and better forage and how to make tho best use* of the forage in dairy and l>eef operations Speaker Topics William Mbert. animal nutritionist, and Leo Frvman. dairy scientist, both from the University of Illinois, will talk | about how to get the most out j of forages for dairy and beef cow nutrition Frank Schaller, agronomist at Iowa State university. will discuss methods j to increase forage yields. Al Bringe, a dairy scientist from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss housing, nutrition and management techniques for increasing dairy calf survival Each speaker will make two 30-minute presentations each day. Time will he available for visitors to discuss their individual problems with the specialists The Dubuque county fairground is located three miles west of Dubuque just off j highway 20. Signs will be post-ed. ON THIS DATU in 19H4 three North Vietnamese PT boats fired torpedoes and 37 mm shells at an American destroyer in international waters off North Vietnam, and the destroyer and U S. planes returned the fin* AM KS (UPI) — Iowa State university entomologists this week warned that corn farmers already hurt by hot weather and drought conditions now face potential hazards from the rootworm beetle. Entomologist Harold Stockdale said he has received several reports of damaged fields in central and southern sections of the state Stockdale said the beetles are attracted to the pollinating or silking corn fields. They feed on silk. thus preventing pollination and kernel development. he said. The number of beetles required to prevent pollination varies, Stockdale said, hut because of stress conditions such as the lack of moisture the number is greatly reduced. He said normally at least IO to I) beetles an* required before pollinating is inhibited, but due to the moisture stress five beetles per plant may tie damaging Stockdale said if farmers detect a rootworm beetle problem, insecticide should lo* applied without hesitation V\ ant Ad office open daily. Until noon Sat 8-5 KILL UGLY CRABGRASS NOW! PECK HAS A GOOD SUPPLY OF ORTHO Liquid Crabgrass Killer and Scott’s CLOUT WEEKEND SPECIAL SWEETHEART ROSES s1.98/Doz. CASH & CARRY SPECIAL THIS WEEK AT PECK’S All Potted ROSE BUSHES 25% OFF got »wiw SOOL CENTER pflo. RE J ti m mJkii^ .Annus ■PtllllfOT Think of it as a Wallbanger gone loco. Take a tall glass Iud of ice. Add an ounce and a half of Tortilla Tequila An ounce of Neapolitan Italian Style Liqueur. Fill to the top with Squirt and plop in a hunk of frosh Iii Cactus Banger . . a spunky citrusy. South-of-the-Border kind of drink that Harvey Wall* banger fans have just got to love. Because ifs a sort of a Wallbanger gone loco. And once you try one , . , What have you got7 A genuine Tortilla Toquita. 80 Proof. Imported and bottled by Kingston and Compar Limited, Chicago, Illinois 60823 Neapolitan Liqueur, 80 Proof, Product and bottled in the USA. by tntornation.il Liqueurs, Chicago, Illinois G06i ;

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