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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 28, 1974 - Page 9

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 28, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Grimmest choice pending: Eat less so others won't starve? The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Sun., July 28. 1974 Jenkin Lloyd Jones JAM HIDINd through A up lln- beautiful Willamette vallcv in Oregon mi the Kranrisni tram. and 1 ,lm thinking Ton; Mcl'all's surprising siati-meiil lh.it should yank in the welcome ni.it This has horrified Chambers i'um mcrce iind i-ily hniister-, Ohvioiish Oregon were farmed as intciisiveK as lapan nr Italy u nuld support mnn. people a In! more. maybe In a f.icinr m three nr four. But then, uf course. it wouldn't lie Oregon. The flat land where rain [alls m where vim might irrigate would he a flour nl tiny lanns, mtensivch lined, hy night MU! and me- ticulously harvested Tllere'd he little fur livestock ex- cept on the thin, dry grasslands east nf the Sierras. drain is a mH'ficiem fund if >nn rim il through cows. pigs and chickens first, sn an Oregon that held all the people it coiilil hold would be gnim- cating ciuiiiiry. What brings on these thoughts is an article nn my knci- in the evening Pnrlland -lournal. a speech in that citv by Dr. Carroll llardin. expert anil professor at the I'niversity of California at Santa Bar- hara. We must stnp feeding the pour nations nf the world for their good and ours, says Dr. llardin. He holds that world popula- tion. now scheduled to dnuhle in years. is out of control and efforts hy the food- rich countries to feed already overcrowded lands would he like feeding a cancer. "Kindness" that intensifies crowding may not he kind. Dr. llardin asserts that before we started sending billion worth of food In India in the and 80s. India's population was growing 1..1 per- cent a year. By 1970. in spite of massive efforts by the Indian government in favor of family planning, it was growing 2.5 percent. Food countries, he said, will not buckle down and solve their population problems as long as their begging bowls are filled, nr even partly filled. "We should not." he asserts, "es- tablish an international food bank as proposed hy Sen. Kennedy and others. All this will do is siphon food and wealth from rich countries to the poor nations and this wealth will be converted entirely into babies." Reword What we should do instead, he sug- gests. is offer food to such lands us soon as they achieve zero growth. With willy-nilly handouts there would be little incentive to achieve this by the method that is both effective and bound to be unpopular namely, required sterilization of parents after they have produced enough children to equal the rate of replacement. Real starvation. Dr. Hardin says. would be a powerful argument, as it certainly would be. So as I ride up the Willamette valley in the gathering dusk with my belly full of the fruits of the ample dining car it is not hard to think of the abstraction, "let 'em starve." Rut if you've ever really looked at the bloated stomachs, the wasted arms, the wide eyes of starving children, yon search yom pockets and wish you had a sack on your back. We are in this jam because man is an egotistical fool who has been telling himself that because he has a soul he is exempt from the laws of nature that govern all other animals. We forgot that we. too. have mouths and no bottomless stores of manna. Once he learned the skills that have enabled him to push back death he should have known that someday he would have to hmii life. If a farmer would put loo many cattle on leo little acreage, the SI'CA would holler for the sheriff and have him thrown in the pokey for cruelty to animals. Ye! al the same time we have had holy men running around countries Ilia! are already overgrazed hy human beings, preaching "Increase and mul- tiply. Kverv five days the earth adds another million people. Deadly game The frightening fact is thai a food-rich country like ours is not lar from Hie point where we will need all thai we can produce lor ourselves unless we are willing In nil our living standards sharply. So it is the generation now in college lhal is going to have to make the grim- mesl decision Americans cv IT made. Will they he willing to eat less meal and perhaps eieu cut the eercal ration tor their children so that Cnsia Idea, which will have twice as mam people IS vrars from now can pla.v the deadlv game a llllle longer" 'Pessimistic forecasts needn't overwhelm us' By Norman Cousins WHAT DOES the United Nations need in order to survive'? The recurring crises in the Middle Fast, punctuated today hy the Turkish- (Ireek confrontation over Cyprus, call for a fresh look al the United Nations. In any attempt to restructure the United Nations, il may be useful tn think of Ihe world problems for which there is now no adequate response. One problem is world security, of which the arms; race is only one feature. Another problem is fast-developing food shortages, with Ihe grim prospecl of mass famine within two years. Still another problem is the interna- tional predatory race for Ihe wealth of resources that now lie on the ocean flour. Vet another is the use nf outer space as a nuclear shooting gallery, with all the world's cities as targets. And. of course, the problem represented hy the poisoning of Ihe world's atmosphere and oceans. These problems are difficult hut they are not insoluble. II is quite possible thai the United Nations can be built up in terms of ils authority needed to meet these individual problems. Begin with Ihe problem of imminent mass famine as an example of what might be done. Norman Cousins The present World Food Organization should be upgraded to the status of a World Food Authority as an integral part of the United Nations. It should he able to support and expedite research in ni- trogen fixation, a process that has the potentiality for cutting fertilizer prices by more Hum half and increasing the food yields by at least half as much again. The WFA would also have a capability for undertaking research in tion. The aim here would be to open up vast areas of wasteland and to increase Ihe world's need for water for agricul- tural purposes. Other world problems lhal call for world solutions require similar world approaches. The sum total of all these agencies or authorities, properly stitched together, is what is meanl by world order. diving Ihe United Nations such powers is not a simple thing. Moreover, the ten- dency to abuse power is always a danger whenever power is created. The antidotes to abuse of government power are checks and balances, constant searchlighting. constant review1 and overhaul, open communications, limited appointment or election of officials. The world's ultimale problems are nol scientific or technological. The ultimate problems continue to be the problems of governance how to translate common needs into workable answers, which is lo say. how to create instruments to serve the common interest without becoming more of a problem than the problems they were intended to solve; how to provide the citizenry with the flow of in- formation essential to correct abuses and to encourage persons of stature and in- tegrity to serve the world public. If enough people can he found who are willing to attach Ihemselves to the proposition that the human species is in- telligent and energetic enough to think and work in world terms, the pessimistic forecasts of the experts no longer need paralyxe or intimidate. II is quite possible that Ihe destiny of humanity in Ihe uexl nil years will he to prove the experts wrong; in fact, human destiny depends on it. Way with words Folks who count By Theodore M. Bernstein N nation's railways hy converting them in- to airvvavs for electronically guided low -flying, sale, all-weather let planes everything sleps in a flight of slairs. hl. street or whalever. The word that probably will come first In your mind is bill dial's mil il. The real word is nrifhinomnnin. Il Is Word Arilhmomonio conies appears m Webster's iinahridged die- Creek nrifhmos, meaning llniiiiry. which defines il as "a number, and nmnio, meaning madness. sive desire to muni objects; obsession I'm Hiem logrllier and vou have the con- There is a dis indum between these two words. Prric- coliio triers in something Ihat can be one, profiled! refers In lhal ail he dime n-eliillj nr valnalilv. Oil anollicr occasion your host gave an lluslriiliiin ol Ihe dislinctioii between Ilir vni'ds hy presentiin; a pel idea of his v Inch lias ten now hei r it mav be rncoMe In gel double use on) ol the Theodore M. Bernstein Open Sunday 12 to 5 Patio Shop Corner 2nd Ave. 5th St. SE men's 26" 10 Speed Now 63.99 Reg. 79.99 Save Men's 26 1 0 speed with front and rear caliper hand brakes, deraiHeur gear system, stem-mounted shifter, and more. Women's 10 spaed, Reg. 79.99 Now 63.99 savings on all JC Penney a multi speed bikes S3 Men's 26" 10-speed Now 67.99 Reg. 84.99 Save Men's deluxe 26" 10 speed racer has center pull front and rear caliper hand brakes with dual levers. Stem mounted gear shifter and more. Black or Yellow. Men's 26" 3 speed Reg. 67.99 Now 54.39 Save 13.60 Women's 26" 3 speed Reg. 67.99 Now 54.39 Save 13.60 Men's 26" 5 speed Reg. 79.99 Now 63.99 Save Women's 26" 5-speed Reg. 79.99 Now 63.99 Save Men's 27" 10 Speed Reg. 89.99 Now 71.99 Save In Carton prices Assembly Everyone Saves at our pre-season sale on heavy- weight jackets Sale 1120 to 1920 514 lo fhol's oil our nrw loll lor girls 7 lo 14, 3 lo 6. IPIush piles, nylons will, quilled linings, wool ploids ond Iwrads, foko k'Olhors and furs ond mere. Sale H18to 1598 Boys Reg 13.98 to 19.98. Popular boys' styles, including porkas, Imed C.P.O. locket-, ond mony more. Big choice of fabrics, too. Many machine washnblc. In plaids, patterns and colors Pre-schaol ond school-age sizes. Sale Womens1 to i55. off all our jackets and panf coats in slock, women's ond half sizes included. Imilalion suedes, loalhor-looks Corduroys, wnol meltofu, twoeds, plaids, and lots more. Sale to Mens Rpg 27 50 If. Greol Looking ,ockets in bin selection of styles and fabrics. Including toothers, nylons, cottons, polyeslrrv wooK ond othrr hlnndv In assorted ploicls, pciNerm ond colnrv All in a full rnnrjp of Open 5 Nights A Week. Monday thru Friday Saturday 9-5 Sunday 12-5   

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