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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 29, 1974 - Page 9

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 29, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Rapids Gazelle: Mon.. July 29. 1971 Farmer Don Hight surveys part of his buffalo herd near Murdo, S.D. Men who began raising buffalo as a novelty have begun to find out that the animals will outweigh, outfight and outsell a beef cow at market time. Prices are up and the demand for buffalo steaks is unprecedented, happy ranchers report. WASHINGTON (AI'l The ajjriciiltuiv department has Irimnu'd 1'J percent' tiff the hip til' its predicted estimate til' Ihe 1117-1-73 i-nrii crop because iif lint, dry weather this nitinth which has drought tu some sections of the nation's "breadbasket." The runue nf S.S3 tu K.2'2 billinn bushels nnw projected would still he a record crop, the Outlook and Situation Board said. weeks earlier the eorn production was plaeed at o 93 billion to Oo hillion bushels. The board also dropped its prospective figures for ihe combined i'eed grains and for soybeans. Reduced Feeding ll further explained thai a 31-millinn bushel underesti- mate of the July 1 carryover of wliea! was caused by re- duced feeding of that major sirain to livestock. The report said that a combination of an estimated feed carryover Oct. 1 of 'IK percent less than a year ajjo and the reduced prospects of this year's production means an even lighter supply into next year. The board also increased Ihe indicated exports of I'eed grains from the 1973-74 crops from -12.li million tons to -13.7 million, which will result in a further lowering of next year's carryover. Sorghum Down In addition to dropping pru.lccted corn output, ihe board reduced the grain sorghum estimate of S5II mil- lion bushels on July lo a range of S'Jll million to Soil million. Last year production readied !I37 million bushels. Soybean yield prospects, which were affected in the spring by rains that delayed planting, "have been further reduced by hot. dry weather tu a range of 25 to 27 bushels per acre." the report said. Prospects had been for yields of 3 2S bushels an acre after two seasons of 27.S- bushel yields. The board said that al- though it was reducing its estimates, "any projections concerning soybeans and products are extremely uncer- tain right now." Booklet Promises 'Real' Facts about Food Prices WASHINGTON (IT1) The agriculture department has produced a booklet which officials say contains "Ihe real facts" about what's been happening to food prices. According to the pamphlet, prices are up because: Consumers are earning more money and "bidding" more for food. Foreign demand for I'. S. farm products has increased. Poor Americans are getting more food aid. Food production dropped slightly last year. Costs charged by middle- men and retailers have in- creased. lowans Jake Active Roles In Junior Hereford Event COUNCIL BLUFFS At the first National Junior Polled Hereford Assn. heifer show and forum in Nashville, an lown was elected to the vice-chairman's position on the national council. D. Richard Olsen of Council Bluffs, president of the Iowa Junior Polled Hereford Assn., in addition to election to the council post was named direc- tor of Area 3, wnicn includes Iowa. Richard is a student at Iowa State university, major- ing in animal science. Other lowans who received honors in the 25-stale show were heifer exhibitors Jean Martin of Van Home, Rogar Olsen of Council Bluffs, Cindy Schmitt of Nichols and Becky Shaffer of Vinton. In a judging contest of over 300 participants, Craig Olsen of Minden placed first and Liberia Krug of Atkins placed seventh. The booklet, tilled "The Heal Facts about Food." includes a review of recent price trends and recites the explanations Agriculture Sec- retary Earl has given in repeated speeches of the price boom of the last two years. Food vs. Pay In the pamphlet says, the average American spent 17 cents per day more on food than in 1972. the biggest year- ly gain in a quarter of a cen- tury. Bui average after-tax take home pay in 1973 was up SI a day from 1972. The pamphlet also stressed Blitz's often-used statistic showing that only 13.7 percent of average U. S. income in 11173 was spent for food, compared with 511 percent or more spent in food in some other countries. Income Factor But the new booklet, unlike a similar one printed last year, conceded that families with incomes below S3.000 a year "may spend more than 50 percent of their after-tax in- comes on their food needs." Officials said (hey would distribute the new booklets free through agricultural groups and agriculture's off- ice of communicalions. FANTASTIC WALL COVERING BARGAINS FROM YOUR MORRIS DECORATING CENTER WALLPAPER UP TO O 5 BIG VOLUMES TO CHOOSE FROM OVER 500 PATTERNS FOR BEAUTIFUL HOME DECORATING PLASTIC-COATED WALLPAPER Beautiful colors and designs for every room in your home, limited selection. REGULAR 1.98 SINGLE ROLL PRE-PASTEO VINYL The answer to do-it-yourself dreams. So simple, just cut, wet and apply. REGULAR 5.29 SINGLE ROLL SCRUBBABLE VINYL WALL COVERING A sturdy, scrubbable vinyl wall covering that is stnp- pable and pre-pasted for easy decorating. REGULAR 5.85-12.45 SINGLE ROLL VINYL WALL COVERING A beautiful selection of patterns in strippoble, pre- xisted, pie-ttimmed wall covering. Matching fabrics available. REGULAR 3.95-9.95 SINGLE ROLL VINYL WALL COVERING... IMPORTED FROM ENGLAND Wide solcclion of styles in Itm durable wall cnviving REGULAR 5.50-9.95 SINGLE ROLL YOU CAN COUNT ON MORRIS FOR THE LARGEST SELEC- TION Of AIL TYPES OF WALL COVERINGS IN THE MIDWEST! Allow up to 5 days for delivery DECORATE NOW! 3 EASY WAYS TO PAY AVCO Better Living Plan, BankAmcricard or Master Charge. Decorating Centers 'Home of famous MORRIS PAINT' LINDALE PLAZA Phone 393-4016 HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Sat. 9 p.m. Bullish Buffalo Market Gold Roams Them Thar Hills By SlfU' Moure IIKI.KYV Mont (Al'l The buffalo market is bullish Ih-re mi the high plain-, of the Knckv Mountain country. r.iri'-.'MT-. '.dm rai'-irn; Imifal'i a-, a jimi'lly or hubby thi-y ha-.e bead's romping around Markets and restaurants are ordering buffalo meat in iv onl amnilnN Hob Srnali a Muotaoa rancher one of a handful rais- buffalo is --Hi! kicking himself liquidating part of Li- nl 'in-at herds o: buffalo iiuiiilii-nng an e-tmialed 211 mil- lion in Ihe joid-lsniK. once roamed tins rnunlry were for their hides and for meal as settlers mined Wes! -aid !h'-n- "I'ly HI 1SXH wh'-n the federal I'le.ernment took actimi lo them fnun stringent as those for slaughtei'ing beef aittiough all ou'.U'is are slate-itlsiiet ted Houck said some people not knowledgeable about buffalo had been critical of 'heir la! slaughter "because it siaugliter .iiiiinals are surplus males and old tnws. All producing females are kep' I don't knou 1.1 priiduc- tr.e ammaN used fnr slaui'hter he said A spokesman for National Bison range said the entire herd ihen- iirnbabK- i-i'ild In- si.lil at a IMliS. the range sold bulial" which lirought an a1. erage price of .yllJS -Is a head Victor range lorcmao. said the 7ti bufiaiu inoU'd tiiroiigh the aiu tioi: nag this >car iirought an ot Park Protection Km llonck, president nf the Buffalo A-.MI who operates a 311 H'lll-acre bulfalo ram h wesl ul I'li-ife. S I) -.aid I here are alinul Illlll buffalo in tins ciuiiiti-y Abonl 3.- Mm ul them arc un ivlune-, nr in li-deral parks I.Illlll in Yellnv.stiiMc naliutial park, about "iliil ;n wildlife re- fiiL-e ai Cache. Okla -illll at the Xatinn.il HIMIII raime in Mniitana and sniall'-r herds at other naliunal parks in the West. Tlie rest arc owned pmalely. lluuck. whu h" is the natnin's kiruesl hnllaln feeder with a herd of :i.3im _ not incladiny tills jear's calf cnip said there are 31.Illlll buflalo in Canada. If a rancher can keep the symbol nf the American West behind sloiit fences, odds are (here's money to he made. But keeping them fenced isn't easy, l.arue hulls have been known In reach pounds. The buffalo weighs from l.lillll lo 2.Illlil pnunils and roams constantly mcr L'real stretches nf i.'rassland. cattle, by comiiarison. don'! 1.31111 pounds and lack the buffalo's wanderlust.' r- s-4 t-x Representative Herd I'olllld tor piiunil. buffalo meat sell- at prices 'L'i lo oil percent higher [hall beef. A urass-fed buffalo is at lu 4 years nf age drain-fed cattle go lo market when 're two. The nearly llijllill-aere National Bison range was estab- lished III IHHS I" help perpetuate a replesentatlVe herd of American buffalo The herd is kept at about 320 animals "They're a pretty good piece of merchandise." May -aid. Aside from Hie meat demand, there is money in buffalo heads and tildes He estimated current sales of euli animals could be doubled or tripled overnight. llouck said his business is good. Demand is way in excess of supply and Ihe problem is distribution." He saitl some distributors are leery of adding bnlfalo beef to their product line for fear the supply will run out. He began buffalo ranching in 1M3H. His son. Jerry, said sales of buffalo meat at SI. 33 a pound for the hind quarter are at least 2o percent higher than for a comparable beef quarter. He said most ranch sales are to private purchasers and chain Largest Customers Began as Hobby Schall said raising buffalo has been akin to a poker game and he lost one hand. "If I'd seen this increased demand 1 probably would have fenced a little better and not liquidat- ed." He had about 1311 animals in recent years but cul the herd lo about nil on Ihe ranch he operates on the Flat- head Indian reservation south of the National Bison range. "I got started in this as a hobby, but the buffalo have been real good for the he said. Schall recently shipped some heifer calves to Idaho for about 84110 each. He has customers in Washington as well, and in his own region. "One man runs a restaurant in East Port. Idaho, and he's on me all the time for buffalo. Highl now he has some deal on the World's Fair Expo '74 in Spokane. Wash., arid he wants some Schall said. Houck said buffalo slaughter for commercial purposes, in any volume, began to 12 years ago. It started on a Wyom- ing ranch where Ihe meat was sold to Safeway stores and then in state park. S.D.. where it was sold to Red Owl Slaughter Surplus He operates his own slaughter and processing plant. Some of the meat is processed at USDA-inspected plants, such as one in Rapid City, S.D.. but Houck noted buffalo is still considered "a wild and restrictions are not as The Durham Meat Co.. San Jose. Calif., lists Safeway. Hod Owl, National Tea and Albertson's supermarket chains as large customers for buffalo meat. Bud Flocchini, vice-president and part owner of Durham, said his firm also has buffalo meat available by mail order in relatively small quantities. It sells for 911 a pound for bone- less buffalo sleak, 84.10 a pound for T-bone steak, for roasts, S3. S3 for stew meat and SI. for ground buffalo burg- er. The California company operates a buffalo ranch of acres near Gillette, Wyo.. feeding about 3.01111 head. In many instances, Flocchini said, buffalo meat sells 30 percent higher than a comparable cut of beef. Jim Sahnond. his brother and lather operate a acre ranch west of Choteu on the east side of the Continental Divide where their 73 buffalo roam between the Sun and Teton rivers. "They just travel wherever they want lo go. They're on Ihe move all Ihe time." he said. Japanese Purchase The herd is down from 120 animals in previous years and Ihe Salmonds are rebuilding, because of demand. The Salmonds recently sold pounds of buffalo bull meat lo Japan at a pound. At the time, that was about 40 percent more than the same amount of beef would have brought. Kenmore Zig-Zag Sale Ends P.M. Regular Just Dial to Sew Zip-Zag. straight, blind hemming and mending stitches 4 stretch stitches Built-in buttonholing I'sc Scars Ka-v 1'avment Plan Install the Head in Your Own.1 Sears Case or Cabinet or Buy the Case or Cabinet Illustrated Handsome Cabinet Carrying Case 39 99 Walnut-finish hard- wood w i t li in p d i u m sheen. Brass-finish pull. Lots of work space: wide, opened. 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